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  • 1. Alex-Petersen, Jesper
    et al.
    Lundborg, Petter
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Long-term effects of childhood nutrition: evidence from a school lunch reform2018Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2. Bharadwaj, Prashant
    et al.
    Bietenbeck, Jan
    Lundborg, Petter
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Birth weight and vulnerability to a macroeconomic crisis2019Ingår i: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 66, s. 136-144Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper shows that early-life health is an important determinant of labor market vulnerability during macroeconomic downturns. Using data on twins during Sweden's crisis of the early 1990s, we show that individuals with higher birth weight are differentially less likely to receive unemployment insurance benefits after the crisis as compared to before it, and that this effect is concentrated among workers in the private sector. While differences in early-life health thus lead to increased inequality in employment outcomes, we also find that there is no differential effect of birth weight on total income after the crisis. This suggests that in the context of Sweden, the social safety net is able to mitigate the effects of early-life health on labor market outcomes during economic downturns. 

  • 3. Bharadwaj, Prashant
    et al.
    Lundborg, Petter
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Birth Weight in the Long Run2018Ingår i: The Journal of human resources, ISSN 0022-166X, E-ISSN 1548-8004, Vol. 53, nr 1, s. 189-231Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the effect of birth weight on long-run outcomes using data on Swedish twins born between 1926 and 1958 linked to administrative records spanning entire life-time labor market histories. We find that birth weight positively affects permanent income and income across large parts of the lifecycle. The timing of the birth weight–income relationship is in line with the role of birth weight in determining takeup of sickness benefits and morbidity. The effect of birth weight on labor market outcomes even for cohorts born 30 years apart are similar; for short run health outcomes, birth weight plays a decreasing role over time.

  • 4. Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Job Search Methods and Wages: Are Natives and Immigrants Different?2018Ingår i: Manchester School, ISSN 1463-6786, E-ISSN 1467-9957, Vol. 86, nr 2, s. 219-247Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We conduct a survey of newly hired workers in the Swedish labour market to analyse if there are differences between natives and immigrants in the choice of search intensity/methods and in the search method getting the job. We further investigate if the wage and other characteristics of the new job differ depending on the successful search method. We find that immigrants use all search methods more than natives, but they especially rely on informal search. Immigrants are more likely than natives to find a job using informal search through friends and relatives, and these jobs are associated with lower wages.

  • 5. Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Reshid, Abdulaziz Abrar
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Neighborhood signaling effects, commuting time, and employment: Evidence from a field experiment2018Ingår i: International journal of manpower, ISSN 0143-7720, E-ISSN 1758-6577, Vol. 39, nr 4, s. 534-549Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether there is unequal treatment in hiring depending on whether a job applicant signals living in a bad (deprived) neighborhood or in a good (affluent) neighborhood.

    Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted a field experiment where fictitious job applications were sent to employers with an advertised vacancy. Each job application was randomly assigned a residential address in either a bad or a good neighborhood. The measured outcome is the fraction of invitations for a job interview (the callback rate).

    Findings - The authors find no evidence of general neighborhood signaling effects. However, job applicants with a foreign background have callback rates that are 42 percent lower if they signal living in a bad neighborhood rather than in a good neighborhood. In addition, the authors find that applicants with commuting times longer than 90 minutes have lower callback rates, and this is unrelated to the neighborhood signaling effect.

    Originality/value - Empirical evidence of causal neighborhood effects on labor market outcomes is scant, and causal evidence on the mechanisms involved is even more scant. The paper provides such evidence.

  • 6. Dahl, Gordon B.
    et al.
    Kotsadam, Andreas
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    Does integration change gender attitudes? The effect of randomly assigning women to traditionally male teams2018Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7. Lundborg, Petter
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anton
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI). Linnaeus University, Sweden; IZA, Germany.
    The health-schooling relationship: evidence from Swedish twins2016Ingår i: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 1191-1215Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Health and education are known to be highly correlated, but the mechanisms behind the relationship are not well understood. In particular, there is sparse evidence on whether adolescent health may influence educational attainment. Using a large registry dataset of twins, including comprehensive information on health status at the age of 18 and later educational attainment, we investigate whether health predicts final education within monozygotic (identical) twin pairs. We find no evidence of this and conclude that health in adolescence may not have an influence on the level of schooling. Instead, raw correlations between adolescent health and schooling appear to be driven by genes and twin-pair-specific environmental factors.

  • 8. Lundborg, Petter
    et al.
    Nordin, Martin
    Rooth, Dan Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutet för social forskning (SOFI).
    The intergenerational transmission of human capital: the role of skills and health2018Ingår i: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 1035-1065Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide new evidence on some of the mechanisms reflected in the intergenerational transmission of human capital. Applying both an adoption and a twin design to rich data from the Swedish military enlistment, we show that greater parental education increases sons' cognitive and non-cognitive skills, as well as their health. The estimates are in many cases similar across research designs and suggest that a substantial part of the effect of parental education on their young adult children's human capital works through improving their skills and health.

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