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  • 1.
    Czernekova, Michaela
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Charles University, Prague.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Holm, Ingvar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Primary Culture of Tardigrade Storage Cells from Richtersius coronifer Richters, 19032016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coelomocytes are macrophage-like cells in the body cavity or the coelomic spaces of many invertebrates and play major roles in their physiology and immunology. Their structure, function and diversity, however, is still poorly understood.

    Tardigrades are micrometazoans inhabiting a wide variety of environments and with an ability to survive extreme conditions. Coelomocytes (“storage cells”) represent an important part of tardigrade physiology, storing and distributing energy and possibly also having immunological functions. Few studies of tardigrade cell biology have been reported and neither primary nor continuous cell cultures have been established. Tardigrades are normally found and also cultured in an environment rich in microorganisms, some of which may even be of symbiotic value.

    In this study we have tried to establish a primary culture of storage cells in the eutardigrade Richtersius coronifer. Different cell media and concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS) were tested. Extracting cells from the tardigrades in an antiseptical environment is challenging since it has to be done under a microscope and contamination from the tardigrades surface is also a problem. To avoid this we tried culturing with high concentrations of antibiotics and antimycotics. We managed to keep the cells viable for up to 18 days in Grace insect medium with 10 % FBS at 20-22°C. The medium was changed every third day. 10x Antibiotic-Antimycotic and 5x of Penicillin-Streptomycin were used to minimize contamination. These concentrations reduce the bacterial abundance, but contamination with fungi was still an issue. Cell morphology evaluation was performed daily and no obvious toxic effects on the cells was observed. Cell viability and cell division were evaluated with Trypan blue staining and cell counting in a haemocytometer. The results indicate that the cells are viable and that some cell division occurs, however more studies need to be performed to confirm this. Still, this study provides the first evidence that primary cultures of storage cells from tardigrades are possible to establish, but the culturing method has to be refined to avoid contamination.

  • 2.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Holm, Ingvar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Gondikas, Andreas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Manganese inhibits viability of prostate cancer cells2018In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Androgen deprivation therapy is usually in the initial phase a successful treatment for prostate cancer but eventually most patients develop androgen-independent metastatic disease. This study investigated if manganese (Mn) reduces viability of prostate cancer via induction of apoptosis.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145 and LNCaP underwent dose- and time-dependent screening of viability, analyzed by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry was used for the cell-cycle and apoptosis analyses. Intracellular Mn concentration was measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    RESULTS: At Mn concentrations of 200-1000 μM, the effect on viability was most pronounced in PC3 followed by LNCaP cells. These cell lines also showed higher intracellular concentration of Mn compared to DU145. In all cell lines, Mn increased the proportion of cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis.

    CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating Mn as a potential agent in prostate cancer therapy.

  • 3.
    Holm, Ingvar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Hernroth, Bodil
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Miljö, medicin och undervisning, hur hänger det ihop?: exempel från projektet mangan och prostatacancer2018In: Man and Biosphere Health: en komplett akademisk miljö / [ed] Ann-Sofi Rehnstam-Holm, Kristianstad: Högskolan Kristianstad , 2018, p. 16-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskningsmiljön ”Man and Biosphere Health” är engruppering där forskare från helt olika biologiskakunskapsområden träffas och knyter kontakter. Forskning inom området ”Life Science” (Livsvetenskap), som framförallt innefattar biologi, medicin och biokemi, är världens största tvärdisciplinära forskningsområde med studier av biologisktliv samt de förutsättningar som utgör grunden för fortsatt liv. Unikt för samarbetet inom MABH är kombinationen avekologisk och biomedicinsk kompetens, vilket i vårt fall har inneburit att cellbiologisk forskning har knutits ihop med miljöforskning på ett nyskapande sätt.

  • 4.
    Holm, Ingvar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Samverkansinlärning: en modell för att öka genomströmningen i svåra kurser2017In: Högskolepedagogisk debatt, ISSN 2000-9216, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Jönsson, K. Ingemar
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Holm, Ingvar
    Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH). Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Avdelningen för miljö- och biovetenskap.
    Tassidis, Helena
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap. Kristianstad University, Faculty of Natural Science, Research environment Man & Biosphere Health (MABH).
    Cell biology of the tardigrades: current knowledge and perspectives2019In: Evo-Devo: Non-model species in cell and developmental biology / [ed] Tworzydlo W., Bilinski S., Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 231-249Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The invertebrate phylum Tardigrada has received much attention for containing species adapted to the most challenging environmental conditions where an ability to survive complete desiccation or freezing in a cryptobiotic state is necessary for persistence. Although research on tardigrades has a long history, the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in molecular biological (“omics”) studies, most of them with the aim to reveal the biochemical mechanisms behind desiccation tolerance of tardigrades. Several other aspects of tardigrade cell biology have been studied, and we review some of them, including karyology, embryology, the role of storage cells, and the question of whether tardigrades are eutelic animals. We also review some of the theories about how anhydrobiotic organisms are able to maintain cell integrity under dry conditions, and our current knowledge on the role of vitrification and DNA protection and repair. Many aspects of tardigrade stress tolerance have relevance for human medicine, and the first transfers of tardigrade stress genes to human cells have now appeared. We expect this field to develop rapidly in the coming years, as more genomic information becomes available. However, many basic cell biological aspects remain to be investigated, such as immunology, cell cycle kinetics, cell metabolism, and culturing of tardigrade cells. Such development will be necessary to allow tardigrades to move from a nonmodel organism position to a true model organism with interesting associations with the current models C. elegans and D. melanogaster.

  • 6.
    Rosander, Ulla
    et al.
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Rumpunen, Kimmo
    Department of Plant Breeding at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Balsgård.
    Lindmark-Månsson, Helena
    LRF Dairy.
    Paulsson, Marie
    Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University.
    Gullberg, Bo
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University.
    Holm, Ingvar
    Kristianstad University, School of Education and Environment, Avdelningen för Naturvetenskap.
    Nutrient content of consumed elementary school lunches: a pilot study from Sweden2013In: Journal of Child Nutrition & Management, ISSN 1559-5676, Vol. 37, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose/ObjectivesPurpose was to investigate the nutrient content of Swedish school meals consumed by students in the context of national recommendations regarding food composition and intake.

    Methods Composite samples of lunch meals consumed by six students during a five-day period were collected using the double portion method and analyzed for total energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients.

    ResultsThe consumed meals contained lower than recommended levels of energy, protein, omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, vitamin C, folate, and vitamin E, whereas the amount of sodium consumed was too high.

    Applications to Child Nutrition ProfessionalsThe low protein content of students’ diets indicates that more food should be consumed. Students also specifically need to increase their consumption of food rich in omega-3 fatty acids and carbohydrates, while higher intake of vitamin C and vitamin E can be achieved via increased vegetable consumption. Dairy products should be included in the meal or as a supplement in order to ensure sufficient intake of riboflavin, calcium and magnesium. Levels of sodium should be reduced.

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