Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    “At least I can walk” – online re-negotiation of identity in post-stroke aphasia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Social and Health Sciences (HOS).
    DYSLEXI, INTERNET OCH STIGMA: en netnografisk studie av nätbaserad kommunikation hos personer med dyslexi2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Titel (translated from Swedish): Dyslexia, the internet and stigma – a netnographic study of online communication in people with dyslexia

    Author: Helena Taubner

    Supervisor: Åsa Wengelin

    Examinator: Magnus Tideman

    Masters thesis (30 ECTS) in Disability Studies, University of Halmstad, Sweden, spring 2013

    The thesis is written in Swedish.

    Our communication continually changes, and the internet is an important factor in that development. New ways of making writing more efficient, for example the use of abbreviations and special symbols are emerging. We mix written language with photos, films, sound clips and links. Norms for what is considered to be the correct use of language are displaced. When our abilities do not match society’s expectations, stigmatization occurs. This is what happens to a person with dyslexia when the demands placed upon them for their reading and writing abilities become too high. What happens when the communication moves into the online environment? The following three issues are addressed:

    How do individuals with dyslexia communicate online?

    How do individuals with dyslexia relate to their online communication?

    How do individuals with dyslexia control their stigma when communicating online?

    The study is a two-part qualitative case study based upon semi-structured interviews and netnographic shadowing with two informants, Andreas and Linda. The results were analysed with reference to Goffman’s theory of stigma. In spite of the fact that Andreas has greater difficulties with reading and writing than Linda, he experiences less stigma in relation to communication, since he more consciously manages to control his stigma. A crucial factor for both informants is whether or not the online forum is synchronous or asynchronous (it is impossible for them to pass in synchronous forums). Hence, the study suggests that the degree of stigmatization does not necessarily correspond to the degree of difficulties with reading and writing.

  • 3.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Online and offline re-negotiation of identity when living with post-stroke aphasia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Online and offline re-negotiation of self when living with post-stroke aphasia2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aphasia, i.e. language disorder caused by brain injury (most commonly stroke), affects some 10.000 people in Sweden every year, 30% of whom are between 18 and 65. Much has been said about neurological or medical aspects of aphasia, but experiences of people affected are much less studied.

    When living with post-stroke aphasia, the stroke constitutes a boundary between separate phases of life, often evoking an identity crisis and a need of a re-negotiation of self. Considering that 90% of the Swedish working-age population are Internet users, this re-negotiation process will necessarily include online aspects. Nevertheless, research combining aphasia, identity and online communication is scarce. Thus, this study aimed to investigate how working-age Swedish Internet users with post-stroke aphasia re-negotiate their identity, offline and online.

    Method: Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine individuals (three men and six women) living with post-stroke aphasia (all diagnosed R470). At the time of the interviews, they were between 26 and 61 years old. In addition, a total of 1,581 online posts (e.g. photos, videos, text, emoticons) created by the same participants were analysed.

    Results: The analyses indicate that the participants, in their re-negotiation of self, frequently position themselves in relation to other disabilities, e.g. by stating “I am not stupid” or “At least, I can walk”. This positioning varied depending on which points in time (i.e. pre-stroke, acute phase, rehabilitation, post-stroke) were taken into account.

    Conclusion: Whereas some of the participants struggled to maintain a representation of themselves similar to their pre-stroke identity, some proudly embraced aphasia as a new aspect of their identity. Furthermore, they seemed to have better opportunities to control the renegotiation process in online settings than offline.

  • 5.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Online communication as improved stigma management in post-stroke aphasia2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As in most developed countries, a large majority of the Swedish population are Internet users. Within the working-age population, the percentage is >90. Hence a large extent of the literacy practices and identity construction of Swedish people take place online. The increasing importance of being able to read and write is a challenge for people living with an acquired language disorder, such as aphasia (affecting some 10.000 individuals in Sweden every year). Linguistic practices are important mediating tools for identity construction. Aphasia can therefore be understood not only as (partially) losing one’s language and literacy skills per se, but also as being deprived of one’s identity. However, this is rarely taken into account in aphasia rehabilitation, and research combining aphasia, identity and online communication practices is scarce.

    Aim: The aim of the current study is to examine how working-age Swedish Internet users with post-stroke aphasia construct their identity online.

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with nine Swedish individuals (aged 26-61, three men and six women) with post-stroke aphasia. In addition, a total of >2000 online posts (e.g. photos, videos, text, emoticons) made by the same participants were collected.

    Results: Analyses of the data, based on Goffman’s theory of stigma management, indicated that the participants made active choices whether to display or hide their aphasia online. Some of them proudly displayed their difficulties (e.g. by posting their medical record, or posting texts with errors) while others made efforts to hide them (e.g. by sharing texts written by others instead of writing themselves, or preferring emoticons or the like-button over commenting in writing), thus creating a difference between their offline and online identity. Offline, this kind of stigma management was less available to them.

    Conclusion: A possible conclusion is that the participants’ online literacy practices to a large extent aimed at controlling who knew what about them, i.e. to control their stigma by presenting different identities in different contexts. It appears as if the participants consider the Internet, with its wide range of communication tools (including pictures, like-buttons, emoticons), a better arena for stigma management than their offline practices.

  • 6.
    Taubner, Helena
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Online re-negotiation of identity in post-stroke aphasia2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Taubner, Helena
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Hallén, Malin
    Halmstad University, School of Health and Welfare, Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport (CVHI), The Wigforss Group.
    Wengelin, Åsa
    Department of Swedish, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Signs of aphasia: Online identity and stigma management in post-stroke aphasia2017In: Cyberpsychology : Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, ISSN 1802-7962, E-ISSN 1802-7962, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate online strategies for re-negotiating identity, in terms of stigma management, developed by working-age Swedish Internet users with post-stroke aphasia, i.e., acquired language impairment caused by brain injury. Interviews were conducted with nine individuals (aged 26-61, three men and six women) with post-stroke aphasia. In addition, a total of 1,581 screenshots of online posts (e.g., photos, videos, text, emoticons) created by the same participants were collected. Drawing on social semiotics (specifically the three dimensions of online communication mentioned by Kress (2003), i.e., composition, content and context) and Goffman’s theory of stigma (1963, specifically the concepts of stigma management and passing), qualitative thematic analysis was performed. Regarding composition, three themes emerged: Relying on others or technology, Beyond speaking and writing, and Controlling speed and timing. The participants rarely posted content about aphasia, but some of them used the Internet to raise awareness. Different online contexts had different meaning to the participants in terms of identity. Being open about the aphasia in one forum did not imply the same behaviour in another forum (e.g., dating sites). For the participants to pass (Goffman, 1963), should they want to, they needed to control all three dimensions. If the context or the composition revealed the stigma, controlling the content was not enough to pass. The multimodality of the Internet enabled the participants to manage their stigma in a variety of ways and to choose whether to be perceived as persons with aphasia or not. © 2017, Masaryk University. All rights reserved.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf