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  • 1.
    Billingsley, Sunnee
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Neyer, Gerda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Wesolowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The influence of family policies on women´s childbearing: A longitudinal micro-data analysis of 21 countries2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes whether and how family policies are related to women’s first and second child transitions in 21 post-industrial countries. We adapt the social investment approach developed in welfare state research and distinguish between investment-oriented family policies and traditional, protection-oriented family policies. Our family policy indicators vary over time and are merged with fertility histories provided by harmonized individual level data. We use multilevel event-history models and control for time-varying unobserved heterogeneity at the country level and individual-level characteristics. Higher family-policy support of both types is correlated with the postponement of first births, particularly among young women, whereas traditional-family support is also correlated with postponement among older women and women in education. Both types of family support are linked to earlier first births among lower educated women. Only investment-oriented support is correlated with second birth transitions and this positive relationship does not vary for women with different educational levels.

  • 2.
    Wesolowski, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Prevalence and correlates of the use of contraceptive methods by women in Ukraine in 1999 and 20072015In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 1547-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Wesolowski, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Borodachova, J.
    Shukhatovich, V.
    Репродуктивные установки в Беларуси [Fertility intentions in Belarus]: анализ социальных и демографических детерминант [Analysis of social and demographic determinants]2017In: ЗДОРОВЬЕ НАСЕЛЕНИЯ: ПРОБЛЕМЫ И ПУТИ РЕШЕНИЯ [Health of the population: Problems and solutions]: Материалы международного научно-практического семинара, 18-19 мая 2017: СБОРНИК НАУЧНЫХ СТАТЕЙ, Institute of Sociology of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus , 2017, p. 342-350Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Wesolowski, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family policies and Fertility – Examining the link between Family Policy Institutions and Fertility Rates in 33 Countries 1995-20112017Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Wesolowski, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family policies and fertility: Examining the link between family policy institutions and fertility rates in 33 countries 1995-20112018In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1057-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the link between two different family policy dimensions – one supporting the combination of work and parenthood and one supporting stay-at-home mothers – and fertility rates between 1995 and 2011 in 33 industrialized countries. Design/methodology/approach: Total fertility rates were regressed on the two policy dimensions, earner–carer support and traditional–family support, using pooled time-series analysis with country fixed effects and stepwise control for female labor force participation, unemployment rates and GDP. Findings: The analyses show that earner–carer support is linked to higher fertility, while traditional–family support is not. Also, higher female labor force participation is linked to higher fertility before GDP is included. Conversely, higher unemployment is correlated with lower fertility levels. Sensitivity analyses with and without day care enrollment on a smaller set of countries show no influence of day care on the results for family policy. Originality/value: The results give weight to the argument that family policies supporting the combination of work and parenthood could increase fertility in low-fertility countries, probably mediated in part by female labor force participation. Earnings-related earner–carer support incentivizes women to enter the labor force before parenthood and to return to work after time off with their newborn child, thus supporting a combination of work and parenthood.

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