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  • 1.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Rosenberg, SusanneRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.Misgeld, OlofRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.Hjalmarsson, JonasRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.Berndalen, PetterRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.Marsden, BridgetRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.Willman, PernillaRoyal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Frisell, Ellika (Creator)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Karlsson, Eva (Cover designer)
    1976-2006, 30 år med Folkmusik på KMH2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 2.
    Falkenberg, Kjetil
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm. KTH.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz. KTH.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production. KTH.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH.
    Mattias, Sköld
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Composition and Conducting. KTH.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions.  We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 3.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Misgeld, Olof
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Mattias, Sköld
    KMH Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Student involvement in sound and music computing research: Current practices at KTH and KMH2019In: Combined proceedings of the Nordic Sound and Music Computing Conference 2019 and the Interactive Sonification Workshop 2019, Stockholm, 2019, p. 36-42Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To engage students in and beyond course activities has been a working practice both at KTH Sound and Music Computing group and at KMH Royal College of Music since many years. This paper collects experiences of involving students in research conducted within the two institutions. 

    We describe how students attending our courses are given the possibility to be involved in our research activities, and we argue that their involvement both contributes to develop new research and benefits the students in the short and long term.  Among the assignments, activities, and tasks we offer in our education programs are pilot experiments, prototype development, public exhibitions, performing, composing, data collection, analysis challenges, and bachelor and master thesis projects that lead to academic publications.

  • 4.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    On Variation and Melodic Improvisation in Swedish Folk Music2013In: (Re)thinking Improvisation: Artistic explorations and conceptual writing / [ed] Frisk, H., & Östersjö, S. (Eds.), Malmö: Malmö Academy of Music, Lund University. , 2013, p. 177-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 5.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Spel i rörelse, rörelse i spel2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En presentation ur Olof Misgeld doktorandprojekt där dansens och spelets gemensamma språk är i fokus. Hur kan traditionella samspelsformer i folkmusik utforskas, utmanas och utvidgas genom ljudande och visuell mediering av dansrörelse.

  • 6.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    The melodic beat - asymmetric variations in polska performances.2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: The melodic beat - asymmetric variations in polska performances 

    Triple-beat forms in Scandinavian Folk Music and Dance traditions sometimes have asymmetrical beat, and this is true for local styles of the Swedish polska. How musical metrical structures are mirrored in Norwegian folk dance forms has been described by Blom (1993) and in Motion Capture studies (Haugen, 2016). In these traditions beat patterns are often varied within performances, shifting between more or less asymmetric measures. Folk music theorists have related these asymmetric beat variations to melodic surface structures (Ahlbäck, 2003).

     

    The aim of this study is a deeper understanding of these musical structures and towards exploring how performers’ expressional variations of asymmetric beat patterns correspond to subtle variations in style-specific dance movements. Can the interaction between musician and dancer be traced through this shaping of beat structures? 

     

    Asymmetric beat patterns are here studied from recordings of different versions of the same musical pieces: polska in a local tradition. The data includes historical archive recordings and recent recordings of fiddlers playing for dancers, recorded with sound and Motion Capture. Recordings were annotated both manually and using an auto-notation algorithm (Ahlbäck, et al 2019). Beat patterns were compared to aspects of melodic phrase structures, such as melodic form and the effect of the frequency of note onsets on the relative length of a beat. 

     

    The results show that asymmetric beat patterns were related to the specific melodic contour and to some extent to the number of onsets within a beat and  to certain melodic rhythms. The results also show that within recurring rhythms in a performance the degree of asymmetry can be varied. The beat patterns were found to be more consistent in different recordings with the same players than when compared between players. 

     

    The findings point towards how and where the beat is placed within a melodic framework can be regarded as an important part of the expression in these music and dance forms. This study marks a first step in exploring how melodic rhythm and metrical beat asymmetry unfold over the course of these performances. Finding and exploring  these patterns will facilitate studies of rhythmical and metrical variation as a means of interaction between dancers and players.

