Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Borjesson, Marcus
    et al.
    Swedish Def Univ, Sweden; Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Karlstad Univ, Sweden; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Davis, Paul
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Flotation REST as a Stress Reduction Method: The Effects on Anxiety, Muscle Tension, and Performance2018In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL SPORT PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of flotation REST upon skilled and less skilled golfers anxiety in terms of physiological indicators of stress, self-rated anxiety scores, muscle tension, and the effect on golf putting. Prior to performing the putting task participants underwent a treatment of flotation REST or a period of resting in an armchair. Participants completed both treatments in a randomized order with a two-week interval. The results showed that both flotation REST and the armchair treatment reduced systolic blood pressure and heart rate, with no differences between treatments or athlete skill levels. No significant differences between treatments were revealed regarding self-ratings, level of muscle tension or putting precision. The results indicate that flotation REST may be useful for reducing negative symptoms related to stress and anxiety in general; however, no support for direct positive effects on golf performance were found.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Andreas
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Coaching Behaviour Scale for Sport (CBS-S): A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study validated a Swedish version of the 47‐item Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS‐S). Sample 1 consisted of 506 team sport athletes [262 men and 244 women; mean age: 22.20, standard deviation (SD) = 3.90] distributed across 41 coaches at the two highest national levels of various sports. Athletes completed the CBS‐S and established questionnaires of coaching behaviors (LSS), self‐confidence (CSAI‐2R), and coach–athlete relationship (CART‐Q). An additional sample of 39 basketball players (21 men and 18 women; mean age = 17.40, SD = 2.39) completed the CBS‐S twice, approximately 4 weeks apart. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable model fit for the seven‐factor version of the CBS‐S, although two items of the negative personal rapport subscale displayed insufficient factor loadings. Correlations between the subscales of the CBS‐S and established instruments were in accordance with theoretical expectations, supporting the concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha (> 0.82) for all dimensions provided support for the reliability of the CBS‐S, and test‐retest correlations indicated moderate stability over time. Cultural differences in the assessment of coaching behaviors and the usability of the CBS‐S by coaches for self‐reflection and development are discussed.

  • 3.
    Davis, Paul
    et al.
    Univ Umea, Sweden.
    Halvarsson, Anton
    Univ Umea, Sweden.
    Lundstrom, Wictor
    Univ Umea, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alpine Ski Coaches and Athletes Perceptions of Factors Influencing Adaptation to Stress in the Classroom and on the Slopes2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research examining the student-athlete experience proposes a number of factors that can be both sources of stress and/or support. The dual career pathway offers a number of potential positive outcomes including psychological, social, and financial benefits; however, challenges including time management, fatigue, and restricted social activities are well documented. In consideration of the multidimensional student-athlete experience and the numerous factors that influence the complexity of potential stress, a mixed methods research study design was used in the study. First, data collected from surveys completed by 173 elite junior alpine skiers were analyzed to identify the degree to which athletes report experiencing stress associated with specific aspects pertaining to training, life, and organizational factors. These factors were then explored through semi-structured interviews with six coaches at the associated national elite sport schools. Taken collectively, athletes reports of psychophysiological training stress on the Multidimensional Training Distress Scale were low. Scores on the college studentathletes life stress scale revealed very low levels of general life stress; although the subscales associated with "performance demand" and "academic requirements" scored marginally higher. Scores on the Organizational Stressor Indicator for Sport Performers indicated low levels of organizational stress. The interviews with coaches elucidated the underlying factors potentially influencing athletes positive adaptations to stress as they reported programming a number of strategies to reduce negative outcomes. Coaches aimed to teach athletes self-awareness and regulation strategies through the use of the training diaries and ongoing communication to promote positive adaptation to stress. A number of coaches also worked with sport psychology consultants to optimize athletes training and study situations. Traditionally, research has noted high levels of stress in student-athletes due to co-occurring demands (school amp; sport); however, the data in the present study suggests that optimizing support mechanisms across domains can promote positive adaptations to potential sources of stress.

