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  • 1.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Africa’s Food Security under the Shadow of the Russia-Ukraine Conflict2022In: The Strategic Review for Southern Africa, ISSN 1013-1108, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has emerged as an exogenous shock to global food supply chains, which foreshadows worrying impacts on Africa’s food security and nutrition, and threaten to derail national and global efforts to end hunger and poverty and to achieve sustainable development goals on the continent. This article provides an early assessment of the implications of the invasion for Africa’s food supply chains and food security. Two particularly aggravating factors, which explain the current and likely future impact of the invasion on Africa’s food security are discussed: the timing of the invasion and the two parties involved in the conflict. The article underlines four major channels by which the invasion disrupts African food supply chains: energy markets and shipping routes, availability and prices of agricultural production inputs, domestic food price inflation, and trade sanctions and other financial measures. In addition, the article considers the risk of social and political unrest that disruption to food supply chains and spikes in domestic food prices may inflame. Finally, the paper briefly discusses options for short- and long-term responses by African governments and their development partners to mitigate the repercussions of the conflict on food supply chains, boost food and nutrition security, and build resilience of Africa’s food systems

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  • 2.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Climate Change and Migration in North Africa: Projections, Impacts, and Implications for Adaptation2022Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This policy brief takes a regional perspective based on a rapid review of the extant literature to cascading climate risks and their links with migration in North Africa. Understanding the climate-migration nexus in the context of North Africa is a cornerstone for taking informed decisions and developing strategies to mitigate the adverse impact of climate change, including potential human mobility.

  • 3.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Egypt’s food system under a perfect storm2023Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Russia's invasion of Ukraine jeopardizes food security in Africa: shocks to global food supply chains could lead to social and political unrest2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Apart from being a humanitarian tragedy, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has also emerged as an exogenous shock to global food supply chains, with severe consequences for many African countries in particular. Four months into the invasion, we can see three main threats to food security in Africa: a disruption to energy markets and shipping routes; a shortage of fertilizers; and the negative ‘third-party’ effects of sanctions imposed on and by Russia.

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  • 5.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Transforming Higher Agricultural Education for Sustainable Food Systems in Egypt: Insights from an Erasmus+ Project2023In: Youth Commitment to Sustainable Food Systems: A Mediterranean Overview, Paris: International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM) , 2023, 41, p. 44-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary of the key messages: The following policy recommendations can help moving government and society in Egypt towards a transformation in the higher agricultural education (HAE) system to advance food system sustainability:

    1. HAE institutions in Egypt should develop better strategic alignment to the national strategic priorities for agricultural development, and strengthen linkages with stakeholders, employers, and the productive sectors in order to make the expected contribution to national agricultural innovation systems.

    2. HAE institutions should consider setting up innovative mechanisms for monitoring the jobmarket and adapting their curricula in response to changing employment opportunities and technological advances. In connection with this, there is a need for increasing work practice programmes and career training by offering trainings or internships to students to gain more skills and experience for the future job market.

    3. HAE institutions need to move away from a mere transfer of information to the development of students’ skills in accessing and applying available information for solving sustainability issues within the food system. Therefore, system thinking and interdisciplinary approaches towards HAE are needed to consider the entire food system and treat dimensions of food system sustainability as an “indivisible whole”.

    4. HAE programmes and curricula should be designed in ways that provide students with knowledge in different fields and from across disciplines in relation to food system sustainability, since transformation towards a more sustainable food system in practice requires integrated knowledge and understanding of science, economics, the environment and social values. Especially, HAE institutions must incorporate the concepts of sustainability and social responsibility into all HAE programmes and curricula in order to root the ideas and values of sustainable agriculture into students.

    5. A transition towards sustainability in the food system requires HAE institutions to have acadre of educators with a new mindset and the relevant knowledge and pedagogic skills to provide students with up-to-date scientific knowledge and practical skills that increase their technical expertise and ability to apply knowledge in practice and adopt new and creative solutions to food system challenges.