     

    Ahlbäck, S. (2003). About Asymmetrical Beat in the Polska. In M. Ramsten (Ed.), The Polish Dance in Scandinavia and Poland (pp. 165–80). Stockholm: Svenskt visarkiv.

    Ahlbäck, S., Emtell, S., Ronström, E., & et al at DoReMir. (2019). ScoreCloud Studio 4.2. Stockholm: DoReMIR Music research AB.

    Blom, J.-P. (1993). Rytme og frasering-forholdet til dansen. Fanitullen. Innføring i Norsk Og Samisk Folkemusikk, 161–184.

    Haugen, M. R. (2016). Music–Dance Investigating Rhythm Structures in Brazilian Samba and Norwegian Telespringar Performance. Universitetet i Oslo.

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    Poster
  • 7.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    The melodic beat - digging into music-dance relations in Swedish Folk.2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With this presentation my intention is to give some short introductory notes on parts of the world of Swedish folk music and dance where I have been lucky to be involved  - as musician, teacher of folk music and researcher working with folk music and dance. As a folk musician playing the fiddle, I often find myself in collaborations with folk dancers and pedagogues, in pedagogical and artistic contexts, working with amateurs and professionals, performing in stage performance or as a traditional dance musician. I teach Folk Music Theory at the Royal College of Music (KMH) in Stockholm and I am in the early stage of pursuing a PhD in mediated communication at Royal technical Institute KTH in Stockholm focusing on Folk music theory and the interaction between music and dance. First some information on the higher educations in folk music and folk dance and in particular on the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Then some reference to my own dance-music research and finally some notes on folk dance on stage in Sweden.

  • 8.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Exploring beat connections in Swedish Folk music and dance.2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between musicians and dancers is generally described as strong in many traditional musics and this holds also for Scandinavian Folk Music - spelmansmusik. Understanding this interaction has potential for developing theories on performance strategies that can be useful for artistic and pedagogical purposes. This serves the aim of the ongoing doctoral project “Oral Music Theory – music theoretical tools for performance expression within folk music” conducted in collaboration between KMH Royal College of Music and KTH Royal Institute of Technology. Motion capture data of live performances of three fiddlers and two dancers were recorded, as well as dancing of the same dancers to recordings by an influential player. A first paper incorporated measurements and visualizations of performance data, contextualized by interviews with the performers. A second study further investigated the link between dancer and musician by having the same musicians perform to animations generated from the motion capture recordings of the dancers. The different stimuli focused on motions of selected body parts with the aim to understand how different movements can provide reliable cues for musicians. Results illustrate a reliable alignment to renderings showing full skeletons of dancers, and an advantage of focused displays of movements in the upper back of the dancer. Based on these results, we currently explore how asymmetric beat patterns relate to melodic rhythmic surface structures in Swedish local polska traditions. Our paper will summarize our previous results, introduce the collected data, and provide first results from this current work. Examples of results include the relation of onset frequency and rhythmic gestalt to relative beat duration.

  • 9.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Berndalen, Petter
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Öberg, Anna
    Palmgren, Lina
    Search 4 Synergy, FoU-projekt: Searching for synergy by exploring the common ground for musical practise and experience in the meeting between folk music and dance,2012Report (Other academic)
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  • 10.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Interdisciplinary Music Research - a Stockholm example2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborations between universities and institutions are a part of the commitment of higher education. However, finding relevant and practical openings can be challenging.

    A collaboration between KMH Royal College of Music and KTH Royal Institute of Technology Institute in Stockholm has provided for teachers at KMH to participate in Ph.D. training programs within the field of Sound and Music Computing at KTH. Currently, four teachers from Jazz, Folk Music, Composition and Music and Media departments are enrolled at KTH as part of their employment at KMH. This interdisciplinary collaboration aims at enhancing the research environment at KMH and also contribute towards establishing the third-cycle level at KMH, which is currently not available. Another goal is to promote collaborations between students of the two schools, on, for example, master's thesis, course projects, etc.

    The nature of the collaboration between music teachers and researchers within technology and design carries unique possibilities for developing interdisciplinary research that influences teaching practice and the academic environment of the two institutions.

    We present two ongoing doctoral projects within the field of jazz and folk music, their methodologies, and the preliminary outcomes. These projects approach artistic practice with experimental methods and performance analysis using methods from Motion Capture, computational sound analysis, and Music Information Retrieval. The Folk Music project focuses on the interaction between players and dancers aiming towards developing oral music theory. The Jazz project concerns method development for identifying jazz improvisation strategies.

    Download (pdf)
    Presentation
  • 11.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Towards a cross-genre understanding of the beat.2021In: Proceedings: ICCIPEM 2021, Perspectives in Psychology of Music and Music Education, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:In a recent experiment on enculturation and metrical perception, we compared responses of two groups of either folk or jazz musicians tapping the beat to music recordings of familiar and unfamiliar genres: jazz music and Scandinavian folk music. Responses were recorded in audio format, which facilitates analyses of stress patterns and using the responses as input for educational methods as we propose in this abstract. The musicians were all students at the same higher music institution. The study aimed to investigate how enculturation affected beat perception of subjects in a similar cultural background but with specializations in either one of the two genres. Computational metrics for the evaluation of beat tracking algorithms [1] and accent histograms were used in order to analyze differences in how the two groups tapped to the beat for each genre. The results showed differences in the group’s synchronization when tapping to the familiar and unfamiliar examples, as well as differences between the groups concerning the preferred metrical level, the accentuation of beat cycles and in response to the asymmetric beat cycles featured in the Scandinavian, triple meter tune types [2]. Understanding how the perception of rhythm can vary between groups of musicians [3] may enhance the capability to communicate and interact across genres, and as such these results are relevant for music education. In order to facilitate such cross-genre understanding, we outline a teaching methodology that uses tapping recordings in the context of a workshop, including one or several of these student groups.Drawing on our experiment, this workshop will focus on music examples where the groups tapping patterns differed significantly. Specifically, these examples include extremely slow or fast tempi in jazz, and folk tunes with asymmetric beat. Furthermore, they illustrate genre-specific approaches: solo playing or ensemble playing with leading and accompanying parts.In the proposed workshop setting, students will be instructed to tap the beat to music examples containing unfamiliar metrical structures. Additionally, students will be asked to play simple accompaniment parts along with the examples, and to play typical musical excerpts while applying alternative metrical interpretations. Subsequently, they will be asked to tap or play with the same recordings, but with added sounds of tapping responses obtained from groups of expert musicians.The sound of the tapping recordings is suited to be distinguished from the original recordings: for Scandinavian folk music performed on solo violin, the tapping will stand out in the lower register, similar to foot-tapping; for jazz ensemble, the tapping sounds will be filtered to resemble medium bright wood-sticks. Thus, this methodology, accompanied by discussions involving students and teachers, facilitates students gaining insights into how expert musicians respond to metrical structures in a non-familiar genre, and aims towards a practice-based understanding of playing with the beat in different musical contexts.The workshops will be recorded for later evaluation and students will be asked to comment on their responses during the different stages of the workshop. We aim to report first results from the application of the tapping responses in teaching contexts in our presentation.

    Bibliographic References:

    [1] Davies, M. E., Degara, N., & Plumbley, M. D. (2009). Evaluation methods for musical audio beat tracking algorithms. Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Digital Music, Tech. Rep. C4DM-TR-09-06.

    [2] Ahlbäck, S. (2003). About asymmetrical beat in the polska. The Polish dance in Scandinavia and Poland, 17, 165-180.

    [3] Polak, R., Jacoby, N., Fischinger, T., Goldberg, D., Holzapfel, A., & London, J. (2018). Rhythmic Prototypes Across Cultures. Music Perception, 36(1), 1–23.

  • 12.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Miniotaitė, Jūra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A case study of deep enculturation and sensorimotor synchronization to real music2021In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Music Information Retrieval, ISMIR 2021, International Society for Music Information Retrieval, 2021, p. 460-467Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchronization of movement to music is a behavioural capacity that separates humans from most other species. Whereas such movements have been studied using a wide range of methods, only few studies have investigated synchronisation to real music stimuli in a cross-culturally comparative setting. The present study employs beat tracking evaluation metrics and accent histograms to analyze the differences in the ways participants from two cultural groups synchronize their tapping with either familiar or unfamiliar music stimuli. Instead of choosing two apparently remote cultural groups, we selected two groups of musicians that share cultural backgrounds, but that differ regarding the music style they specialize in. The employed method to record tapping responses in audio format facilitates a fine-grained analysis of metrical accents that emerge from the responses. The identified differences between groups are related to the metrical structures inherent to the two musical styles, such as non-isochronicity of the beat, and differences between the groups document the influence of the deep enculturation of participants to their style of expertise. Besides these findings, our study sheds light on a conceptual weakness of a common beat tracking evaluation metric, when applied to human tapping instead of machine generated beat estimations.

  • 13.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Gulz, Torbjörn
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Jazz.
    Miniotaitė, Jūra
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    A CASE STUDY OF DEEP ENCULTURATION AND SENSORIMOTOR SYNCHRONIZATION TO REAL MUSIC2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchronization of movement to music is a behavioural capacity that separates humans from most other species. Whereas such movements have been studied using a wide range of methods, only few studies have investigated synchronisation to real music stimuli in a cross-culturally comparative setting. The present study employs beat tracking evaluation metrics and accent histograms to analyze the differences in the ways participants from two cultural groups synchronize their tapping with either familiar or unfamiliar music stimuli. Instead of choosing two apparently remote cultural groups, we selected two groups of musicians that share cultural backgrounds, but that differ regarding the music style they specialize in. The employed method to record tapping responses in audio format facilitates a fine-grained analysis of metrical accents that emerge from the responses. The identified differences between groups are related to the metrical structures inherent to the two musical styles, such as non-isochronicity of the beat, and differences between the groups document the influence of the deep enculturation of participants to their style of expertise. Besides these findings, our study sheds light on a conceptual weakness of a common beat tracking evaluation metric, when applied to human tapping instead of machine generated beat estimations.

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    fulltext
  • 14.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Towards the study of embodied meter in Swedish folk dance2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interrelation of playing and dancing is central for understanding performance practice in Swedish folk music, as it plays an important role for the metric and rhythmic qualities of spelmansmusik, and playing for dancing is considered a key competence for musicians in this tradition. As part of a research project into performance practice, sound, video and motion capture (MoCap) data were recorded from live performances of three musicians and two dancers in different combinations. In addition, dancing to two recordings by an influential musician and to live and pre-recorded beat clapping was recorded. This paper incorporates measurements and visualizations of performance data in combination with performer participation and interviews. As a starting point for our project, we focus on metric qualities in a historical recording, and on the dance movement patterns to a Swedish polska style with asymmetrical beat patterns. For this paper - as a preliminary investigation into the material - the recordings of one dancer dancing to an isochronous clapped beat, and to a recording by an influential player have been used for comparison of a central movement pattern in dancing. The findings show that asymmetric beat patterns contained in the recording cause wider variation among the movement patterns when compared to the patterns observed to isochronous clapping. Considering the performers reactions towards using MoCap as a tool for viewing and discussing their performances, we propose further investigations by combining scientific, ethnomusicological and artistic research methods into the research of performance practice in folk music.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Dancing Dots - Investigating the Link between Dancer and Musician in Swedish Folk Dance2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between musicians and dancers is generally described as strong in many traditional musics and this holds also for Scandinavian Folk Music - spelmansmusik. Understanding the interaction of music and dance has potential for developing theories of performance strategies in artistic practice and for developing interactive systems. In this paper we investigate this link by having Swedish folk musicians perform to animations generated from motion capture recordings of dancers. The different stimuli focus on motions of selected body parts as moving white dots on a computer screen with the aim to understand how different movements can provide reliable cues for musicians. Sound recordings of fiddlers playing to the "dancing dot" were analyzed using automatic alignment to the original music performance related to the dance recordings. Interviews were conducted with musicians and comments were collected in order to shed light on strategies when playing for dancing. Results illustrate a reliable alignment to renderings showing full skeletons of dancers, and an advantage of focused displays of movements in the upper back of the dancer.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden;;KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    The melodic beat: exploring asymmetry in polska performance2021In: Journal of Mathematics and Music - Mathematical and Computational Approaches to Music Theory, Analysis, Composition and Performance, ISSN 1745-9737, E-ISSN 1745-9745, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some triple-beat forms in Scandinavian Folk Music are characterized by non-isochronous beat durations: asymmetric beats. Theorists of folk music have suggested that the variability of rhythmic figures and asymmetric metre are fundamental to these forms. The aim of this study is to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between melodic structure and asymmetric metre by analysing semi-automatically annotated performances. Our study considers archive and contemporary recordings of fiddlers' different versions of the same musical pieces: polska tunes in a local Swedish tradition. Results show that asym-metric beat patterns are consistent between performances and that they correspond with structural features of rhythmic figures, such as the note density within beats. The present study goes beyond previous work by exploring the use of a state-of-the-art automatic music notation tool in a corpus study of Swedish traditional music, and by employing statistical methods for a comparative analysis of performances across different players.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Department of Folk Music, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden;.
    The melodic beat: exploring asymmetry in polska performance2021In: Journal of Mathematics and Music - Mathematical and Computational Approaches to Music Theory, Analysis, Composition and Performance, ISSN 1745-9737, E-ISSN 1745-9745, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some triple-beat forms in Scandinavian Folk Music are characterized by non-isochronous beat durations: asymmetric beats. Theorists of folk music have suggested that the variability of rhythmic figures and asymmetric metre are fundamental to these forms. The aim of this study is to obtain a deeper understanding of the relationship between melodic structure and asymmetric metre by analysing semi-automatically annotated performances. Our study considers archive and contemporary recordings of fiddlers' different versions of the same musical pieces: polska tunes in a local Swedish tradition. Results show that asymmetric beat patterns are consistent between performances and that they correspond with structural features of rhythmic figures, such as the note density within beats. The present study goes beyond previous work by exploring the use of a state-of-the-art automatic music notation tool in a corpus study of Swedish traditional music, and by employing statistical methods for a comparative analysis of performances across different players. 

  • 18.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Royal College of Music (KMH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Towards the study of embodied meter in Swedish folk dance2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interrelation of playing and dancing is central for understanding performance practice in Swedish folk music, as it plays an important role for the metric and rhythmic qualities of spelmansmusik, and playing for dancing is considered a key competence for musicians in this tradition. As part of a research project into performance practice, sound, video and motion capture (MoCap) data were recorded from live performances of three musicians and two dancers in different combinations. In addition, dancing to two recordings by an influential musician and to live and pre-recorded beat clapping was recorded. This paper incorporates measurements and visualizations of performance data in combination with performer participation and interviews. As a starting point for our project, we focus on metric qualities in a historical recording, and on the dance movement patterns to a Swedish polska style with asymmetrical beat patterns. For this paper - as a preliminary investigation into the material - the recordings of one dancer dancing to an isochronous clapped beat, and to a recording by an influential player have been used for comparison of a central movement pattern in dancing. The findings show that asymmetric beat patterns contained in the recording cause wider variation among the movement patterns when compared to the patterns observed to isochronous clapping. Considering the performers reactions towards using MoCap as a tool for viewing and discussing their performances, we propose further investigations by combining scientific, ethnomusicological and artistic research methods into the research of performance practice in folk music.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Dancing Dots - Investigating the Link between Dancer and Musician in Swedish Folk Dance2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between musicians and dancers is generally described as strong in many traditional musics and this holds also for Scandinavian Folk Music - spelmansmusik. Understanding the interaction of music and dance has potential for developing theories of performance strategies in artistic practice and for developing interactive systems. In this paper we investigate this link by having Swedish folk musicians perform to animations generated from motion capture recordings of dancers. The different stimuli focus on motions of selected body parts as moving white dots on a computer screen with the aim to understand how different movements can provide reliable cues for musicians. Sound recordings of fiddlers playing to the "dancing dot" were analyzed using automatic alignment to the original music performance related to the dance recordings. Interviews were conducted with musicians and comments were collected in order to shed light on strategies when playing for dancing. Results illustrate a reliable alignment to renderings showing full skeletons of dancers, and an advantage of focused displays of movements in the upper back of the dancer.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, André
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Exploring beat connections in Swedish Folk music and dance2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Exploring sonification as a tool for folk music-dance interactions.2022In: Proceedings of the Second Symposium of the ICTM Study Group on Sound, Movement, and the Sciences (SoMoS), 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present ongoing work on the sonification of movements by dancers and players in Swedish folk music, with the aim to develop oral music theory tools for artistic and pedagogical purposes.

