Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Eriksson, R.
    et al.
    MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, Magnetkameran Ing. 24, Dept. of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, L.
    MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bjerner, T.
    MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ahlstrom, H.
    Ahlström, H., MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Contrast enhancement of manganese-hydroxypropyl-tetraacetic acid, an MR contrast agent with potential for detecting differences in myocardial blood flow2006In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 858-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine whether the contrast agent Mn-HPTA has potential for detecting differences in myocardial blood flow. Materials and Methods: R1 in the myocardium was calculated from MR signal intensity measurements in 18 pigs after intravenous injection of 5, 15, or 25 µmol MnHPTA/kg body weight. Measurements were made in each animal after administration at rest and during dobutamine-induced stress. Results: A difference of approximately 0.1 sec -1 in the R1 increase between rest and stress still remained 31 minutes after administration of 25 µmol MnHPTA/kg body weight. When two consecutive MnHPTA injections were performed, the second injection induced a lower R1 increase than the corresponding first injection. Conclusion: MnHPTA at a dose of 25µmol/kg body weight (b.w.) has the potential to detect perfusion differences in myocardium. When two consecutive injections of MnHPTA were administered, the R1 change after the second injection was affected by the earlier administration. Therefore, a protocol including more than one administration is not ideal for this contrast agent. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 2.
    Frones, S.
    et al.
    Frønes, S..
    Stoen, R.
    Støen, R..
    Gregersen, M.
    Gregersen, M..
    Refsum, H.
    Refsum, H..
    Krane, J.
    Krane, J..
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The iodinated radiographic contrast medium iohexol mimics the vasodilator effect seen with small increases in extracellular K+ in the isolated rabbit central ear artery2006In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 692-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether iodinated radiographic contrast media (IRCM) mimic the hyperpolarizing and vasodilator effects of K + by comparing the vasodilator effect of a transient rise in extracellular K + with that of the IRCM iohexol. Material and Methods: Immersed rabbit central ear arterial rings with and without endothelium and pre-contracted with phenylephrine (PE) were used to investigate the dependency of the endothelium in K + -induced vasodilatation. Perfused rabbit central ear arteries, pre-contracted with PE, were used to study the effects of bolus administrations of the IRCM iohexol or KCl on arterial tone under conditions that mimic those employed during clinical arteriography. Results: A small rise in K + caused an endothelium-independent and ouabain-sensitive relaxation of PE-constricted rabbit central ear artery rings. The relaxation was not changed in the presence of barium. The IRCM iohexol and KCl, injected as boluses into perfused PE-constricted rabbit ear arteries, caused transient decreases in perfusion pressure. Iohexol- and K + -induced pressure decreases were significantly reduced in the presence of 10M ouabain alone or in combination with 30M barium. Neither iohexol- nor K + -induced pressure decrease was significantly changed in the presence of barium alone compared to controls. Conclusion: The vasodilator effect of IRCM mimics the vasodilator effect seen upon small increase in extracellular K + . Under the experimental conditions employed in the present study, a considerable part of the IRCM-induced vasodilatation appears to be due to activation of Na + /K + -ATPase in the smooth muscle cells. © 2006 Taylor and Francis.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Jan O.G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antioxidant activity of mangafodipir is not a new finding [4] (multiple letters)2004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gastrointestinal AEs seen in the POP trial due to SOD mimetic activity of calmangafodipir?2019In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 47, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Karin
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Thelin, Bo
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Ursula G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    First Clinical Experience with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent and Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Mangafodipir as an Adjunct in Cancer Chemotherapy-A Translational Study2012In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P andlt; .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P andlt; .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mangafodipir a Selective Cytoprotectant - with Special Reference to Oxaliplatin and Its Association to Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN)2017In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 641-649Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxaliplatin, in combination with 5-fluorouracil plus folinate (or capecitabine), has increased survival substantially in stage III colorectal cancer and prolonged life in stage IV patients, but its use is compromised because of severe toxicity. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is the most problematic dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin. Oncologists included for years calciumand magnesium infusion as part of clinical practice for preventing CIPN. Results from a phase III prospective study published in 2014, however, overturned this practice. No other treatments have been clinically proven to prevent this toxicity. There is a body of evidence that CIPN is caused by cellular oxidative stress. Clinical and preclinical data suggest that the manganese chelate and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir (MnDPDP) is an efficacious inhibitor of CIPN and other conditions caused by cellular oxidative stress, without interfering negatively with the tumoricidal activity of chemotherapy. MnPLED, the metabolite of MnDPDP, attacks cellular oxidative stress at several critical levels. Firstly, MnPLED catalyzes dismutation of superoxide (O-2(center dot-) ), and secondly, having a tremendous high affinity for iron (and copper), PLED binds and disarms redox active iron/copper, which is involved in several detrimental oxidative steps. A case report from 2009 and a recent feasibility study suggest that MnDPDP may prevent or even cure oxaliplatin-induced CIPN. Preliminary results from a phase II study (PLIANT) suggest efficacy also of calmangafodipir, but these results are according to available data obscured by a surprisingly low number of adverse events and a seemingly lower than expected efficacy of FOLFOX.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Hornberje Holding AS, Sweden.
    May fermented Baltic Sea herring help in conditions of gut disorders, such as gastric catarrh and heartburn?2018In: JOURNAL OF COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE RESEARCH, ISSN 2146-8397, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It has been suggested that disruption of the gut microbiota can be significant with respect to pathological intestinal conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gastric catarrh (GC), and heartburn (HB). Through history, an essential part of the colonization of the human gut took place by ingestion of food preserved by fermentation. The natural replenishment of microbes via food and beverage is today low because food is "sterilized" through boiling, broiling, and pasteurization. Modulating the gut rnicrobiota with fermented food products may hence be considered as a strategy to treat such conditions. Fermented Baltic Sea herring (FBSH) is an example of a Lactobacillus-fermented food product, which was tested in the present study. Methods: A 30-day open study was performed in 42 volunteers with IBS, GC, or HB. Volunteers were recruited by advertisements in daily newspapers. The volunteers were provided with gelatin capsules for the study, each containing approximately 100 mg freeze dried FBSH. They were also provided with forms that contained columns and rows for every test day where the volunteers were ask to fill in number of capsules taken, and to report possible improvements according to a 0-10 scale, where 10 stands for full recovery. Results: The most reported common disorder symptom was IBS and 7 of 14 of these volunteers reported recovery, with a mean recovery of 4.4. All of the 9 volunteers reported recovery from GC, with a mean recovery of 8.4. Five of 6 volunteers reported recovery from HB, with a mean recovery of 6.8. Conclusion: Although the present study is a small open study, the overall results are exciting and merits further studies in volunteers, ideally in a double-blind placebo-controlled manner.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ignarro, Louis J
    Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, USA.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Almén, Torsten
    Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University.
    Calmangafodipir [Ca4Mn(DPDP)5], mangafodipir (MnDPDP) and MnPLED with special reference to their SOD mimetic and therapeutic properties2015In: Drug Discovery Today, ISSN 1359-6446, E-ISSN 1878-5832, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 411-421Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) participate in pathological tissue damage. Mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) normally keeps ROS and RNS in check. During development of mangafodipir (MnDPDP) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, it was discovered that MnDPDP and its metabolite manganese pyridoxyl ethyldiamine (MnPLED) possessed SOD mimetic activity. MnDPDP has been tested as a chemotherapy adjunct in cancer patients and as an adjunct to percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with myocardial infarctions, with promising results. Whereas MRI contrast depends on release of Mn2+, the SOD mimetic activity depends on Mn2+ that remains bound to DPDP or PLED. Calmangafodipir [Ca4Mn(DPDP)5] is stabilized with respect to Mn2+ and has superior therapeutic activity. Ca4Mn(DPDP)5 is presently being explored as a chemotherapy adjunct in a clinical multicenter Phase II study in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Is it possible to draw firm conclusions from the PLIANT trial?2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 6, p. 862-864Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ignarro, Louis J.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Letter in response to: "Randomised open label exploratory, safety and tolerability study with calmangafodipir in patients treated with the 12-h regimen of N acetylcysteine for paracetamol overdosethe PP100-01 for Overdose of Paracetamol (POP) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial"2019In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 20, article id 380Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Kurz, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grant, Derek
    GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Robertson, Towart
    Audacter Consulting, Helensburgh, Scotland.