    6. Egyptian HAE institutions need to open themselves up towards international sources of knowledge and strengthen their partnerships and collaborations with international universities. Developing such partnerships can help Egyptian HAE institutions promote access to quality academic programmes, strengthen inter-regional, inter-cultural exchange and collaboration to create and reconfigure human capital and provide more capacity for research and teaching.

    7. Making these shifts in policy stance operational requires reformed institutional frameworks, high-level political commitment and an inclusive vision of a sustainable food system. More flexible HAE policies and practices through modifying institutional governance structures for greater institutional flexibility and increased responsiveness to stakeholders are crucial.

  • 6.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Boqvist, Sofia
    Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Editorial: Livestock Systems in Urbanizing Environments: Impacts and Implications for Food Security in Developing Countries2022In: Frontiers in Veterinary Science, E-ISSN 2297-1769, Vol. 9, article id 966044Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 7.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    COVID-19 risk perception and public compliance with preventive measures: Evidence from a multi-wave household survey in the MENA region2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0283412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the association between individuals’ concern about contracting COVID-19 and their compliance with recommended preventive and mitigation measures, namely wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and handwashing, in the context of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The empirical analysis is based on a panel dataset from the Combined COVID-19 MENA Monitor Household Survey, which was carried out in Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Egypt. Applying a probit estimation technique, a positive and statistically significant association was found between the level of COVID-19 worries and individuals’ compliance with the mitigation measures. Notably, the results revealed that this association followed a “first-up-then-down” trend, showing that compliance with the three mitigation measures rose as individuals’ worries about contracting the virus increased, and then markedly decreased after they had been infected. Socio-demographic characteristics contributing to lower levels of compliance included being male, being over 60, having lower levels of education and having a lower household income. A cross-country analysis revealed remarkable differences between the five countries, with the strongest association between COVID-19 concerns and adherence to mitigation measures observed in Tunisia and Sudan, and the weakest association seen in Jordan and Morocco. Policy implications are outlined for effective risk communication and management during disease outbreaks and public health emergencies to encourage appropriate public health behaviours.

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  • 8.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Environment for Development Group, University of Gothenburg .
    Risk prevention and public compliance in MENA during the disease outbreaks: Takeaways from the Covid-19 pandemic2023In: Economic Research Forum (ERF), no 2023-10-31, p. 8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Public health measures introduced in early 2020 to curb the spread of Covid-19 played a critical role in mitigating the worst effects of the pandemic. This column highlights how to understand the effectiveness of these policies in MENA, and the importance of evaluating the relationship between risk perception and compliance. People’s risk perception and attitudes towards the disease varied over time and between countries, and assessing the drivers of these variations, and how they affected levels of compliance, is vital for understanding what happened and for building resilience to future crises in the region. 

  • 9. Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Elsayied, Mohamed
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    COVID-19 risk perception and food security in the MENA region: evidence from a multi-wave household survey2024In: Food Security, ISSN 1876-4517, E-ISSN 1876-4525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    The COVID-19 pandemic had disruptive consequences for MENA countries’ agri-food value chains that exacerbated poverty and jeopardized food security. This study examines the relationship between individuals’ perception of contracting COVID-19 and their experience of food insecurity, using longitudinal data from the Combined COVID-19 MENA Monitor Household survey. It also investigates the underlying mechanisms of COVID-19 concerns and explores coping strategies employed by households to identify vulnerabilities in food security. The results provide compelling evidence of a strong association between individuals’ concern about the virus and various dimensions of food security, particularly reduced purchasing power and decreased meal frequency. Notably, this association follows an inverted U-shaped curve, with food insecurity initially increasing as worry grows, but declining after individuals contract the virus. High levels of concern were also linked to significant income decreases and worsening economic conditions. Moreover, individuals with higher concerns were more likely to rely on specific coping strategies, particularly spending savings and obtaining funds from relatives or friends. These findings underscore the need for government interventions during disease outbreaks and economic downturns to focus on alleviating individuals’ worry and fear to facilitate informed decision-making that minimizes food insecurity consequences. Additionally, the findings emphasize the need to strengthen social protection systems during public health and economic challenges to ensure food security for vulnerable populations. 

  • 10.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Mensah-Amuakwa, Franklin
    Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lagerkvist, Carl Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Who moves and who gains from internal migration in Egypt?: Evidence from two waves of a labor market panel survey2022In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Vol. 124, article id 102573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, Egypt has experienced rapid internal migration movements triggered by urbanization, socioeconomic development, and environmental changes. From a literature perspective, few scholarly studies have empirically examined the drivers and welfare impacts of internal migration in Egypt, despite the increasing recognition of its inextricably links to urban sustainability. The present study utilized data from two waves of an Egyptian Labor Market Panel Survey (ELMPS) conducted in 2012 and 2018 and consisting of 63,909 observations to examine factors that determine internal migration decisions and their subsequent welfare effects. The results of the two-stage Heckman selection model indicate that both the determinants of internal migration decisions and welfare outcomes differ appreciably depending on migration stream as well as the socioeconomic characteristics of the migrants. In particular, females were found to be more likely to migrate from rural to urban areas, lending support to the growing literature on the “feminization of migration” in developing countries. The OLS regression results, after correcting for self-selection, make a strong case for the positive welfare gains from internal migration in Egypt. Specially, we found that the welfare gains for older and female migrants are much higher than other age and gender groups. A comparison of the welfare effects between different migration streams shows that all migratory movements were associated with positive and statistically significant welfare gains, except for rural-to-urban migration that was surprisingly found to be associated with significant welfare loss for the migrants. Urban-to-urban migration was found to have the strongest welfare enhancing effects on all migrant groups. The empirical findings underline a number of research and policy implications for a sustainable management of internal migration in Egypt and other countries with similar internal migration trends.

  • 11.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden;Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden;Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Mensah-Amuakwa, Franklin
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Who moves and who gains from internal migration in Egypt?: Evidence from two waves of a labor market panel survey2022In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Vol. 124, article id 102573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, Egypt has experienced rapid internal migration movements triggered by urbanization, socioeconomic development, and environmental changes. From a literature perspective, few scholarly studies have empirically examined the drivers and welfare impacts of internal migration in Egypt, despite the increasing recognition of its inextricably links to urban sustainability. The present study utilized data from two waves of an Egyptian Labor Market Panel Survey (ELMPS) conducted in 2012 and 2018 and consisting of 63,909 observations to examine factors that determine internal migration decisions and their subsequent welfare effects. The results of the two-stage Heckman selection model indicate that both the determinants of internal migration decisions and welfare outcomes differ appreciably depending on migration stream as well as the socioeconomic characteristics of the migrants. In particular, females were found to be more likely to migrate from rural to urban areas, lending support to the growing literature on the “feminization of migration” in developing countries. The OLS regression results, after correcting for self-selection, make a strong case for the positive welfare gains from internal migration in Egypt. Specially, we found that the welfare gains for older and female migrants are much higher than other age and gender groups. A comparison of the welfare effects between different migration streams shows that all migratory movements were associated with positive and statistically significant welfare gains, except for rural-to-urban migration that was surprisingly found to be associated with significant welfare loss for the migrants. Urban-to-urban migration was found to have the strongest welfare enhancing effects on all migrant groups. The empirical findings underline a number of research and policy implications for a sustainable management of internal migration in Egypt and other countries with similar internal migration trends.