    An advantage of using sonification in the exploration of dance and music interaction is that it places dance movements within the same sensory domain as music - sound. In general, human beings are more accurate in perceiving time differences with auditory than visual stimuli, and the ability to listen to the dance movements can facilitate a more precise understanding of the complex temporal relations between movements and music. Sonifying dance movements extend traditional music and dance practices into an artificially created sonic world. With sounding dance movements, the roles in the interaction of dancers and musicians become entangled, which can allow new ways of artistic expression.

    This work aims at sonifying movement patterns in the dance in ways that 1) correspond to the embodied experience of the performers, 2) make the experience of how rhythms and meter interact in dancing and playing more tangible and, 3) allow for artistic explorations of performing with sonifications of dance.

    As a first step we explore sonifying motion capture data of dancers and musicians performing together and sonify movements that are relevant to the rhythmic and metrical patterns of the music and dance forms. This initial focus on recorded data facilitates a sound design that involves first-person perspectives. To this end, we invite expert dancers and musicians to contribute to the design process. We sonify using WebaudioXML to facilitate accessible interactions in this process, through a web interface, and we will present the insights from our ongoing design process. In future extensions we aim to explore using real-time sensors to allow live interactions between sonified dancers and musicians.

  • 22.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Music and Media Production.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, Skolan för elektroteknik och datavetenskap (EECS), Människocentrerad teknologi, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID. (Sound and Music Computing).
    Accessible sonification of movement: A case in Swedish folk dance2023In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference 2023 / [ed] Roberto Bresin, Kjetil Falkenberg and Henrik Frisk, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a sonification tool – SonifyFOLK – designed for intuitive access by musicians and dancers in their sonic explorations of movements in dance performances. It is implemented as a web-based application to facilitate accessible audio parameter mapping of movement data for non-experts, and applied and evaluated with Swedish folk musicians and dancers in their exploration of sonifying dance. SonifyFOLK is based on the WebAudioXML Sonification Toolkit and is designed within a group of artists and engineers using artistic goals as drivers for the sound design. The design addresses challenges of providing an accessible interface for mapping movement data to audio parameters, managing multi-dimensional data and creating audio mapping templates for a contextually grounded sound design. The evaluation documents a diversity of sonification outcomes, reflections by participants that imply curiosity for further work on sonification, as well as the importance of the immediacy of the both visual and acoustic feedback of parameter choices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Misgeld, Olof
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holzapfel, Andre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Accessible sonification of movement: A case in Swedish folk dance2023In: Proceedings of SMC 2023 - Sound and Music Computing Conference, Sound and Music Computing Network , 2023, p. 201-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a sonification tool – SonifyFOLK –designed for intuitive access by musicians and dancers in their sonic explorations of movements in dance performances. It is implemented as a web-based application to facilitate accessible audio parameter mapping of movement data for non-experts, and applied and evaluated with Swedish folk musicians and dancers in their exploration of sonifying dance. SonifyFOLK is based on the WebAudioXML Sonification Toolkit and is designed within a group of artists and engineers using artistic goals as drivers for the sound design. The design addresses challenges of providing an accessible interface for mapping movement data to audio parameters, managing multi-dimensional data and creating audio mapping templates for a contextually grounded sound design. The evaluation documents a diversity of sonification outcomes, reflections by participants that imply curiosity for further work on sonification, as well as the importance of the immediacy of the both visual and acoustic feedback of parameter choices. 