    De Cesare, Michelandrea
    Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori di Milano, Milano, Italy.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of MnDPDP andICRF-187 on Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicityand Anticancer Activity12012In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 252-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxidative stress participates in doxorubicin (Dx)–induced cardiotoxicity. The metal complex MnDPDP and its metaboliteMnPLED possess SOD-mimetic activity, DPDP and PLED have, in addition, high affinity for iron. Mice wereinjected intravenously with MnDPDP, DPDP, or dexrazoxane (ICRF-187). Thirty minutes later, mice were killed, theleft atria were hung in organ baths and electrically stimulated, saline or Dx was added, and the contractility wasmeasured for 60 minutes. In parallel experiments, 10 μM MnDPDP or MnPLED was added directly into the organbath. The effect of MnDPDP on antitumor activity of Dx against two human tumor xenografts (MX-1 and A2780)was investigated. The in vitro cytotoxic activity was studied by co-incubating A2780 cells with MnDPDP, DPDP,and/or Dx. Dx caused a marked reduction in contractile force. In vivo treatment with MnDPDP and ICRF-187 attenuatedthe negative effect of Dx. When added directly into the bath, MnDPDP did not protect, whereas MnPLEDattenuated the Dx effect by approximately 50%. MnDPDP or ICRF-187 did not interfere negatively with the antitumoractivity of Dx, either in vivo or in vitro. Micromolar concentrations of DPDP but not MnDPDP displayed anin vitro cytotoxic activity against A2780 cells. The present results show that MnDPDP, after being metabolized toMnPLED, protects against acute Dx cardiotoxicity. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments show that cardioprotectiontakes place without interfering negatively with the anticancer activity of Dx. Furthermore, the results suggest thatthe previously described cytotoxic in vivo activity of MnDPDP is an inherent property of DPDP.

    Translational Oncology (2012) 5, 252–259

  • 12.
    Stehr, Jan Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor and Actuator Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof G.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence that fodipir (DPDP) binds neurotoxic Pt2+ with a high affinity: An electron paramagnetic resonance study2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 15813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxaliplatin typically causes acute neuropathic problems, which may, in a dose-dependent manner, develop into a chronic form of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), which is associated with retention of Pt2+ in the dorsal root ganglion. A clinical study by Coriat and co-workers suggests that co-treatment with mangafodipir [Manganese(II) DiPyridoxyl DiPhosphate; MnDPDP] cures ongoing CIPN. These authors anticipated that it is the manganese superoxide dismutase mimetic activity of MnDPDP that explains its curative activity. However, this is questionable from a pharmacokinetic perspective. Another, but until recently undisclosed possibility is that Pt2+ outcompetes Mn2+/Ca2+/Zn2+ for binding to DPDP or its dephosphorylated metabolite PLED (diPyridoxyL EthylDiamine) and transforms toxic Pt2+ into a non-toxic complex, which can be readily excreted from the body. We have used electron paramagnetic resonance guided competition experiments between MnDPDP (10logKML ≈ 15) and K2PtCl4, and between MnDPDP and ZnCl2 (10logKML ≈ 19), respectively, in order to obtain an estimate the 10logKML of PtDPDP. Optical absorption spectroscopy revealed a unique absorption line at 255 nm for PtDPDP. The experimental data suggest that PtDPDP has a higher formation constant than that of ZnDPDP, i.e., higher than 19. The present results suggest that DPDP/PLED has a high enough affinity for Pt2+ acting as an efficacious drug in chronic Pt2+-associated CIPN.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf