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  • 1.
    Buehler, Stefan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Östman, S.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Melsheimer, C.
    Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Bremen.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    John, V.O.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Blumenstock, T.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Hase, F.
    Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung Karlsruhe.
    Ekgered, G.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Earth and Space Sciences.
    Raffalski, U.
    Swedish Institute of Space Physics / Institutet för rymdfysik.
    Nasuno, T.
    Research Institute for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama.
    Satho, M.
    Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo.
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mendrok, Jana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    A multi-instrument comparison of integrated water vapour measurements at a high latitude site2012In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 12, no 22, 10925-10943 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compare measurements of integrated water vapour (IWV) over a subarctic site (Kiruna, Northern Sweden) from five different sensors and retrieval methods: Radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS), ground-based Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, ground-based microwave radiometer, and satellite-based microwave radiometer (AMSU-B). Additionally, we compare also to ERA-Interim model reanalysis data. GPS-based IWV data have the highest temporal coverage and resolution and are chosen as reference data set. All datasets agree reasonably well, but the ground-based microwave instrument only if the data are cloud-filtered. We also address two issues that are general for such intercomparison studies, the impact of different lower altitude limits for the IWV integration, and the impact of representativeness error. We develop methods for correcting for the former, and estimating the random error contribution of the latter. A literature survey reveals that reported systematic differences between different techniques are study-dependent and show no overall consistent pattern. Further improving the absolute accuracy of IWV measurements and providing climate-quality time series therefore remain challenging problems.

  • 2.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Kuhn, Thomas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Stengel, M.
    Iturbe-Sanchez, F.
    Johnston, M.
    Systematic and random errors between collocated satellite ice water path observations2013In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 118, no 6, 2629-2642 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There remains large disagreement between IWP in observational datasets, largely because the sensors observe different parts of the ice particle size distribution. A detailed comparison of retrieved IWP from satellite observations in the Tropics ({plus minus}30{degree sign} latitude) in 2007 is made using collocated measurements. The DARDAR IWP dataset, based on combined Radar/Lidar measurements, is used as a reference as it provides arguably the best estimate of the total column IWP. For each dataset, usable IWP dynamic ranges are inferred from this comparison. IWP retrievals based on solar reflectance measurements, MODIS, and AVHRR-based CMSAF, and PATMOS-x, were found to be correlated with DARDAR over a large IWP range (~20-7000 g/m-2;). The random errors of the collocated datasets have a close to log-normal distribution, and the combined random error of MODIS and DARDAR is less than a factor of 2, which also sets the upper limit for MODIS alone. In the same way the upper limit for the random error of all considered datasets is determined. Datasets based on passive microwave measurements,MSPPS, MiRS, and CMO, are largely correlated with DARDAR for IWP values larger than approximately 700 g/m². The combined uncertainty between these datasets and DARDAR in this range is slightly less MODIS-DARDAR, but the systematic bias is nearly an order of magnitude.

  • 3.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Microwave and infrared remote sensing of ice clouds: measurements and radiative transfer simulations2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis considers the combination of multiple instruments for remote sensing of the Earth atmosphere from space. The primary focus is on remote sensing of atmospheric ice. Ice clouds are important for the Earth’s radiation budget, but their properties are difficult to measure and therefore poorly known. A better quantification of ice clouds is needed to improve global climate models. This thesis introduces the reader to the subject and describes how to combine measurements and radiative transfer simulations in an attempt to improve our understanding. A major part of this work is the development of a toolkit to find co-incident measurements, or collocations, between any pair of down-looking satellite sensors. Firstly, this toolkit is used to collocate passive microwave and thermal infrared sensors on meteorological satellites with the Cloud Profiling Radar on CloudSat. With the resulting collocated dataset, the Ice Water Path (IWP) signal in passive thermal radiation is studied and an improved IWP retrieval is presented. The toolkit is also used to better characterise the bias between different copies of passive microwave radiometers on-board polar-orbiting operational satellites. For the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), version 2, an optimised frequency grid for infrared broadband simulations is shown to be applicable for cloudy simulations. This frequency grid can and will be used to study the IWP signal in thermal infrared radiances. An outlook on a comparison between collocations and simulations is presented in the thesis.