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  • 12.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Owusu-Sekyere, Enok
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension & Rural Development, University of Pretoria, South Africa; Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Esmat, Abou-Rehab
    Department of Agricultural Economics, Al-Azhar University, Assiut, Egypt.
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: Perceived risks, management strategies and emerging opportunities for small and medium agri-food enterprises in a developing country2023In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, E-ISSN 2212-4209, article id 104045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Covid-19 pandemic has posed unprecedented challenges to small and medium agri-food enterprises (SMAEs) in developing countries. However, research investigating what risks Covid-19 posed to these firms, how they responded, and what business opportunities emerged to SMAEs from the pandemic remains scanty. Drawing on a sample of 166 specialist SMAEs in Egypt, this study addressed these entwined questions by using multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC) and mediation analysis. Our results point out that the Covid-19 pandemic exposed Egyptian SMAEs to complex and multidimensional risks, and caused profound effects on both upstream and downstream stages of their supply chains. In general, Egyptian SMAEs adopted a ‘wait-and-see’ approach to cope with such Covid-19 risks and impacts, which was attributed to their lack of sufficient financial resources to develop risk management strategies and formalize structures to deal with unexpected events. Interestingly, the results showed that several business opportunities emerged from pandemic; but SMAEs' resource disadvantages constrained their capacity to seize and exploit these opportunities. Moreover, we found that mitigation strategies adopted by SMAEs present a mediating factor between perceived Covid-19 risks and perceived business opportunities. Overall, our findings call for a paradigm shift in relation to enterprise risk management in developing countries' SMAEs toward more holistic frameworks to enhance their preparedness to future shocks, make mature operational and strategic management decisions, and exploit strategic opportunities.

  • 13.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Ravula, Padmaja
    Nedumaran, Swamikannu
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Perceptions of the impacts of urban sprawl among urban and peri-urban dwellers of Hyderabad, India: a Latent class clustering analysis2022In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 12787-12812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other developing countries, urban sprawl is a growing phenomenon in India, which poses socio-economic and environmental challenges that worryingly affect urban sustainability. In this study, a latent class clustering approach was used to investigate perceptions of urban sprawl among 622 urban and peri-urban dwellers in Hyderabad. The empirical results clustered the respondents into three distinct classes based on their perceptions of urban sprawl impacts: ‘undecided respondents’, ‘negative perceivers’, and ‘opportunity perceivers’. The majority of respondents were undecided with no strong views towards the impacts of urban sprawl, which may increase their vulnerability and hinder effective adaptation to the adverse economic, social and environmental effects of urban sprawl. This also provokes concerns about the effectiveness of government interventions to build public awareness of urban development and its impacts on the city. With regard to the role of demographic and socio-economic characteristics in shaping the perception of the respondents, the results revealed that social caste plays a determining role in forming dwellers’ perception. In particular, members of marginalised social castes were more likely to form positive perceptions of the impacts of urban sprawl as urban expansion generates better and stable income that improve their social status. In addition, individuals with higher levels of education were more likely to form negative or positive perceptions, implying that efforts to raise social capital could be a useful means for mitigating the impacts of urban sprawl. Finally, membership in community development organisations was a key factor in dictating membership of the negative perceivers’ class. Overall, our findings suggest that an appropriate policy framework and specific programmes are needed for enhancing dwellers’ perception towards the impacts of urban sprawl, which can enhance the design, acceptance, and implementation of a more sustainable governance of urbanisation and contribute to achieving urban sustainability in developing countries.

  • 14.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Riaz, Tabeer
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Orkoh, Emmanuel
    The debt trap dilemma of African governments: balancing debt services, food security and development – while avoiding civil unrest2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly half of Africa’s economies are on the brink of debt distress. Unlike previous debt crises, the current one is characterised by a shift from multilateral to commercial and bilateral creditors, notably China, and the proliferation of Eurobonds. Pressured by heavy debt burdens, there is a risk that African governments divert funds from essential sectors such as education, health care and agriculture, causing a vicious cycle of stalled development, food insecurity and an elevated risk of socio-political instability.

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  • 15.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, AlArish, Egypt.
    Surry, Yves
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    An econometric investigation of EU's import demand for fresh potato: a source differentiated analysis focusing on Egypt2022In: Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, ISSN 2044-0839, E-ISSN 2044-0847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – A better understanding of the determinants of demand through accurate estimates of the elasticityof import demand can help policymakers and exporters improve their market access and competitiveness. This study analyzed the EU’s demand for imported potato from major suppliers between 1994 and 2018, with the aim to evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study adopted an import-differentiated framework to investigatedemand relationships among the major potato suppliers to the EU’s. To evaluate the competitiveness of Egyptian potato on the EU market, expenditure and price demand elasticities for various suppliers werecalculated and compared.

    Findings – The empirical results indicated that as income allocation of fresh potatoes increases, theinvestigated EU markets import more potatoes from other suppliers compared to imports from Egypt. The results show that EU importers may switch to potato imports from other suppliers as the import price ofEgyptian potatoes increases, which enter the EU markets before domestically produced potatoes are harvested.

    Research limitations/implications – Due to data unavailability, the present study relied on yearly data onquantities and prices of EU potato imports. A higher frequency of observations should allow for consideringseasonal effects, and thereby providing a more transparent picture of market dynamics and demand behaviorof EU countries with respect to potato import from various sources of origin.

    Originality/value – The study used a system-wide and source differentiated approach to analyze importdemand. In particular, the empirical approach allowed for comparing different demand models (AIDS,Rotterdam, NBR and CBS) to filter out the superior and most suitable model for that data because the suitabilityand performance of a demand model depends rather on data than on universal criteria.

  • 16.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Arish University.
    Tirkaso, Wondmagegn Tafesse
    Tadesse, Elazar
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    An extended integrative model of behavioural prediction for examining households’ food waste behaviour in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia2022In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 179, article id 106073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In developing countries, urbanization and demographic changes are increasing food waste generation at household levels. However, it remains unclear how behavioural and personal characteristics influence the behaviours of urban consumers in developing countries regarding food waste. In this study, we extended the integrative model of behavioural prediction to examine the determinants of food waste behaviour amongst a sample of 698 urban dwellers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The empirical results revealed that attitudes and perceived behavioural control were the most important predictors of intention toward food waste reduction. With regard to food waste behaviours, the results showed that the more an individual feels obliged to discard less food, the higher the odds that the quantity of food that gets wasted by the household would be reduced. Likewise, knowledge about the negative impacts of wasting food and an ability to interpret information on labels of food products were associated with decreased quantities of household food waste. In addition, lower psychological distance to food waste was generally associated with lower quantities of wasted food. Finally, sociodemographic characteristics and food-shopping routines were found to be significant predictors of food waste behaviours. Overall, these findings constitute an entry point for more research and policy measures in order to understand determinants of household food waste behaviours in developing countries and to design effective interventions to reinforce their behaviours towards more sustainable food consumption patterns.

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  • 17.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics & Rural Development, Arish University, Al-Arish, Egypt.
    Zhen, Liu
    School of Business, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
    Assessing stakeholder engagement in public spending, green finance and sustainable economic recovery in the highest emitting economies2022In: Economic Change and Restructuring, ISSN 1573-9414, E-ISSN 1574-0277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The generally held belief is that government spending on education and research and development is to bring about direct impacts on the advancement and sustainability of an economy. Nonetheless, this evidence is not prevalent within industrialized and third-world economies, particularly among the foremost ten carbon dioxide releasing economies. Therefore, the OLS and the DEA are used to estimate the relationship between government public spending on research and development plus green economic advancement, utilizing data from several countries between 2008 and 2018. The findings reveal a varying green economic expansion indicator, which is a result of inadequate government programs to deliver results. Subsequently, for types of expenditure where formal juxtaposition can be made, such as RE compared with conventional energy, the authors detect that multipliers on green cost are almost twofold their traditional sources. The point approximate of the multipliers is 1.1–1.7 for green energy financing and 0.4 and 0.7 for conventional energy financing, depending on time and modeling. These results passed all the required sensitivity analyses. They provided backing to the bottom-up analysis, which reveals that controlling global warming, including preventing biodiversity extinction, works hand in hand with creating economic development and advancement. 

