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  • 1.
    Tükenmez, Hasan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Edström, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Kalsum, Sadaf
    Braian, Clara
    Ummanni, Ramesh
    Lindberg, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden (CBCS).
    Sundin, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lerm, Maria
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, Christer
    Corticosteroids protect infected cells against mycobacterial killing in vitro2019In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 511, no 1, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of corticosteroids on human physiology is complex and their use in tuberculosis patients remains controversial. In a high-throughput screening approach designed to discover virulence inhibitors, several corticosteroids were found to prevent cytolysis of fibroblasts infected with mycobacteria. Further experiments with Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed anti-cytolytic activity in the 10 nM range, but no effect on bacterial growth or survival in the absence of host cells at 20 mu M. The results from a panel of corticosteroids with various affinities to the glucocorticoid- and mineralocorticoid receptors indicate that the inhibition of cytolysis most likely is mediated through the glucocorticoid receptor. Using live-imaging of M. tuberculosis-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages, we also show that corticosteroids to some extent control intracellular bacteria. In vitro systems with reduced complexity are to further study and understand the interactions between bacterial infection, immune defense and cell signaling. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 2. Tükenmez, Hasan
    et al.
    Edström, Isabel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Ummanni, Ramesh
    Fick, Stina Berglund
    Sundin, Charlotta
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Larsson, Christer
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence inhibitors discovered by Mycobacterium marinum high-throughput screening2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-throughput screening facilities do not generally support biosafety level 3 organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To discover not only antibacterials, but also virulence inhibitors with either bacterial or host cell targets, an assay monitoring lung fibroblast survival upon infection was developed and optimized for 384-plate format and robotic liquid handling. By using Mycobacterium marinum as surrogate organism, 28,000 compounds were screened at biosafety level 2 classification, resulting in 49 primary hits. Exclusion of substances with unfavourable properties and known antimicrobials resulted in 11 validated hits of which 7 had virulence inhibiting properties and one had bactericidal effect also in wild type Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This strategy to discover virulence inhibitors using a model organism in high-throughput screening can be a valuable tool for other researchers working on drug discovery against tuberculosis and other biosafety level 3 infectious agents.

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