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  • 1.
    Höffler, Tim N.
    et al.
    IPN - Leibniz‐Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Koć-Januchta, Marta
    IPN - Leibniz‐Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Leutner, Detlev
    University of Duisburg‐Essen, Essen, Germany.
    More Evidence for Three Types of Cognitive Style: Validating the Object-Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire Using Eye Tracking when Learning with Texts and Pictures2017In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 109-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is some indication that people differ regarding their visual and verbal cognitive style. The Object‐Spatial Imagery and Verbal Questionnaire (OSIVQ) assumes a three‐dimensional cognitive style model, which distinguishes between object imagery, spatial imagery and verbal dimensions. Using eye tracking as a means to observe actual gaze behaviours when learning with text–picture combinations, the current study aims to validate this three‐dimensional assumption by linking the OSIVQ to learning behaviour. The results largely confirm the model in that they show the expected correlations between results on the OSIVQ, visuo‐spatial ability and learning behaviour. Distinct differences between object visualizers, spatial visualizers and verbalizers could be demonstrated.

  • 2.
    Koc-Januchta, Marta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. IPN–Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Höffler, Tim N.
    IPN–Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Eckhardt, Marc
    IPN–Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Leutner, Detlev
    Faculty of Education Sciences, Department of Instructional Psychology, University of Duisburg‐Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Does modality play a role? Visual-verbal cognitive style and multimedia learning2019In: Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, ISSN 0266-4909, E-ISSN 1365-2729, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presented in this paper aimed to examine the effect of visual and verbal cognitive style on learning from different types of visualization and modalities of explanatory text. Learning materials in the form of either computer-based animation or a series of static pictures with written or spoken explanations were presented to 197 students. We found that a more developed visual cognitive style was related to a better learning outcome, when learning from a combination of static pictures and written text. Higher developed visualizers achieved poorer learning outcomes when learning with an animation and written text. The results are partially in line with an ability-as-compensator effect and the expertise reversal effect. Additionally, we found a modality effect as the versions with spoken text provided better results on learning outcome than the versions with written text regardless of the prominence of visual cognitive style. No significant interaction effects were found regarding verbal cognitive style.

  • 3.
    Koc-Januchta, Marta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. IPN – Leibniz-Institute for Science and Mathematics Education at Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Höffler, Tim N.
    Leibniz-Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) at the University of Kiel, Germany.
    Thoma, Gun-Brit
    Leibniz-Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN) at the University of Kiel, Germany.
    Prechtl, Helmut
    University of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Didactic of Biology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
    Leutner, Detlev
    Duisburg-Essen University, Faculty of Education Sciences, Instructional Psychology, Essen, Germany.
    Visualizers versus verbalizers: Effects of cognitive style on learning with texts and pictures - An eye-tracking study2017In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 68, p. 170-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted in order to examine the differences between visualizers and verbalizers in the way they gaze at pictures and texts while learning. Using a collection of questionnaires, college students were classified according to their visual or verbal cognitive style and were asked to learn about two different, in terms of subject and type of knowledge, topics by means of text-picture combinations. Eye-tracking was used to investigate their gaze behavior. The results show that visualizers spent significantly more time inspecting pictures than verbalizers, while verbalizers spent more time inspecting texts. Results also suggest that both visualizers' and verbalizers' way of learning is active but mostly within areas providing the source of information in line with their cognitive style (pictures or text). Verbalizers tended to enter non-informative, irrelevant areas of pictures sooner than visualizers. The comparison of learning outcomes showed that the group of visualizers achieved better results than the group of verbalizers on a comprehension test.

  • 4.
    Koc-Januchta, Marta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Schönborn, Konrad
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Tibell, Lena A. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology.
    Chaudhri, Vinay K.
    Stanford University, USA.
    Heller, H. Craig
    Stanford University, USA.
    Asking questions to engage with biology: Investigating students’ interaction and learning with an AI-based textbook2019Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 4 of 4
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