  • 4.
    Davis, Paul
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Halvarsson, Anton
    Umeå University.
    Lundström, Wictor
    Umeå University.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    EXAMINING ALPINE COACHES’ AND ATHLETES’ PERCEPTIONS OF ADAPTATIONS TO STRESS IN THE CLASSROOM AND ON THE SLOPES2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Prevalence of burnout in adolescent athletes2007In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 21, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the factorial validity of the Eades Burnout Inventory (EABI) and the prevalence of burnout in adolescent elite athletes and whether burnout is more common in individual sports than in team sports. The EABI was distributed to 980 athletes (402 females and 578 males) in 29 different sports. Confirmatory-factor analyses revealed an acceptable factorial validity for a theoretically supported four-factor model of the EABI. Between 1% and 9% of the athletes displayed elevated burnout scores on these four subscales. The hypothesis of higher prevalence of burnout in individual sports was, however, not supported. Furthermore, no correlation between training load and burnout scores was found. These findings suggest that factors other than training load must be considered when athletes at risk for burnout are investigated.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Durand-Bush, Natalie
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    The process of burnout: A multiple case study of three elite endurance athletes2007In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, Vol. 38, p. 388-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the process of burning out in endurance athletes. The experiences of three elite cross-country skiers who left their sport due to burnout were explored. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and inductively analyzed. The Athlete Burnout Questionnaire and training logs were used to validate the interviews and to enrich the analysis. The burnout process was found to evolve with different severity and time perspectives in the three cases. Athletic identity and achievement strivings to validate self-esteem were found to be important driving forces in the burnout process. Also, chronic lack of mental and physical recovery as well as early skiing success leading to high expectations comprised common themes in the burnout process.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    University of St Andrews, UK.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Conceptual confusion and potential advances in athlete burnout research2016In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, ISSN 0031-5125, E-ISSN 1558-688X, Vol. 123, no 3, p. 784-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 30 years of research on athlete burnout has yielded important insights and questions regarding the onset, nature, and consequences of this detrimental syndrome. Not surprisingly, burnout is considered an important matter, both from a research and practical standpoint. We comment on the work of Ryu, Ali, Kim, Choi, and Radlo, who examined the impact of burnout on cognitive performance among athletes.

  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för pedagogiska studier, Idrottsvetenskap, Karlstads universitet.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstads universitet.
    Working with perfectionism in elite sport: A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy perspective2016In: Perfectionism in Sport, Dance and Exercise / [ed] Andrew Hill, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 203-221Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Swedish Olympic Committee, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Swedish Olympic Committee, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tod, David
    Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
    Cognitive behavioral intervention in sport psychology: A case illustration of the exposure method with an elite athlete2016In: Journal of Sport Psychology in Action, ISSN 2152-0704, E-ISSN 2152-0712, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One common method in Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) to treat anxiety problems is exposure, but there are few articles examining its applicability to sport. The aim of this article is to give a background of the use of exposure in sport and present a case of how exposure can be used with athletes. The athlete was a 17-year-old female cross-country skier with high levels of performance anxiety. In the case description, common procedures in CBT such as behavioral analysis, psychoeducation, and exposure are presented, as well as how anxiety can be managed. After the intervention the athlete perceived lower levels of anxiety as well as improved behavioral repertoire (e.g., less avoidant behaviors and more functional sport-specific behaviors). This case may be used to help practitioners consider the use of exposure in competitive sports.

  • 10.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Mid Sweden University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Skoog, Therese
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Podlog, Leslie
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 640-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

    Methods

    Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15–19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

    Results

    Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

    Conclusion

    The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome.

  • 11.
    Hassmén, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Raglin, J.S
    Indiana Universiity Bloomington, USA.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Intra-individual variability in state anxiety and self-confidence in elite golfers2004In: Journal of Sport Behavior, ISSN 0162-7341, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Precompetition anxiety levels are assumed to moderate athletic performance. Unfortunately, cross-sectional and nomothetic research designs have often shown non-significant findings; intra-individual variability may be a contributing factor. The extent of variability in precompetition anxiety and self-confidence responses as related to golf performance and trait measures were therefore examined using an idiographic approach. Individual patterns of variability were found for Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety and Self-Confidence scores yielded prior to the games played. Variability in Somatic Anxiety was significantly related to variability in golf performance. Players low in anxiety variability scored significantly higher on Private Self-Consciousness. The findings suggest the influence of anxiety and self-confidence on performance may be better understood when trait characteristics of the individual are also considered.