  • 4.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Remote sensing of ice clouds: synergistic measurements and radiative transfer simulations2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis primarily considers the spaceborne remote sensing of ice clouds and frozen precipitation. Ice clouds are important for hydrology and for the Earth’s radiation budget, but many properties are difficult to measure, in particular using spaceborne instruments. A better quantification of ice clouds is needed to improve global climate models. This thesis presents steps toward such an improvement.The first part of the thesis introduces topics related to the research presented in the second part, but presents no new scientific results. It gives a brief introduction to the history of atmospheric remote sensing and describes how the different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can be used actively or passively. Then, it describes why ice clouds are important and what microphysical, optical, and macrophysical properties are used to describe atmospheric ice. Next, it briefly introduces the relevant topics in atmospheric radiative transfer. The first part concludes with a description of various approaches to retrievals, with a particular focus on those applied in this thesis.The second part of the thesis describes new results. The bulk of the new results is described in five peer-reviewed publications, that are appended verbatim.A major part of the work builds on the development of a toolkit to easily find co-incident measurements, or collocations, between any pair of satellite sensors. Four appended articles rely on this toolkit.The first appended article uses the toolkit to obtain collocations between passive microwave and infrared on operational meteorological satellites with the Cloud Profiling Radar on CloudSat. It presents three examples. Firstly, from the collocated dataset and a dataset of synthetic profiles, the article compares the statistical relations between an official CloudSat Ice Water Path (IWP) product and microwave radiances. Secondly, it shows a point-by-point comparison between the same CloudSat IWP product, and an IWP product based on passive microwave. A more sophisticated set of systematic comparisons, including more satellites and sensors, is presented in a dedicated paper. Finally, the first paper provides a first preview of how the collocations can be used to train a new IWP retrieval from passive operational measurements. This too is the topic of a dedicated paper, where solar, terrestrial infrared, and microwave radiances are combined to obtain an improved IWP product from passive operational sensors, by training with an active combined radar-lidar product from CloudSat-CALIPSO.The second appended article also relies on the collocations toolkit. Here, collocations between different copies of identical or very similar microwave sounders are used to assess how the inter-satellite bias depends on radiance and latitude.The remaining two studies described in the thesis do not use existing measurements, but are based on radiative transfer modelling. One attached paper verifies that optimised frequency grids obtained in clear-sky simulations for terrestrial infrared instrument studies, can be applied directly for cloudy simulations. This result is relevant for future studies. Finally, the thesis includes a short study with retrieval simulations for a new sub-millimetre instrument concept.

  • 5.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mendrok, Jana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Kottayil, Ajil
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Optimised frequency grids for infrared radiative transfer simulations in cloudy conditions2012In: Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, ISSN 0022-4073, E-ISSN 1879-1352, Vol. 113, no 16, 2124-2134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows that radiometer channel radiances for cloudy atmospheric conditions can be simulated with an optimised frequency grid derived under clear-sky conditions. A new clear-sky optimised grid is derived for AVHRR channel . For HIRS channel 11 and AVHRR channel 5, radiative transfer simulations using an optimised frequency grid are compared with simulations using a reference grid, where the optimised grid has roughly 100–1000 times less frequencies than the full grid. The root mean square error between the optimised and the reference simulation is found to be less than 0.3 K for both comparisons, with the magnitude of the bias less than 0.03 K. The simulations have been carried out with the radiative transfer model Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), version 2, using a backward Monte Carlo module for the treatment of clouds. With this module, the optimised simulations are more than 10 times faster than the reference simulations. Although the number of photons is the same, the smaller number of frequencies reduces the overhead for preparing the optical properties for each frequency. With deterministic scattering solvers, the relative decrease in runtime would be even more. The results allow for new radiative transfer applications, such as the development of new retrievals, because it becomes much quicker to carry out a large number of simulations. The conclusions are applicable to any downlooking infrared radiometer.

  • 6. Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rydberg, B.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Radio and Space Science, Gothenburg.
    Jiménez, C.
    Laboratoire d'Etude du Rayonnement et de la Matière en Astrophysique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Observatoire de Paris.
    Collocating satellite-based radar and radiometer measurements: methodology and usage examples2010In: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, ISSN 1867-1381, E-ISSN 1867-8548, Vol. 3, no 3, 693-708 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collocations between two satellite sensors are occasions where both sensors observe the same place at roughly the same time. We study collocations between the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on-board NOAA-18 and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on-board CloudSat. First, a simple method is presented to obtain those collocations and this method is compared with a more complicated approach found in literature. We present the statistical properties of the collocations, with particular attention to the effects of the differences in footprint size. For 2007, we find approximately two and a half million MHS measurements with CPR pixels close to their centrepoints. Most of those collocations contain at least ten CloudSat pixels and image relatively homogeneous scenes. In the second part, we present three possible applications for the collocations. Firstly, we use the collocations to validate an operational Ice Water Path (IWP) product from MHS measurements, produced by the National Environment Satellite, Data and Information System (NESDIS) in the Microwave Surface and Precipitation Products System (MSPPS). IWP values from the CloudSat CPR are found to be significantly larger than those from the MSPPS. Secondly, we compare the relation between IWP and MHS channel 5 (190.311 GHz) brightness temperature for two datasets: the collocated dataset, and an artificial dataset. We find a larger variability in the collocated dataset. Finally, we use the collocations to train an Artificial Neural Network and describe how we can use it to develop a new MHS-based IWP product. We also study the effect of adding measurements from the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS), channels 8 (11.11 mu m) and 11 (8.33 mu m). This shows a small improvement in the retrieval quality. The collocations described in the article are available for public use