  • 24.
    Rosenberg, Susanne
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Folkmusik – vadårå? Nyfiken på Kungl. Musikaliska Akademiens folkmusikledamöter Om ”att befinna sig mitt i vattnet”2021Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Möt musikern, pedagogen, forskaren och akademiledamoten Susanne Rosenberg i ett samtal om konstnärlig forskning med spelmannen och forskaren Olof Misgeld. Skiljer sig relationen till musiken beroende på vilken hatt man har på sig? Uppstår krockar när man växlar mellan att utöva musiken och att forska på sitt sig själv och sitt utövande? Välkommen till ett samtal mellan två folkmusiker som båda befinner sig mitt i det de forskar på.

  • 25.
    Öberg, Anna
    et al.
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Misgeld, Olof
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    To pass on as an artistic method2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To pass on as an artistic method is an ongoing research where Öberg explore passing on (Sw: tradera) as a concept and artistic practice, transfered from being an implicit pedagogical tool in the cosmology of folk traditions into a choreographic strategy for materials and composition in the contemporary choreography context. During this presentation Öberg and Misgeld will share some aspects of this ongoing research by using their artistic works: Solitude (Öberg, 2019), Living documents (Öberg, 2017) and Dancing Dots (Misgeld, 2022) as a backdrop.

  • 26.
    Misgeld, Olof (Musician, Creator, Composer)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Dregelid, Ami (Dancer)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Berchtold, Andreas (Dancer)
    Stockholms konstnärliga högskola, Institutionen för danspedagogik..
    Prett, Hadrian (Sound designer, Lightning designer, Arranger)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Dancing Dots - the exhibition2022Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance Dancing Dots - the exhibition (Misgeld, 2022) aims to explore new artistic expression in Swedish folk music by combining live performing (playing and dancing) with auditory and visual displays of motion capture recorded movement. The performance was constructed using optical motion capture recordings (MoCap) captured in a collaborative process with one musician and two dancers. This collaborative process included rehearsals, recordings, and evaluations of performances with optical Mocap as a tool for exploring the interactions between sound and movements in our joint performance.  Movements recorded from selected markers on the dancers and the players bodies were used to generate synchronized light and sound loops: marker movements were displayed as moving lights in pixeled tubes, and the sound design was created by mapping synthesized sounds to parameters of movements in selected body parts.  The research question for the performance was to enquire into the artistic and expressive possibilities of combining sonified and visualized movements with live folk music and dance. The motivation for this was three-fold: to explore new ways of artistic expressions by expanding and amplifying the movements into an auditory space in order to allow sonic interactions with traditional dance and fiddle playing; to challenge the dancers and players traditional roles by adding the possibility of interacting (playing/dancing with) with pre-recorded movements; and to bridge across performance contexts by offering possibility for audience to participate by exploring the augmented music/dance by watching, listening and also moving/dancing in the visual/sonic space.  Thus, the overarching aim is to explore methods for an open-ended development of artistic expression with traditional practice both as a departure point and a primary source of inspiration.

  • 27.
    Misgeld, Olof (Musician, Creator)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Ahlbäck, Sven (Musician, Creator)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Berndalen, Petter (Creator, Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Fri Form Folk: Sven Ahlbäck, Petter Berndalen och Olof Misgeld spelar låtar efter Gustaf Jernberg2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Download (jpg)
    Skivomslag
  • 28.
    Misgeld, Olof (Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Berndalen, Petter (Musician)
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music.
    Öberg, Anna (Choreographer, Dancer)
    Fröjd, Viktor (Dancer)
    Langødegård, Anita (Dancer)
    Johansson, Lotta (Dancer)
    Persson, Bert (Dancer)
    Andersson, Anton (Lightning designer)
    Arvefjord, Elize (Sound designer, Arranger)
    Krantz, Sigge (Sound designer)
    Bäcker, Mats (Photographer)
    Figueroa, José (Photographer)
    SOLITUDE2019Artistic output (Refereed)
1 - 28 of 28
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