  • 12.
    Johansson, Susanne
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sexual harassment and abuse in coach-athlete relationships in Sweden2017In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 117-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual harassment and abuse (SHA) can have a profound negative impact, but research on SHA in sport is scarce and studies of SHA in Swedish sport are absent. This study explores (a) self-reported prevalence of SHA perpetrated by coaches among male and female Swedish athletes, and (b) descriptive statistics for coach–athlete relationship factors and the association between these relationship factors and reported SHA. Current and former Swedish club sport athletes (n = 477) aged 25 participated in the survey. Athletes reported 5.5% prevalence of coach SHA, of which inappropriate, unpleasant, or offensive physical contact were most common. No significant differences of SHA frequency were displayed across gender, sport performance levels, or individual/team sports. A majority of athletes (55–95%) reported trust, closeness, substantial coach influence over sport performance, and instructional physical contact as main coach–athlete relationship factors. A minority (13–39%) reported dependency, substantial coach influence over personal-life, non-instructional physical contact, sexualized comments and jokes, and flirting. Prevalence of coach–athlete friendships, athlete attraction to coaches, and coaches’ instructional physical contact differed significantly between male and female athletes. Closeness and athlete attraction to coaches were negatively related, and coaches’ non-instructional physical contact and flirting were positively related to reported SHA. Multi-causality and ambiguity of coach–athlete relationship factors are discussed.

  • 13.
    Kenttä, Göran
    et al.
    Enheten Prestation och träning, Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjurner, Pontus
    KBT Psykologerna Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bättre prestation och hälsa med KBT: Fakta, inspiration, fallbeskrivningar2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När livet och idrotten fungerar som bäst mår man fint och prestationsförmågan är på topp. I detta drömläge är behovet av KBT, kognitiv beteendeterapi, mycket litet. Men det är få förunnat att befinna sig i detta läge tjugofyra timmar om dygnet – varken hälsa eller prestationsförmåga är någonting statiskt.

    Bättre prestation & hälsa med KBT ger en introduktion till KBT och de vanligast förekommande problemområdena som finns förankrade i såväl den kliniska psykologin som i ett idrottsspecifikt sammanhang. Du får flera beskrivningar och exempel på hur behandlingar kan gå till väga.

  • 14.
    Klockare, Ellinor
    et al.
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Davis, Paul
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, UK.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Sweden.
    Track and field athletes’ experiences and perceived effects of flotation-Rest: An interpretative phenomenlogical analysis2015In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 409-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has highlighted flotation-REST as a promising method for relaxation and performance enhancement in sport; however, to further evaluate the use of flotation-REST in an athletic environment, additional research is warranted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six elite track and field athletes about their experiences and perceived effects of flotation-REST. Athletes were interviewed twice; once for their immediate response and again to explore their perceptions of flotation-REST over time. The data was analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Flotation-REST was perceived as pleasant and relaxing. Five athletes reported less stress and an overall increase in well-being for one or two days afterwards, although they felt physically tired during training sessions. Being in a better mood, placing fewer demands on themselves, and feeling more optimistic and present were also perceived effects. This study shows the potential of flotation-REST as a technique for health promotion, stress management, and a means to practise mindfulness.

  • 15.
    Lundkvist, Erik
    et al.
    Performance and Training Unit, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden / Department of Coaching and Psychology, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Gerber, Marcus
    Sport Science Section, Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    Centre of Research on Welfare, Health and Sport, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Madigan, Daniel J.
    School of Sport, York St John University, York, United Kingdom.
    Commentary: Early Risk Detection of Burnout: Development of the Burnout Prevention Questionnaire for Coaches2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, p. 1-3, article id 714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent volume of this journal, Schaffran et al. (2019) introduced the Burnout Prevention Questionnaire for Coaches (BPQ-C). Although we recognize the worthwhile efforts of Schaffran et al., we believe that there are several issues associated with this instrument. This commentary aims to expand on why we think the BPQ-C should not currently be used by practitioners and researchers to screen for burnout.

  • 16.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology.
    A case of career ending depression in elite sport: Beyond self-rated symptoms of “mental health disorders”.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Well-being in competitive sports – the feel-good factor?: A review of conceptual considerations in well-being research2011In: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1750-984X, E-ISSN 1750-9858, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper summarizes the topic of well-being as it applies to competitive athletes, with a particular focus on definitional and conceptual issues. Established definitions within research on human happiness and flourishing based on the hedonic and eudaimonic perspectives are contrasted against definitions applied within sport psychology. The majority of the reviewed sport psychology studies either failed to define well-being or used a variety of labels to describe the construct (e.g., subjective well-being, psychological well-being, mental well-being). A large number of assessments have been used to assess well-being among athletes, but most were applied with only a weak theoretical rationale and did not distinguish between well-being at the global and sport levels. It is concluded that well-being studies within sport psychology have been hampered by conceptual ambiguity, which makes it difficult to compare results across studies and generalize findings in order to develop a sound theoretical base of knowledge. Future research needs to more explicitly define the conceptual framework of well-being and the level (global or context-specific) on which the construct is investigated. Toward this goal, an integrated model is presented to provide a conceptual well-being structure in sport studies, and future directions for research are discussed.