  • 7.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rydberg, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Radio and Space Science, Gothenburg.
    Jiménez, Carlos
    LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France.
    Collocating satellite-based radar and radiometer measurements –: methodology and usage examples2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rydberg, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Radio and Space Science, Gothenburg.
    Jiménez, Carlos
    Laboratoire d'Etude du Rayonnement et de la Matière en Astrophysique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Observatoire de Paris.
    Collocating satellite-based radar and radiometer measurements: methodology and usage examples2011In: Proceedings of the ESA Living Planet Symposium, European Space Agency, ESA , 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collocations between two satellite sensors are occasions where both sensors observe the same place at roughly the same time. We study collocations between the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on-board NOAA-18 and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on-board CloudSat. We present some statistical properties of the collocations. For 2007, we find approximately two and a half million MHS measurements with CPR pixels close to their centrepoints. We present some possible applications. We use the collocations to validate an operational Ice Water Path (IWP) product from MHS measurements, produced by the National Environment Satellite, Data and Information System (NESDIS) in the Microwave Surface and Precipitation Products System (MSPPS). IWP values from the CloudSat CPR are found to be significantly larger than those from the MSPPS. Finally, we use the collocations to train an Artificial Neural Network and describe how we can use it to develop a new MHS-based IWP product. The collocations described in the article are available for public use.

  • 9.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rydberg, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Radio and Space Science, Gothenburg.
    Jiménez, Carlos
    LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France.
    Collocating satellite-based radar and radiometer measurements: methodology and usage examples2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Rydberg, Bengt
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Radio and Space Science, Gothenburg.
    Jiménez, Carlos
    LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France.
    Hunting ice clouds: quantifying ice from passive infrared and microwave measurements by collocating with the CloudSat radar2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Holl, Gerrit
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Eliasson, Salomon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Mendrok, Jana
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    SPARE-ICE: Synergistic ice water path from passive operational sensors2014In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 119, no 3, 1504-1523 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents SPARE-ICE, the Synergistic Passive Atmospheric Retrieval Experiment-ICE. SPARE-ICE is the first Ice Water Path (IWP) product combining infrared and microwave radiances. By using only passive operational sensors, the SPARE-ICE retrieval can be used to process data from at least the NOAA 15 to 19 and MetOp satellites, obtaining time series from 1998 onward. The retrieval is developed using collocations between passive operational sensors (solar, terrestrial infrared, microwave), the CloudSat radar, and the CALIPSO lidar. The collocations form a retrieval database matching measurements from passive sensors against the existing active combined radar-lidar product 2C-ICE. With this retrieval database, we train a pair of artificial neural networks to detect clouds and retrieve IWP. When considering solar, terrestrial infrared, and microwave-based measurements, we show that any combination of two techniques performs better than either single-technique retrieval. We choose not to include solar reflectances in SPARE-ICE, because the improvement is small, and so that SPARE-ICE can be retrieved both daytime and nighttime. The median fractional error between SPARE-ICE and 2C-ICE is around a factor 2, a figure similar to the random error between 2C-ICE ice water content (IWC) and in situ measurements. A comparison of SPARE-ICE with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Pathfinder Atmospheric Extended (PATMOS-X), and Microwave Surface and Precipitation Products System (MSPPS) indicates that SPARE-ICE appears to perform well even in difficult conditions. SPARE-ICE is available for public use.

  • 12.
    John, Viju O
    et al.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Allen, Richard P.
    Department of Meteorology, University of Reading.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Parker, David E.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Soden, Brian J.
    Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami.
    Clear-sky biases in satellite infrared estimates of upper tropospheric humidity and its trends2011In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use microwave retrievals of upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) to estimate the impact of clear-sky-only sampling by infrared instruments on the distribution, variability, and trends in UTH. Our method isolates the impact of the clear-sky-only sampling, without convolving errors from other sources. On daily time scales, IR-sampled UTH contains large data gaps in convectively active areas, with only about 20-30 % of the tropics (30 degrees S-30 degrees N) being sampled. This results in a dry bias of about -9 % RH in the area-weighted tropical daily UTH time series. On monthly scales, maximum clear-sky bias (CSB) is up to -30 % RH over convectively active areas. The magnitude of CSB shows significant correlations with UTH itself (-0.5) and also with the variability in UTH (-0.6). We also show that IR-sampled UTH time series have higher interannual variability and smaller trends compared to microwave sampling. We argue that a significant part of the smaller trend results from the contrasting influence of diurnal drift in the satellite measurements on the wet and dry regions of the tropics.

  • 13.
    John, Viju O.
    et al.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Atkinson, Nigel
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Monitoring scan asymmetry of microwave humidity sounding channels using simultaneous all angle collocations (SAACs)2013In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 118, no 3, 1536-1545 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simultaneous all angle collocations (SAACs) of microwave humidity sounders (AMSU-B and MHS) on-board polar orbiting satellites are used to estimate scan-dependent biases. This method has distinct advantages over previous methods, such as that the estimated scan-dependent biases are not influenced by diurnal differences between the edges of the scan and the biases can be estimated for both sides of the scan. We find the results are robust in the sense that biases estimated for one satellite pair can be reproduced by double differencing biases of these satellites with a third satellite. Channel 1 of these instruments shows the least bias for all satellites. Channel 2 has biases greater than 5 K, thus needs to be corrected. Channel 3 has biases of about 2 K and more and they are time varying for some of the satellites. Channel 4 has the largest bias which is about 15 K when the data are averaged for 5 years, but biases of individual months can be as large as 30 K. Channel 5 also has large and time varying biases for two of the AMSU-Bs. NOAA-15 (N15) channels are found to be affected the most, mainly due to radio frequency interference (RFI) from onboard data transmitters. Channel 4 of N15 shows the largest and time varying biases, so data of this channel should only be used with caution for climate applications. The two MHS instruments show the best agreement for all channels. Our estimates may be used to correct for scan-dependent biases of these instruments, or at least used as a guideline for excluding channels with large scan asymmetries from scientific analyses.

  • 14.
    John, Viju O.
    et al.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Candy, Brett
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Saunders, Roger W.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Perker, David E.
    Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter.
    Understanding intersatellite biases of microwave humidity sounders using global simultaneous nadir overpasses2012In: Journal of Geophysical Research, ISSN 0148-0227, E-ISSN 2156-2202, Vol. 117, D02305- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs) of polar-orbiting satellites are most frequent in polar areas but can occur at any latitude when the equatorial crossing times of the satellites become close owing to orbital drift. We use global SNOs of polar orbiting satellites to evaluate the intercalibration of microwave humidity sounders from the more frequent high-latitude SNOs. We have found based on sensitivity analyses that optimal distance and time thresholds for defining collocations are pixel centers less than 5 km apart and time differences less than 300 s. These stringent collocation criteria reduce the impact of highly variable surface or atmospheric conditions on the estimated biases. Uncertainties in the estimated biases are dominated by the combined radiometric noise of the instrument pair. The effects of frequency changes between different versions of the humidity sounders depend on the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. There are significant scene radiance and thus latitude dependencies in the estimated biases and this has to taken into account while intercalibrating microwave humidity sounders. Therefore the results obtained using polar SNOs will not be representative for moist regions, necessitating the use of global collocations for reliable intercalibration.

  • 15.
    Kottayil, Ajil
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Buehler, Stefan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    John, Viju O.
    UK Met Office, Exeter.
    Miloshevich, Larry M.
    Milo Scientific LLC, Lafayette, Colorado.
    Milz, Mathias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    Holl, Gerrit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Space Technology.
    On the importance of Vaisala RS92 radiosonde humidity corrections for a better agreement between measured and modeled satellite radiances2012In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, ISSN 0739-0572, E-ISSN 1520-0426, Vol. 29, no 2, 248-259 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study has been carried out to assess the importance of radiosonde corrections in improving the agreement between satellite and radiosonde measurements of upper-tropospheric humidity. Infrared [High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS)-12] and microwave [Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-18] measurements from the NOAA-17 satellite were used for this purpose. The agreement was assessed by comparing the satellite measurements against simulated measurements using collocated radiosonde profiles of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program undertaken at tropical and midlatitude sites. The Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) was used to simulate the satellite radiances. The comparisons have been done under clear-sky conditions, separately for daytime and nighttime soundings. Only Vaisala RS92 radiosonde sensors were used and an empirical correction (EC) was applied to the radiosonde measurements. The EC includes correction for mean calibration bias and for solar radiation error, and it removes radiosonde bias relative to three instruments of known accuracy. For the nighttime dataset, the EC significantly reduces the bias from 0.63 to −0.10 K in AMSU-18 and from 1.26 to 0.35 K in HIRS-12. The EC has an even greater impact on the daytime dataset with a bias reduction from 2.38 to 0.28 K in AMSU-18 and from 2.51 to 0.59 K in HIRS-12. The present study promises a more accurate approach in future radiosonde-based studies in the upper troposphere.

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