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  • 1.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bedömning som lärande: Vad elever kan lära sig genom att ge feedback2014In: CEPRA-striben, ISSN 1903-8143, no 14, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Learning from giving feedback: a study of secondary-level students 2015In: ELT Journal, ISSN 0951-0893, E-ISSN 1477-4526, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 58-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on how Swedish lower secondary-level students can improve their writing ability by acting as peer reviewers. It is based on an empirical study carried out in a Swedish EFL classroom, and it addresses the implementation of a teaching unit which included negotiations of a joint criteria list, feedback training, group peer reviewing, and the production of first and final drafts of the written task. Findings suggest that the peer reviewers increased their awareness of audience and genre, and that the content of the reviewed reply letters inspired subsequent revision changes affecting writing at the macro-level in particular.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Learning from Giving Feedback: Insights from EFL Writing Classrooms in a Swedish Lower Secondary School2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present thesis aims to describe teenagers as peer reviewers and explore possible benefits of giving feedback. My study was carried out in two EFL classrooms in year eight in a Swedish lower secondary school, where the pupils were engaged with the written task to write an informative reply letter in English. The teaching unit included negotiations of a joint criteria list, feedback training, peer review, and the production of first and final drafts of the reply letter. Data were collected from multiples sources: texts produced in class, audio- and video-recordings, questionnaires and interviews.

    My main findings suggest that pupils can learn about writing from giving feedback. By adopting a reader perspective, the pupils raised their genre and audience awareness. Moreover, the peer-reviewed reply letters served as inspiration both in terms of transfer of structure, such as rhetorical organisation, and of ideas and content. Self-reports indicated that the pupils in my study enhanced their ability to self-assess and edit their own writing, which suggests that transferable skills were developed as a result of peer review. As regards micro-level aspects of writing, reading and commenting on peers’ reply letters seemed to influence a smaller number of pupils to transfer patterns and spelling. In their role as peer reviewers, the pupils successfully identified strengths and weaknesses in their peers’ writing, but the feedback comments did not include much specific formative information.

    My findings contribute to research on L2 writing and peer feedback by showing that younger learners can benefit from giving feedback. This is significant since previous research has mainly been carried out at university and college level. In addition, by combining text analyses, classroom observation and pupils’ self-reports, my study offers a comprehensive understanding of peer review.

  • 4.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Writing, reviewing, and revising: Peer feedback in lower secondary EFL classrooms2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates pupils’ learning about writing from giving feedback. Research on peer assessment and L2 writing is plentiful, but little attention has been given to younger learners and to potential benefits for the peer feedback provider. My project was carried out as two intervention studies with Swedish pupils in year 8. During the intervention, the pupils wrote two drafts of various genres (the reply letter, the newspaper article, and the argumentative essay), and the teaching involved a joint formulation of criteria lists, feedback training, and peer review in groups. Learning from giving feedback was operationalised as links between the revision changes made to the first draft and the peer feedback provision.

    Results show that the pupils were able to produce relevant feedback on their peers’ writing. The inclusion of formative information, i.e. explanations and suggestions, varied between the groups and between the genres. In terms of learning, it was especially the macro-level of writing that benefitted from giving feedback, as the pupils paid attention to paragraphing and the content of their texts, among other things. The intervention was inspired by genre pedagogies, and the pupils in the second study who wrote texts in three different genres presented an emergent genre awareness. As regards micro-level aspects of writing, the pupils self-reported improved ability to proofread their own texts from having read and commented on peers’ writing.

    The pedagogical discussion of the findings highlights the roles of genre pedagogy, feedback training, criteria, and the pupils in relation to my results and to pupil involvement in assessment-as-learning activities. In conclusion, this thesis suggests that involving pupils as instructional resources for each other and for the teacher requires the advancement of pupils as agents in the classroom practice.

  • 5.
    Berggren, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading for an English academic writing course: what novice students do2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. McGrath, Lisa
    et al.
    Berggren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading EAP: Investigating high proficiency L2 university students’ strategy use through reading blogs2016In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 22, p. 152-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the reading strategies used by academically novice, but high proficiency L2 students of English enrolled in a teacher education programme at a major Swedish university. Data were obtained from personal reading blogs kept by the students as they undertook course reading at home. An analysis revealed that students employed various reading strategies; however, there was limited evidence to suggest that students employed these strategies routinely. The most common strategy reported was connecting to short-term writing task. While students reported reflecting on their reading, they did not appear to amend unsuccessful strategy use, or re-use successful strategies. The study reveals the difficulties and limitations of high proficiency L2 students who lack experience of reading academic literature in English, and discusses pedagogical implications for reading blogs.

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