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  • 1.
    Safaric, Luka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Shakeri Yekta, Sepehr
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    Ejlertsson, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB.
    Safari, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadali Najafabadi, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB.
    Ometto, Francesco
    Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB.
    Svensson, Bo H
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Björn, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center.
    A Comparative Study of Biogas Reactor Fluid Rheology: Implications for Mixing Profile and Power Demand2019In: Processes, ISSN 2227-9717, Processes, ISSN 2227-9717, Vol. 7, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an established process for integrating waste management with renewable energy and nutrient recovery. Much of the research in this field focuses on the utilisation of new substrates, yet their effects on operational aspects such as fluid behaviour and power requirement for mixing are commonly overlooked, despite their importance for process optimisation. This study analysed rheological characteristics of samples from 21 laboratory-scale continuous stirred-tank biogas reactors (CSTBRs) digesting a range of substrates, in order to evaluate substrate effect on mixing efficiency and power demand through computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results show that substrate and process parameters, such as solids content and organic loading, all have a significant effect on CSTBR fluid rheology. The correlation levels between rheological and process parameters were different across substrates, while no specific fluid behaviour patterns could be associated with substrate choice. Substrate should thus be considered an equally important rheology effector as process parameters. Additional substrate-related parameters should be identified to explain the differences in correlations between rheological and process parameters across substrate groups. The CFD modelling revealed that the rheology differences among the AD processes have significant implications for mixing efficiency and power demand of the CSTBRs, highlighting the importance of considering the substrate-induced effects on CSTBR rheology before including a new substrate.

  • 2.
    Whitton, Rachel
    et al.
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Ometto, Francesco
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Villa, Raffaella
    De Montfort Univ, England.
    Pidou, Marc
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Jefferson, Bruce
    Cranfield Univ, England.
    Influence of light regime on the performance of an immobilised microalgae reactor for wastewater nutrient removal2019In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 44, article id UNSP 101648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microalgae immobilised within a resin shaped into beads have demonstrated the ability to remediate nutrients from wastewater effluents within hydraulic retention times as low as 3 h. Methods to further optimise performance consider parameters relating to the bead with the impact of external conditions seldom investigated. Light is an essential parameter for microalgal growth with its effect on suspended cultures well documented. This work explores the influence of light on nutrient remediation by immobilised microalgae in order to recommend an optimal lighting solution for an immobilised microalgae technology based on Scenedesmus obliquus encapsulated within calcium-alginate beads. White light (400-700 nm) at a photon flux density (PFD) of 200 mu mol.m(-2).s(-1) was determined optimal when illuminating a packed bed configuration. When considering phosphate, these conditions supported a remediation rate of 10.7 ( +/- 0.01) mgP.h (-1).10(6) beads(-1) in comparison to 10.2 ( +/- 0.01) and 10.1 ( +/- 0.01) mgP.h(-1) .10(6) beads(-1) for the blue (465 nm) and red (660 nm) spectra respectively. Although similar performance was demonstrated, light transmission trials determined white light to penetrate to greater bed depths resulting in a larger photoactive zone. A PFD of 200 mu mol.m(-2).s(-1) was regarded as optimal when considering performance, attenuation depth and effective use of total supplied light. In addition, photoperiods trials determined lighting periods amp;lt; 12 h extended the overall treatment time.

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