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  • 1.
    Berkström, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Inst Coastal Res, Oregrund, Sweden.
    Papadopoulos, Myron
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jiddawi, Narriman Saleh
    State Univ Zanzibar, Trop Ctr Oceanog Environm Sci & Nat Resources, Zanzibar, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Fishers' Local Ecological Knowledge (LEK) on Connectivity and Seascape Management2019In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In developing countries where data and resources are lacking, the practical relevance of local ecological knowledge (LEK) to expand our understanding of the environment, has been highlighted. The potential roles of the LEK varies from direct applications such as gathering environmental information to a more participative involvement of the community in the management of resources they depend on. Fishers' LEK could therefore be useful in order to obtain information on how to advance management of coastal fisheries. Many targeted fish species migrate between habitats to feed, spawn or recruit, connecting important habitats within the seascape. LEK could help provide answers to questions related to this connectivity and the identification of fish habitat use, and migrations for species and areas where such knowledge is scarce. Here we assess fishers' LEK on connectivity between multiple habitats within a tropical seascape, investigate the differences in LEK among fisher groups and the coherence between LEK and conventional scientific knowledge (CSK). The study was conducted in 2017 in Zanzibar, Tanzania, a tropical developing country. One hundred and thirty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted in six different locations focusing on fish migrations, and matching photos of fish and habitats. Differences between fisher groups were found, where fishers traveling further, exposed to multiple habitats, and who fish with multiple gears had a greater knowledge of connectivity patterns within the seascape than those that fish locally, in single habitats and with just one type of gear. A high degree of overlap in LEK and CSK was found, highlighting the potential benefits of a collaboration between scientists and fishers, and the use of LEK as complementary information in the management of small-scale fisheries.

  • 2.
    Duffy, J. Emmett
    et al.
    Smithsonian Inst, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA.
    Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro
    Univ Pisa, Dept Biol, Pisa, Italy;CoNISMa, Pisa, Italy.
    Trinanes, Joaquin
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Inst Invest Tecnolox, Santiago, Spain;NOAA, Phys Oceanog Div, Atlantic Oceanog & Meteorol Lab, Miami, FL USA;Univ Miami, Rosenstiel Sch Marine & Atmospher Sci, Cooperat Inst Marine & Atmospher Studies, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 USA.
    Muller-Karger, Frank E.
    Univ S Florida, Coll Marine Sci, St Petersburg, FL USA.
    Ambo-Rappe, Rohani
    Hasanuddin Univ, Dept Marine Sci, Makassar, Indonesia.
    Boström, Christoffer
    Abo Akad Univ, Fac Sci & Engn, Environm & Marine Biol, Turku, Finland.
    Buschmann, Alejandro H.
    Univ Los Lagos, Ctr I Mar, Puerto Montt, Chile;Univ Los Lagos, Ctr Biotecnol & Bioingn CeBiB, Puerto Montt, Chile.
    Byrnes, Jarrett
    Univ Massachusetts, Dept Biol, Boston, MA 02125 USA.
    Coles, Robert G.
    James Cook Univ, Ctr Trop Water & Aquat Ecosyst Res, Douglas, Qld, Australia.
    Creed, Joel
    Univ Estado Rio de Janeiro, Dept Ecol, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.
    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C.
    Cardiff Univ, Sustainable Pl Res Inst, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales.
    Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo
    Griffith Univ, Sch Environm & Sci, Brisbane, Qld, Australia;Griffith Univ, Australian Rivers Inst Coast & Estuaries, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Duarte, Carlos M.
    King Abdullah Univ Sci & Technol, Red Sea Res Ctr, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
    Edgar, Graham J.
    Univ Tasmania, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Fortes, Miguel
    Univ Philippines, Marine Sci Inst CS, Quezon City, Philippines.
    Goni, Gustavo
    NOAA, Atlantic Oceanog & Meteorol Lab, Miami, FL 33149 USA.
    Hu, Chuanmin
    Univ S Florida, Coll Marine Sci, St Petersburg, FL USA.
    Huang, Xiaoping
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Sea Inst Oceanol, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China.
    Hurd, Catriona L.
    Univ Tasmania, Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Johnson, Craig
    Univ Tasmania, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Konar, Brenda
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Coll Fisheries & Ocean Sci, Fairbanks, AK USA.
    Krause-Jensen, Dorte
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Biosci, Silkeborg, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Arctic Res Ctr, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Krumhansl, Kira
    Bedford Inst Oceanog, Dartmouth, NS, Canada.
    Macreadie, Peter
    Deakin Univ, Ctr Integrat Ecol, Burwood, Vic, Australia.
    Marsh, Helene
    James Cook Univ, Div Trop Environm & Soc, Townsville, Qld, Australia.
    McKenzie, Len J.
    James Cook Univ, Ctr Trop Water & Aquat Ecosyst Res, Douglas, Qld, Australia.
    Mieszkowska, Nova
    Marine Biol Assoc UK, Plymouth, Devon, England.
    Miloslavich, Patricia
    Univ Tasmania, Inst Marine & Antarctic Studies, Hobart, Tas, Australia;Univ Simon Bolivar, Dept Estudios Ambientales, Caracas, Venezuela.
    Montes, Enrique
    Univ S Florida, Coll Marine Sci, St Petersburg, FL USA.
    Nakaoka, Masahiro
    Hokkaido Univ, Akkeshi Marine Stn, Field Sci Ctr Northern Biosphere, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.
    Norderhaug, Kjell Magnus
    IMR, Bergen, Norway.
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Orth, Robert J.
    Virginia Inst Marine Sci, Coll William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 USA.
    Prathep, Anchana
    Pince Songkla Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Biol, Hat Yai, Thailand.
    Putman, Nathan F.
    LGL Ecol Res Associates, Bryan, TX USA.
    Samper-Villarreal, Jimena
    Univ Costa Rica, Ctr Invest Ciencias Mar & Limnol, San Jose, CA USA.
    Serrao, Ester A.
    Univ Algarve, Ctr Marine Sci CCMAR, Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIMAR, Faro, Portugal.
    Short, Frederick
    Univ New Hampshire, Nat Resources & Environm, Durham, NH 03824 USA.
    Pinto, Isabel Sousa
    Univ Porto, Fac Sci, Interdisciplinary Ctr Marine & Environm Res CIIMA, Porto, Portugal.
    Steinberg, Peter
    Sydney Inst Marine Sci, Mosman, NSW, Australia.
    Stuart-Smith, Rick
    Univ Tasmania, Hobart, Tas, Australia.
    Unsworth, Richard K. F.
    Swansea Univ, Seagrass Ecosyst Res Grp, Swansea, W Glam, Wales.
    van Keulen, Mike
    Murdoch Univ, Ctr Sustainable Aquat Ecosyst Environm & Conserva, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
    van Tussenbroek, Brigitta, I
    Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, ICML, Puerto Morelos, Mexico.
    Wang, Mengqiu
    Univ S Florida, Coll Marine Sci, St Petersburg, FL USA.
    Waycott, Michelle
    Univ Adelaide, Dept Environm & Water, Adelaide, SA, Australia;State Herbarium South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Weatherdon, Lauren, V
    UN Environm World Conservat Monitoring Ctr, Cambridge, England.
    Wernberg, Thomas
    Univ Western Australia, Oceans Inst, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Western Australia, Sch Biol Sci, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Yaakub, Siti Maryam
    DHI Water & Environm, Ecol Habitats & Proc Dept, Singapore, Singapore.
    Toward a Coordinated Global Observing System for Seagrasses and Marine Macroalgae2019In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 317Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In coastal waters around the world, the dominant primary producers are benthic macrophytes, including seagrasses and macroalgae, that provide habitat structure and food for diverse and abundant biological communities and drive ecosystem processes. Seagrass meadows and macroalgal forests play key roles for coastal societies, contributing to fishery yields, storm protection, biogeochemical cycling and storage, and important cultural values. These socio-economically valuable services are threatened worldwide by human activities, with substantial areas of seagrass and macroalgal forests lost over the last half-century. Tracking the status and trends in marine macrophyte cover and quality is an emerging priority for ocean and coastal management, but doing so has been challenged by limited coordination across the numerous efforts to monitor macrophytes, which vary widely in goals, methodologies, scales, capacity, governance approaches, and data availability. Here, we present a consensus assessment and recommendations on the current state of and opportunities for advancing global marine macrophyte observations, integrating contributions from a community of researchers with broad geographic and disciplinary expertise. With the increasing scale of human impacts, the time is ripe to harmonize marine macrophyte observations by building on existing networks and identifying a core set of common metrics and approaches in sampling design, field measurements, governance, capacity building, and data management. We recommend a tiered observation system, with improvement of remote sensing and remote underwater imaging to expand capacity to capture broad-scale extent at intervals of several years, coordinated with strati fied in situ sampling annually to characterize the key variables of cover and taxonomic or functional group composition, and to provide ground-truth. A robust networked system of macrophyte observations will be facilitated by establishing best practices, including standard protocols, documentation, and sharing of resources at all stages of work flow, and secure archiving of open-access data. Because such a network is necessarily distributed, sustaining it depends on close engagement of local stakeholders and focusing on building and long-term maintenance of local capacity, particularly in the developing world. Realizing these recommendations will producemore effective, efficient, and responsive observing, a more accurate global picture of change in vegetated coastal systems, and stronger international capacity for sustaining observations.

  • 3.
    Mtwana Nordlund, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Åbo Akademi University, Finland; WIO CARE, Tanzania.
    de la Torre-Castro, Maricela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Conand, Chantal
    Muthiga, Nyawira
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Intertidal Zone Management in the Western Indian Ocean: Assessing Current Status and Future Possibilities Using Expert Opinions2014In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1006-1019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This expert opinion study examined the current status of the intertidal zone in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) and ranked and discussed future management approaches. Information was gathered from scientists, practitioners, and managers active in the WIO region through a questionnaire and a workshop. The experts stated that the productive intertidal environment is highly valuable for reasons such as recreation, erosion protection, and provision of edible invertebrates and fish. Several anthropogenic pressures were identified, including pollution, harbor activities, overexploitation, and climate change. The experts considered the WIO intertidal zone as generally understudied, undermanaged, and with poor or no monitoring. The most important management strategies according to the expert opinions are to develop and involve local people in integrated coastal zone management (ICZM), to increase knowledge on species-environment relationships, and to develop awareness campaigns and education programs. To improve coastal environmental management and conservation, we argue that the intertidal zone should be treated as one organizational management unit within the larger framework of ICZM.

  • 4. Unsworth, Richard K. F.
    et al.
    McKenzie, Len J.
    Collier, Catherine J.
    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C.
    Duarte, Carlos M.
    Eklöf, Johan S.
    Jarvis, Jessie C.
    Jones, Benjamin L.
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Global challenges for seagrass conservation2019In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 801-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seagrasses, flowering marine plants that form underwater meadows, play a significant global role in supporting food security, mitigating climate change and supporting biodiversity. Although progress is being made to conserve seagrass meadows in select areas, most meadows remain under significant pressure resulting in a decline in meadow condition and loss of function. Effective management strategies need to be implemented to reverse seagrass loss and enhance their fundamental role in coastal ocean habitats. Here we propose that seagrass meadows globally face a series of significant common challenges that must be addressed from a multifaceted and interdisciplinary perspective in order to achieve global conservation of seagrass meadows. The six main global challenges to seagrass conservation are (1) a lack of awareness of what seagrasses are and a limited societal recognition of the importance of seagrasses in coastal systems; (2) the status of many seagrass meadows are unknown, and up-to-date information on status and condition is essential; (3) understanding threatening activities at local scales is required to target management actions accordingly; (4) expanding our understanding of interactions between the socio-economic and ecological elements of seagrass systems is essential to balance the needs of people and the planet; (5) seagrass research should be expanded to generate scientific inquiries that support conservation actions; (6) increased understanding of the linkages between seagrass and climate change is required to adapt conservation accordingly. We also explicitly outline a series of proposed policy actions that will enable the scientific and conservation community to rise to these challenges. We urge the seagrass conservation community to engage stakeholders from local resource users to international policy-makers to address the challenges outlined here, in order to secure the future of the world’s seagrass ecosystems and maintain the vital services which they supply.

  • 5.
    van Keulen, Mike
    et al.
    Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems, Harry Butler Institute, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
    Nordlund, Lina Mtwana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C.
    Sustainable Places Research Institute, Cardiff University, 33 Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3BA, UK.
    Towards recognition of seagrasses, and their sustainable management2018In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 134, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 5 of 5
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