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  • 1.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    What More Than Parental Income, Education and Occupation? An Exploration of What Swedish Siblings Get from Their Parents: (Contributions), Article 1022010In: B. E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, ISSN 1935-1682, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sibling correlations are broader measures of the impact of family and community influences on individual outcomes than intergenerational correlations. Estimates of such correlations in income show that more than half of the family and community influences that siblings share are uncorrelated with parental income. We employ a data set with rich family information to explore what factors in addition to traditional measures of parents' socio-economic status can explain sibling similarity in long-run income. Measures of family structure and social problems account for very little of sibling similarities beyond that already accounted for by income, education and occupation. However, when we add indicators of parental involvement in schoolwork, parenting practices and maternal attitudes, the explanatory power of our variables increases from about one-quarter (using only traditional measures of parents' socio-economic status) to nearly two-thirds.

  • 2.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, Randi
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Pettersson, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Könsskillnader i brottslighet - hur kan de förklaras?2018In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 67-78Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi dokumenterar könsskillnader i lagföringar och presenterar de i litteraturen vanligast förekommande förklaringsansatserna. Män begår fler och grövre tillgreppsbrott samt våldsbrott, medan kvinnor begår färre och lindrigare tillgreppsbrott, företrädesvis utan våld. För att förklara dessa viktiga könsskillnader menar vi att man, utöver de vanligaste ekonomiska incitamenten, även måste ta hänsyn till könsskillnader i icke-kognitiva förmågor, kamrateffekter samt könsroller och den ”manliga” identitet som tillåter och ibland uppmuntrar till våld.

  • 3.
    Böhlmark, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Life-Cycle Variations in the Association Between Current and Lifetime Income: Country, Cohort and Gender Comparisons2005Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Corak, Miles
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mazumder, Bhashkar
    A Comparison of Upward and Downward Intergenerational Mobility in Canada, Sweden and the United States2014Report (Other academic)
  • 5. Corak, Miles
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mazumder, Bhashkar
    A comparison of upward and downward intergenerational mobility in Canada, Sweden and the United States2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 30, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use new estimators of directional rank mobility developed by Bhattacharya and Mazumder (2011) to compare rates of upward and downward intergenerational mobility across three countries: Canada, Sweden and the United States. These measures overcome some of the limitations of traditional measures of intergenerational mobility such as the intergenerational elasticity, which are not well suited for analyzing directional movements or for examining differences in mobility across the income distribution. Data for each country include highly comparable, administrative data sources containing sufficiently long time spans of earnings. Our most basic measures of directional mobility, which simply compare whether sons moved up or down in the earnings distribution relative to their fathers, do not differ much across the countries. However, we do find that there are clear differences in the extent of the movement. We find larger cross-country differences in downward mobility from the top of the distribution than upward mobility from the bottom. Canada has the most downward mobility while the U.S. has the least, with Sweden in the middle. We find some differences in upward mobility but these are somewhat smaller in magnitude. An important caveat is that our analysis may be sensitive to the concept of income we use and broader measures such as family income could lead to different conclusions. Also, small differences in rank mobility translate into rather large differences in absolute mobility measured in dollars, due to large differences in income inequality across countries.

  • 6.
    Hederos Eriksson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, Randi
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sandberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    The importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of crime2016In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 219-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We quantify the importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of criminal convictions and incarceration by estimating sibling correlations. At the extensive margin, factors common to siblings account for 24 % of the variation in criminal convictions and 39 % of the variation in incarceration. At the intensive margin, these factors typically account for slightly less than half of the variation in prison sentence length and between one third and one half of the variation in criminal convictions, depending on crime type and gender. Further analysis shows that parental criminality and family structure can account for more of the sibling crime correlation than parental income and education or neighborhood characteristics. The lion's share of the sibling correlation, however, is unaccounted for by these factors. Finally, sibling spacing also matters-more closely spaced siblings are more similar in their criminal behavior.

  • 7. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Holmlund, Helena
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Effect of Education on Criminal Convictions and Incarceration: Causal Evidence from Micro-data2015In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 125, no 587, p. 1290-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the causal effect of educational attainment on conviction and incarceration using Sweden's compulsory schooling reform as an instrument for years of schooling and a 70% sample from Sweden's Multigenerational Register matched with more than 30years of administrative crime records. We find a significant negative effect of schooling on male convictions and incarceration; one additional year of schooling decreases the likelihood of conviction by 6.7% and incarceration by 15.5%. Though OLS estimates for females are of a similar magnitude to those for males, we find no evidence of a significant causal effect for women.

  • 8. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Labour economics and crime2018In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 52, p. 147-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Like Godfather, Like Son: Exploring the Intergenerational Nature of Crime2012In: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 550-582.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sons (daughters) with criminal fathers have 2.06 (2.66) times higher odds of having a criminal conviction than those with noncriminal fathers. One additional paternal sentence increases sons' (daughters') convictions by 32 (53) percent. Compared to traditional labor market measures, the intergenerational transmission of crime is lower than that for high school completion but higher than that for poverty At the intensive margin, the intergenerational crime relationship is as strong as those for earnings and years of schooling. Parental human capital and parental behaviors can account for 60-80 percent of the intergenerational crime relationship. Paternal role-modeling also matters.

  • 10. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Causal Effects of Military Conscription on Crime2019In: The Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, Vol. 129, no 622, p. 2522-2562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the causal effect of mandatory military conscription in Sweden on the criminal behaviour of men born in the 1970s. We find that military service significantly increases post-service crime (overall and across multiple crime categories) between the ages of 23 and 30. These results are driven primarily by young men who come from low socioeconomic status households and those with pre-service criminal histories, despite evidence of a contemporaneous incapacitation effect of service for the latter group. Much of this crime-inducing effect can be attributed to negative peer effects experienced during service. Worse post-service labour market outcomes may also matter.

  • 11.
    Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Queen Mary, U. of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Origins of Intergenerational Associations in Crime: Lessons from Swedish Adoption Data2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We use Swedish adoption data combined with police register data to study parent-son associations in crime. For adopted sons born in Sweden, we have access to the criminal records of both the adopting and biological parents. This allows us to assess the relative importance of pre-birth factors (genes, prenatal environment and perinatal conditions) and post-birth factors for generating parent-son associations in crime. When considering the extensive margin, we find that pre-birth and post-birth factors are both important determinants of sons' convictions and that mothers and fathers contribute equally through these two channels. At the intensive margin, pre-birth factors still matter, however post-birth factors appear to dominate. In particular, adopting mothers appear to matter most for the probability that sons will be convicted of multiple crimes and/or be sentenced to prison. We find little evidence of interaction effects between biological and adoptive parents' criminal convictions. Having more highly educated adoptive parents, however, does appear to mitigate the impact of biological parents' criminality.

  • 12. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The origins of intergenerational associations in crime: Lessons from Swedish adoption data2013In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 20, p. 68-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use Swedish adoption data combined with police register data to study parent-son associations in crime. For adopted sons born in Sweden, we have access to the criminal records of both the adopting and biological parents. This allows us to assess the relative importance of pre-birth factors (genes, prenatal environment and perinatal conditions) and post-birth factors for generating parent-son associations in crime. When considering the extensive margin, we find that pre-birth and post-birth factors are both important determinants of sons' convictions and that mothers and fathers contribute equally through these two channels. At the intensive margin, pre-birth factors still matter, however post-birth factors appear to dominate. In particular, adopting mothers appear to matter most for the probability that sons will be convicted of multiple crimes and/or be sentenced to prison. We find little evidence of interaction effects between biological and adoptive parents' criminal convictions. Having more highly educated adoptive parents, however, does appear to mitigate the impact of biological parents' criminality.

  • 13. Lefgren, Lars
    et al.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sims, David
    Rich Dad, Smart Dad: Decomposing the Intergenerational Transmission of Income2012In: Journal of Political Economy, ISSN 0022-3808, E-ISSN 1537-534X, Vol. 120, no 2, p. 268-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We construct a simple model, consistent with Becker and Tomes, that decomposes the intergenerational income elasticity into the causal effect of financial resources, the mechanistic transmission of human capital, and the role that human capital plays in the determination of fathers' permanent incomes. We show how a particular set of instrumental variables could separately identify the money and human capital transmission effects. Using data from a 35 percent sample of Swedish sons and their fathers, we show that only a minority of the intergenerational income elasticity can be plausibly attributed to the causal effect of fathers' financial resources.

  • 14.
    Lindquist, Matthew
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Björklund, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Background and Income during the Rise of the Welfare State: Brother Correlations in Income for Swedish Men Born 1932-19682009In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 93, no 5-6, p. 671-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate if the association between family background and income in Sweden has changed for men born between 1932 and 1968. Our main finding is that the share of the variance in long-run income that is attributable to family background, the so-called brother correlation in income, has fallen by some 17% from 0.49 for the cohorts of brothers born in the early 1930s to below 0.32 for the cohorts born around 1950. From then on, the correlations have inched back up to around 0.37. We report suggestive evidence that the decline is driven by changes in education.

  • 15.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Book Review of From Parents to Children: The Intergenerational Transmission of Advantage2014In: The Journal of Economic Inequality, ISSN 1569-1721, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 157-161Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality in Sweden2005Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, Randi
    Driving Under the Influence of Our Fathers2010In: B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, ISSN 1935-1682, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 100-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses data from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study to document intergenerational associations in drunk driving between fathers and their children. The proportion of sons with a record of drunk driving is 2.3 times larger for sons whose fathers have a conviction for drunk driving than for sons whose fathers have not been convicted. For daughters, the proportion is 7.8 times larger. The average number of convictions is twice as large for sons whose fathers have a conviction for drunk driving than for sons whose fathers have not been convicted. For daughters, the average number of convictions is 15.3 times larger. We argue that these intergenerational associations in drunk driving have important implications for treatment strategies and public policy.

  • 18.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Does placing children in foster care increase their adult criminality?2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 31, no Dec, p. 72-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Does placing children in foster care increase their adult criminality?2014In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 31, no Dec, p. 72-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Does Placing Children in Foster Care Increase Their AdultCriminality?2013Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Does Placing Children in Foster Care Increase Their AdultCriminality?2013Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholms universitet, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Does Placing Children in Out-of-Home Care Increase Their AdultCriminality?2012Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Santavirta, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Does Placing Children in Out-of-Home Care Increase Their AdultCriminality?2012Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Sweden2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to study (empirically) the dynamics of child poverty in Sweden, the quintessential welfare state. We find that 1 out of every 5 children is disposable income poor at least once during his or her childhood, while only 2 percent of all children are chronically poor. We also document a strong life-cycle profile for child poverty. Approximately 8.6 percent of all children are born into poverty. The average poverty rate then drops to about 7.5 percent among 1- year old children. After which, it declines (monotonically) to about 3.8 percent among 17-year olds. Children in Sweden are largely protected (economically) from a number of quite serious events, such as parental unemployment, sickness and death. Family dissolution and long-term unemployment, however, do push children into poverty. But for most of these children, poverty is only temporary. Single mothers, for example, are overrepresented among the poor, but not among the chronically poor. Children with immigrant parents are strongly overrepresented among the chronically poor; as are children whose parents have unusually low educations. We argue that information about the dynamics of child poverty may help policy makers to construct more salient policies for fighting child poverty.

  • 25.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Sweden2012In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1423-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the dynamics of child poverty in Sweden. We find that one out of every five children is disposable income poor at least once during childhood, while only 2% are chronically poor. Children in Sweden are protected economically from many serious events such as parental sickness and death. Family dissolution and parental unemployment do push some children into poverty. However, these poverty spells are mostly temporary. Single mothers, for example, are overrepresented among the poor but not among the chronically poor. Children with immigrant parents are strongly overrepresented among the chronically poor.

  • 26.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sol, Joeri
    van Praag, C. Mirjam
    Vladasel, Theodor
    On the Origins of Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Sibling Correlations2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We assess the broad importance of family and community background for entrepreneurship outcomes. We go beyond traditional, intergenerational associations by estimating sibling correlations in unincorporated and incorporated entrepreneurship using register data from Sweden. Sibling correlations range from 20% to 50%. They are consistently higher for more committed and incorporated entrepreneurship than for less committed or unincorporated entrepreneurship; they are also higher for brothers than sisters. We then assess what factors drive these correlations: parental entrepreneurship, neighborhoods, shared genes and financial resources help explain these high correlations, whereas immigration status, family structure and sibling peer effects have a limited contribution. The higher correlation for incorporated versus unincorporated entrepreneurship is explained mainly by the type of parental entrepreneurial engagement and financial resources, while the gap between brother and sister correlations in unincorporated entrepreneurship is largely driven by the geographic concentration of male dominated industries.

  • 27.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sol, Joeri
    Van Praag, Mirjam
    Why Do Entrepreneurial Parents Have Entrepreneurial Children?2015In: Journal of Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 269-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the origins of the intergenerational association in entrepreneurship using Swedish adoption data that allow us to quantify the relative importance of prebirth and postbirth factors. We find that parental entrepreneurship increases the probability of children's entrepreneurship by about 60%. For adoptees, both biological and adoptive parents make significant contributions to this association. These contributions, however, are quite different in size. Postbirth factors account for twice as much as prebirth factors in our decomposition of the intergenerational association in entrepreneurship. We investigate several candidate explanations for this large postbirth factor and present suggestive evidence in favor of role modeling.

  • 28.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vilhelmsson, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Is the Swedish Central Government a Wage Leader?2004Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Zenou, Yves
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Monash University, Australia; Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Sweden; IZA Institute of Labor Economics, Germany; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), UK.
    Crime and Networks: 10 Policy Lessons2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates how tools from social network analysis can be used to provide practical guidance for the design of crime prevention policies.

  • 30.
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Zenou, Yves
    Crime and Networks: 10 Policy Lessons2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social network analysis can help us understand more about the root causes of delinquent behavior and crime and provide practical guidance for the design of crime prevention policies. To illustrate these points, we first present a selective review of several key studies and findings from the criminology and police studies literature. We then turn to a presentation of recent contributions made by network economists. We highlight 10 policy lessons and provide a discussion of recent developments in the use of big data and computer technology.

1 - 30 of 30
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