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  • 1.
    Matscheck, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Att skapa former och arenor: Lokal samverkan inom psykiatri/socialpsykiatri2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration in the area of mental health involves organizations and professional roles with their basis in differing laws and guidelines, organizational structures and theoretical and professional foundations. The aim of this study is to examine the structures and processes involved in collaboration between the social service and providers of psychiatric care.

    Drawing on organizational theory concerning the nature of collaboration and factors which can hinder or assist successful collaboration, a case study has been constructed examining collaboration between a local psychiatric clinic in the region of Stockholm and the social service in a local community. The organizations concerned belong to different administrative and political sectors and involve professionals with various specialties such as psychiatrists, social welfare secretaries, nurses, psychologists, counsellors, occupational therapists and others. A study of formal agreements and routines for collaboration, evaluations and other forms of documentation, in combination with an interview study of persons with different professional roles in each respective organization, reveals the importance of a commitment to support collaboration from the management of each organization and the systematic creation and upholdning of meeting places for the various professions in order to support and facilitate cooperation concerning individual clients and patients.

  • 2.
    Matscheck, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Evidensbaserad metod eller praktisk verksamhet? Supported employment utan IPS2019In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence-based method or practical support for users? Supported Employment without IPS

    Since the Mental Health Reform of 1995, the social service in Sweden is required to offer ”meaningful activities” to persons with mental health impairments. This requirement has usually been met by the social service’s ”daily activities” centres, which do not have contact with the competitive labour market. ”Supported Employment” (SE) is a method which can be used to help people with mental health, neuropsychiatric or intellectual impairments to regular work places. Based on international research, the SE model ”Individual Placement and Support” (IPS) is recommended in national guidelines as an evidence-based method. However, IPS can be difficult to implement, since the model requires integrated teams, while in the Swedish system health care, social service and vocational rehabilitation belong to different sectors. Another reason is that subsidized forms of employment and internship are more usual in Sweden than in many other countries. This study investigates SE practices in three municipalities which do not follow all of the IPS model’s eight ”basic principles”. The results show that after 18 months many persons who had been totally without regular activities, or had access only to a daily activities centre, had some form of work or internship at regular workplaces. Twenty per cent had paid employment. The author interprets IPS as a ”packaging” of SE which the municipalities have ”translated” locally to offer SE activities which benefit users. This can also be seen as evidence-based practice (EBP), in which the best available research has been combined with the wishes of users and the professionals’ judgement of what is possible to offer in practice. Further research is needed concerning the value for users of prolonged internships which do not lead to paid employment.

  • 3.
    Matscheck, David
    et al.
    Department (FoU Nordost), Region Stockholm, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Runo
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Arenas for contact: A study of local collaboration in mental health2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 93-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration in the field of mental health involves institutions with differing organizational structures and belonging to different administrative and political authorities. The institutions concerned include professionals with such varying roles as physicians, nurses, psychologists, social welfare secretaries, occupational therapists, home support personnel and others.

    The purpose of this article is to describe and analyse how different psychiatric and social services in a Swedish municipality can collaborate, in spite of obvious differences in organizational forms, legislative and administrative mandates, professional backgrounds and perspectives. A study of formal agreements and procedures for collaboration and other forms of documentation, in combination with an interview study of persons with different occupational roles in each respective organization, shows the importance of a comprehensive strategy based on a holistic view of the diverse needs of individual patients and clients. Such a strategy requires an overall structure including not only written agreements and procedures, but also arenas for meetings at all levels of the organizations involved, in which the role of leadership is to solidify the structure for collaboration and support individual professionals working in collaboration to provide care and service for individual patients or clients.

  • 4.
    Matscheck, David
    et al.
    FoU Nordost [RD Northeast], Danderyd, Sweden.
    Berg Eklundh, Lotta
    FoU Nordost [RD Northeast], Danderyd, Sweden.
    Does BBIC Make a Difference? Structured Assessment of Child Protection and Support2015In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 193-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessments of children in need in Sweden have been criticized for inadequate investigation and documentation and for not allowing children enough participation. In an effort to achieve greater systematization and to make assessments more ‘child-centred’, the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare has sanctioned the development of BBIC (Children’s Needs in Focus). BBIC is inspired by the ‘Framework for Assessment of Children in Need’ used in England and Wales. In a study of BBIC in seven municipalities, method triangulation was used. A quantitative file study, evaluating written assessments, was complemented by a survey study and interviews with practitioners who conduct assessments. The results show improved, though uneven, illumination of the child’s needs in assessments and some improvement concerning the parents’ capacity to meet the child’s needs. More relevant information was also collected concerning the child’s family situation and environment, and there were more contacts made with collaborative partners. The results show clear tendencies to greater focus on the child. Social workers found that BBIC leads to better assessments, though at the expense of increased administration.

  • 5.
    Matscheck, David
    et al.
    FoU Nordost, Danderyd, Sverige.
    Fleetwood, Christina
    Nordic School of Public Health, Sverige.
    Samverkan kring missbruk och beroende2013In: Om samverkan: för utveckling av hälsa och välfärd / [ed] Runo Axelsson, Susanna Bihari Axelsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 133-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Matscheck, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ljungberg, Amanda
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Beyond formalized plans: User involvement in support in daily living - users' and support workers' experiences2019In: International Journal of Social Psychiatry, ISSN 0020-7640, E-ISSN 1741-2854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    User involvement, based on respect and carried out through dialogue, has been shown to lead to increased self-respect, self-confidence and positive identity. In Sweden, the Social Service Act requires that interventions be designed and implemented together with the individual concerned. The basic criterion for social support is prolonged severe mental illness (usually at least 6 months), with no criteria for specific diagnosis or institutional history. The most common form of social support is ‘support in daily living’, a community care intervention for people aged 18 years or older who have their own homes and living arrangements.

    Aim:

    This article aims to deepen our understanding of user involvement at the individual level in the provision of an ongoing social work intervention. What elements of user involvement can be found in users’ and support workers’ descriptions of helpful support in daily living?

    Method:

    Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 users, who had experienced support in daily living as helpful, and 16 interviews with the users’ support workers.

    Results:

    Three major, interconnected themes emerged: Constant dialogue; Framing the flexibility, in relation to formalized intervention plans and regulations; The importance of ‘small things’, decisions concerning daily life.

    Conclusion:

    Both users and support workers described user involvement at the individual, micro-level to be an integral part of helpful support in daily living. It was possible to create a space for dialogue and co-creation in which users were involved in formulating and deciding the contents of their support at an informal level, to influence their own everyday lives. While a formal framework of rules, restrictions and plans surrounds meetings between users and professionals, a facilitating factor may be the absence of too detailed plans and regulations, leaving trust to users and professionals and their capacity to manage most of the choices they have to make.

  • 7.
    Matscheck, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. FoU Nordost [RD Northeast], Danderyd, Sweden.
    Piuva, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, Lisbeth
    Åberg, Martin
    The Coordinated Individual Plan – is this a solution for complex organizations to handle complex needs?2019In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persons with mental health problems and substance abuse often have complex needs requiring many kinds of help concurrently. In Sweden, an attempt has been made to counterbalance the effects of fragmentation by means of legislation on collaboration, requiring on the individual level the use of Coordinated Individual Plans (Sw. Samordnad Individuell Plan, SIP). The aim of the study is to explore collaboration as it is indicated in SIP and other case documentation with focus on how SIP is motivated, and what kind and degree of collaboration is indicated by the documentation. 12 individual case files have been studied in six local authorities and the results have been analyzed in relation to a regional collaboration agreement and local collaboration agreements. The results show unclear motivation for SIP and that SIP is primarily used for documentation of short-term planning. Use of SIP and participation in SIP appears also to be uneven. The authors characterize SIP as an unsystematic form of interagency meeting, with documentation indicating a relatively low to moderate level of collaboration. The authors question whether SIP is an optimal form for collaboration and suggest that more distinct models such as case management or multidisciplinary teams could be more effective.

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