  • 18.
    Bassler,, Arnd
    et al.
    BLE, Germany.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zebeli, Quendrim
    University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
    Deliverable of Work Package 7: Common Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda2022Report (Other academic)
  • 19. Chiwona-Karltun, Linley
    et al.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Wamala-Larsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Salome
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Made, Nolwandle
    Kanuma Taremwa, Nathan
    Melyoki, Lemayon
    Kinunda Rutashobya, Lettice
    Madonsela, Thulisile
    Lourens, Marna
    Stone, Wendy
    Bizoza, Alfred R.
    COVID-19: From health crises to food security anxiety and policy implications2021In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 794-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like the rest of the world, African countries are reeling from the health, economic and social effects of COVID-19. The continent's governments have responded by imposing rigorous lockdowns to limit the spread of the virus. The various lockdown measures are undermining food security, because stay at home orders have among others, threatened food production for a continent that relies heavily on agriculture as the bedrock of the economy. This article draws on quantitative data collected by the GeoPoll, and, from these data, assesses the effect of concern about the local spread and economic impact of COVID-19 on food worries. Qualitative data comprising 12 countries south of the Sahara reveal that lockdowns have created anxiety over food security as a health, economic and human rights/well-being issue. By applying a probit model, we find that concern about the local spread of COVID-19 and economic impact of the virus increases the probability of food worries. Governments have responded with various efforts to support the neediest. By evaluating the various policies rolled out we advocate for a feminist economics approach that necessitates greater use of data analytics to predict the likely impacts of intended regulatory relief responses during the recovery process and post-COVID-19.

  • 20.
    Fang, Wang
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Yang, Zhenyu
    Institute of Agricultural Economics and Information, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, China.
    Liu, Zhen
    School of Business, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Green recovery of cropland carrying capacity in developed regions: empirical evidence from Guangdong, China2023In: Economic Change and Restructuring, ISSN 1573-9414, E-ISSN 1574-0277, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 2405-2436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates the carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province,China, using the entropy weight method. Ecological and environmental pressuresignificantly impacts capacity, while economic and social factors are stable.Production pressure fluctuates and rises. To improve capacity, we must reduce ecologicaland environmental pressure, protect cultivated land resources, develop andpromote green technology, and maintain water conservation facilities. The resultsindicate that reducing ecological and environmental pressure is essential to improvethe carrying capacity of cultivated land in Guangdong Province. In conclusion, thisstudy highlights the importance of balancing economic growth with environmentalsustainability in developing regions like Guangdong Province. It suggests that aholistic approach that considers ecological, economic, and social factors is necessaryto ensure long-term food security and sustainable land use practices.

  • 21.
    Ha, Thanh Mai
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Faculty of Economics and Rural Development, Vietnam National University of Agriculture, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
    Hansson, Helena
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Darr, Dietrich
    Rhine-Waal University of Applied Sciences, Kleve, Germany.
    Shakur, Shamim
    School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.
    A risk-benefit approach to the purchase and consumption of conventional vegetables in wet markets2022In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 176, article id 106142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hatab, Assem Abu
    et al.
    Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Krautscheid, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering LTH, Lund University, Lund, Sweden,.
    Amuakwa-Mensah, Franklin
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts, Humans and Technology. Environment for Development, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Sweden.
    COVID-19 risk perception and public compliance with preventive measures: Evidence from a multi-wave household survey in the MENA region2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 7, article id e0283412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the association between individuals’ concern about contracting COVID-19 and their compliance with recommended preventive and mitigation measures, namely wearing face masks, maintaining social distancing and handwashing, in the context of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The empirical analysis is based on a panel dataset from the Combined COVID-19 MENA Monitor Household Survey, which was carried out in Jordan, Morocco, Sudan, Tunisia and Egypt. Applying a probit estimation technique, a positive and statistically significant association was found between the level of COVID-19 worries and individuals’ compliance with the mitigation measures. Notably, the results revealed that this association followed a “first-up-then-down” trend, showing that compliance with the three mitigation measures rose as individuals’ worries about contracting the virus increased, and then markedly decreased after they had been infected. Sociodemographic characteristics contributing to lower levels of compliance included being male, being over 60, having lower levels of education and having a lower household income. A cross-country analysis revealed remarkable differences between the five countries, with the strongest association between COVID-19 concerns and adherence to mitigation measures observed in Tunisia and Sudan, and the weakest association seen in Jordan and Morocco. Policy implications are outlined for effective risk communication and management during disease outbreaks and public health emergencies to encourage appropriate public health behaviours.