  • 18.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Fakulteten för humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Institutionen för pedagogiska studier, Idrottsvetenskap, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Optimism and hope in sport2018In: Positive psychology in sport and physical activity: an introduction / [ed] Abbe Brady & Bridget Grenville-Cleave, London: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 78-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Hassmén, Peter
    School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Competitive State Anxiety Inventory –2 (CSAI-2): Evaluating the Swedish version by confirmatory factor analyses2005In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 23, p. 727-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) is one of the most frequently used instruments when assessing competitive state anxiety in sport psychology research. However, doubts have been expressed about the factorial validity of both the English and the Greek versions of the scale. Hence, a revised version of the inventory (CSAI-2R) has recently been suggested to be more psychometrically sound (Cox et al., 2003). In the present study, the aim was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the CSAI-2 using confirmatory factor analyses. A total of 969 athletes (571 men and 398 women) competing in 26 different sports completed the Swedish version of the CSAI-2. Three different factor structures were evaluated: the original three-factor model (with cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety and self-confidence), a two-factor model in which self-confidence was excluded, and a three-factor model containing 17 items (CSAI-2R). The results revealed that only the 17-item model displayed an acceptable fit to the data. Although some doubts remain about the amount of variance that can be attributed to error variance in the subscales, the results suggest that it is better to use the CSAI-2R rather than the original CSAI-2.

  • 20.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Enheten Prestation och träning, Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Emotionernas betydelse för återhämtning och tillämpning av emotionella mätinstrument inom idrotten2008In: Idrottarens återhämtningsbok: Fysiologiska, psykologiska och näringsmässiga fakta för snabb och effektiv återhämtning / [ed] Göran Kenttä & Michael Svensson, Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2008, p. 343-358Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Sweden.
    Positive emotions are not simply the absence of the negative ones: Development and validation of the Emotional Recovery Questionnaire (EmRecQ)2010In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 24, p. 468-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Emotional Recovery Questionnaire (EmRecQ) and to describe athletes’ individual response patterns in five repeated assessments using the EmRecQ. Three samples were used. Samples 1 and 2 consisted of 192 and 379 (Mean age 16.4 years, SD = 0.7 and Mean age: 17.0 years, SD = 1.1) elite athletes from different sports. The third sample consisted of 20 (Mean age: 21.3, SD = 19.0) female elite basketball players. The EmRecQ is a 22-item questionnaire that assesses Happiness, Security, Harmony, Love, and Vitality. Results showed acceptable weighted omega reliability and construct reliability. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the a priori specified five-factor correlated model. Case profiles of repeated assessments revealed individual response patterns of the separate EmRecQ subscales that corresponded well with rated training load and total quality of recovery. The findings provide support for the EmRecQ’s psychometric properties and applied usefulness.

  • 22.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raglin, J.S
    Indiana University‐Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
    Directional anxiety responses in elite and sub-elite young athletes: Intensity of anxiety symptoms matter2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 853-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to examine the differences in anxiety ratings of elite and sub‐elite athletes when the relationship between intensity and direction scores of anxiety ratings is considered in analyses. Participants were 31 junior elite (Mean age: 17.7, SD=1.1) and 53 sub‐elite (Mean age: 17.5, SD=1.1) cross country skiers and swimmers who completed the direction modified CSAI‐2R before important competitions. Results showed that elite athletes rated a higher percent of items as facilitative to their performance whereas sub‐elite athletes rated a higher percent of items as debilitative. No significant differences between the elite and sub‐elite samples were displayed regarding rated direction scores of cognitive or somatic anxiety at moderate to high‐intensity levels. A significant difference in facilitative anxiety ratings was displayed at a low anxiety intensity level (Z=−2.20, P<0.05). Outcome performance data showed no consistent congruence with athletes' anxiety direction ratings. The findings suggest that facilitative direction scores are a consequence of low anxiety intensity, possibly combined with high self‐confidence levels. Directional anxiety researchers analyzing separate total scores of intensity and direction respectively, which is the traditional approach, may draw incorrect conclusions about the importance of facilitative ratings of anxiety symptoms.