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  • 23.
    Huang, Wei
    et al.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Liu, Qian
    Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Is the technical efficiency green?: The environmental efficiency of agricultural production in the MENA region2023In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 327, article id 116820Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Khan, Imran
    et al.
    Binjing College, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province, China.
    Lei, Hongdou
    College of Economics & Management, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China; The Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
    Shah, Ashfaq Ahmad
    School of Management Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education & Collaborative Innovation Centre on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters (CICFEMD), Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing City, Jiangsu Province, China.
    Khan, Inayat
    School of Management, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, China.
    Baz, Khan
    China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China.
    Koondhar, Mansoor Ahmad
    College of Economics & Management, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China.
    Hatab, Aseem Abu
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Environmental quality and the asymmetrical nonlinear consequences of energy consumption, trade openness and economic development: prospects for environmental management and carbon neutrality2021In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 14654-14664Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Levin, Jörgen
    et al.
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit.
    Karingi, Stephen
    Regional Integration and Trade Division, United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).
    Unlocking Africa's trade potential: promises and pitfalls of the African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Africa’s countries have agreed to form the world's largest free trade area, the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). The purpose is to create a single market by eliminating trade and labour barriers. This is expected to increase trade both within Africa and with other regions. However, past trade reforms have not been very successful. Moreover, the effects of the AfCFTA may vary greatly from country to country due to differences in political will, capacity and economic structure. The key to making it work is to facilitate trade and reduce non-tariff trade barriers, while taking into account the diversified political and economic context.

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  • 26.
    Macura, Biljana
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ran, Ylva
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, U. Martin
    Physical Resource Theory, Department of Space, Earth & Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonell, Malin
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Röös, Elin
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    What evidence exists on the effects of public policy interventions for achieving environmentally sustainable food consumption?: A systematic map protocol2022In: Environmental Evidence, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 11, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The global food system is causing considerable environmental harm. A transition towards more sustainable consumption is needed. Targeted public policy interventions are crucial for stimulating such transition. While there is extensive research about the promotion of more environmentally sustainable food consumption, this knowledge is scattered across different sources. This systematic map aims to collate and describe the available evidence on public policy interventions such as laws, directives, taxes and information campaigns, for achieving sustainable food consumption patterns.

    Methods: We will search bibliographic databases, specialist websites, Google Scholar and bibliographies of relevant reviews. Searches for academic literature will be performed in English, while searches for grey literature will be performed in English, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian. Screening, including consistency checking exercises, will be done at two levels: title and abstract, and full text. We will use machine learning algorithms to support screening at the title and abstract level. Coding and meta-data extraction will include bibliographic information, policy details and context, and measured environmental outcome(s). The evidence base will be summarised narratively using tables and graphs and presented as an online interactive searchable database and a website that will allow for visualisation, filtering and exploring systematic map findings, knowledge gaps and clusters.

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  • 27.
    Padmaja, Ravula
    et al.
    Enabling Systems Transformation, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India.
    Nedumaran, Swamikannu
    Enabling Systems Transformation, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India.
    Jyosthnaa, Padmanabhan
    Enabling Systems Transformation, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India.
    Kavitha, Kasala
    Enabling Systems Transformation, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, Patancheru, India.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Economics and Rural Development, Arish University, Arish, Egypt.
    Lagerkvist, Carl-Johan
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    COVID-19 Impact on Household Food Security in Urban and Peri-Urban Areas of Hyderabad, India2022In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 10, article id 814112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ran, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Van Rysselberge, Pierre
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Macura, Biljana
    tockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, U. Martin
    Physical Resource Theory, Department of Space, Earth and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jonell, Malin
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Röös, Elin
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of public policy interventions for environmentally sustainable food consumption: a systematic map of available evidence2024In: Environmental Evidence, E-ISSN 2047-2382, Vol. 13, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 29.
    Röös, E.
    et al.
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wood, A.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Säll, S.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahlgren, S.
    Department of Agriculture and Food, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Lund & Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallström, E.
    Department of Agriculture and Food, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Lund & Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tidåker, P.
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hansson, H.
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Diagnostic, regenerative or fossil-free - exploring stakeholder perceptions of Swedish food system sustainability2023In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 203, article id 107623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an analysis of food system sustainability challenges and solutions among Swedish food system actors using Q-methodology, five perspectives were identified. One of the main three perspectives placed the highest priority on reduced meat consumption, food waste, and climate impact in agriculture, but downplayed strategies highlighted in the national food strategy and social aspects, and can be interpreted as a diagnostic climate mitigation-oriented perspective that does not reflect current negotiated policy processes or ‘softer’ values of food. In an alternative regenerative perspective, industrialized large-scale farming and lack of internalization of external costs were regarded as the main problems, and diversity, soil health, and organic farming as the main solutions. Proponents of a third perspective regarded phasing out fossil fuels, increased profitability of companies, increased meat production, and self-sufficiency as high priorities. These contrasting views can be a major barrier to transforming the Swedish food system. However, a number of entry points for change (i.e. aspects highly important for some and neutral for others) were identified, including focusing on healthy diets and increased production of fruit and vegetables. Focusing on these can build trust among stakeholders before moving to discussions about the larger and more sensitive systemic changes needed.

  • 30. Sodaitytė, Inga
    et al.
    Šarauskis, Egidijus
    Kriaučiūnienė, Zita
    Kazlauskas, Marius
    Ruiz, Manuel Pérez
    Apolo-Apolo, Enrique
    Pantazi, Xanthoula Eirini
    Díaz, Manuela
    Abu Hatab, Assem
    The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Unit. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Owusu-Sekyere, Enoch
    Carballido, Jacob
    Whetton, Rebecca
    Almoujahed, Mhd Baraa
    Rangarajan, Aravind Krishnaswamy
    Moshou, Dimitrios
    Mouazen, Abdul M.
    Smart Solutions for Selective Harvesting of Cereals Based on Mycotoxin Content2022In: Žmogaus ir gamtos sauga (Human and nature safety), ISSN 1822-1823, p. 13-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a fungal disease that affects a variety of cereals. FHB is most commonly caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. FHB infected crops can develop a wide variety of mycotoxins, which are very dangerous to humans and animals. FHB is currently being controlled by chemical fungicides, which are very dangerous for the environment and are only effective under certain conditions. Resistant varieties and well-chosen agricultural technologies can help reduce the prevalence of FHB in plants. However, at present there are no fully resistant varieties. The article analyses the possible ways to identify FHB infected areas in winter wheat and barley crops and how this data can be used to map field infestation. For the detection of FHB is used field scanning and analysis of the multispectral or hyperspectral data results on field contamination. According exact field locations affected by FHB, harvesting trajectories can be designed to distinguish between completely uninfected, minimally infected, and heavily infected plants. According to this, the harvest can later be sorted into top quality, medium and low quality.

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