  • 23.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raglin, John S.
    Indiana University-Bloomington, Bloomington, USA.
    The relationship of basic need satisfaction, motivational climate and personality to well-being and stress patterns among elite athletes: An explorative study2015In: Motivation and Emotion, ISSN 0146-7239, E-ISSN 1573-6644, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 237-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether need satisfaction, need dissatisfaction, motivational climate, perfectionism and self-esteem relate to athletes’ discrete profiles of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being and perceived stress. Participants were 103 elite active orienteers (49 men and 54 women; mean age = 22.3 ± 4.4) who clustered into three distinctive well-being and stress patterns: Cluster 1 (lower well-being/higher stress; n = 26), Cluster 2 (higher well-being/lower stress; n = 39), and Cluster 3 (moderate well-being/moderate stress; n = 36). Cluster 1 and 2 constituted distinct well-being/stress profiles and differed significantly (p < .01) in mastery-oriented climate, need satisfaction, need dissatisfaction, perfectionistic concerns and self-esteem scores. A discriminant analysis showed these five variables to correctly assign 88 % of Cluster 1 and 2 participants into their respective groups, although mastery-oriented climate was revealed as a less influential indicator (function loading <.40). The substantial function loading of need dissatisfaction supports the importance of assessing both need satisfaction and dissatisfaction as they contribute uniquely to well-being.

  • 24.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Well-being in elite sport: Dimensions of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being among elite orienteers at a global and sport specific level2014In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined subjective (SWB), psychological (PWB) and social well-being (Social WB) at a global and sport contextual level among ten elite orienteers (6 women and 4 men, median age = 20.4, range 18–30) by employing semistructured interviews. Athletes described SWB as an interplay of satisfaction with life, sport experiences and perceived health combined with experienced enjoyment and happiness in both ordinary life and sport. SWB and PWB interacted, and important psychological functioning among the elite athletes included, among other things, abilities to adopt value-driven behaviors, be part of functional relationships, and to self-regulate one’s autonomy. The ability to organize and combine ordinary life with elite sport, and the use of strategies to protect the self during setbacks was also emphasized. For a comprehensive theoretical understanding of well-being applicable to elite athletes, the need for a holistic view considering both global and sport-specific aspects of WB is discussed.

  • 25.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stahl, Linda
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kentta, Goran
    Swedish Sch Sport and Hlth Sci, Sweden.
    Thulin, Ulrika
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a mindfulness intervention for Paralympic leaders prior to the Paralympic Games2018In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an evaluation of the effectiveness of an applied mindfulness intervention for stress reduction delivered to Paralympic leaders prior to the Paralympic Games. The intervention group of Swedish Paralympic leaders (n=10) received a mindfulness intervention of eight web-based seminars, while a Norwegian reference group (n=6) received no intervention. Three assessments were performed for both samples: at baseline, post-intervention and six weeks post-intervention. The evaluation indicated intervention effects of higher psychological flexibility (p=.03), less rumination (p=.02) and lower perceived stress (p=.001), and offers initial support for the applied usefulness of a web-based mindfulness training program as a supplement in stress-reduction programs for elite sport leaders. General challenges from an applied sport psychology perspective related to the implementation of mindfulness interventions in samples with experienced high levels of stress and perceived time-constraints are discussed.

  • 26. Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Träff, Malin
    Brady, Abbe
    St Mary´s University, Twickenham, London.
    Quality of life in elite sports.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Marie
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Development and initial validation of the NyTid Test: A movement assessment tool for compulsory school pupils2015In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the development process and initial validation of the NyTid test, a process-oriented movement assessment tool for compulsory school pupils. A sample of 1,260 (627 girls and 633 boys; mean age of 14.39) Swedish school children participated in the study. In the first step, exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) were performed in Sample 1, consisting of one third of the participants. The EFA indicated that the 17 skills in the test could be reduced to 12 and divided into four factors. In the second step, the suggested factor structure was cross-validated with confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) in the larger Sample 2. The NyTid test adopts a holistic perspective in which qualitative criteria offer an alternative approach to product-oriented measurement. The study confirms that the NyTid test is a valid process-oriented assessment tool designed for typically developed children aged 12 and 16.

1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf