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  • 1.
    Chapurlat, Elodie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Anderson, Joseph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Friberg, Magne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Sletvold, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Diel pattern of floral scent emission matches the relative importance of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators in populations of Gymnadenia conopsea2018In: Annals of Botany, ISSN 0305-7364, E-ISSN 1095-8290, Vol. 121, p. 711-721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    Floral scent is considered an integral component of pollination syndromes, and its composition and timing of emission are thus expected to match the main pollinator type and time of activity. While floral scent differences among plant species with different pollination systems can be striking, studies on intraspecific variation are sparse, which limits our understanding of the role of pollinators in driving scent divergence.

    Methods

    Here, we used dynamic headspace sampling to quantify floral scent emission and composition during the day and at night in the natural habitat of six Scandinavian populations of the fragrant orchid Gymnadenia conopsea. We tested whether diel scent emission and composition match pollinator type by comparing four populations in southern Sweden, where nocturnal pollinators are more important for plant reproductive success than are diurnal pollinators, with two populations in central Norway, where the opposite is true. To determine to what extent scent patterns quantified in the field reflected plasticity, we also measured scent emission in a common growth chamber environment.

    Key Results

    Both scent composition and emission rates differed markedly between day and night, but only the latter varied significantly among populations. The increase in scent emission rate at night was considerably stronger in the Swedish populations compared with the Norwegian populations. These patterns persisted when plants were transferred to a common environment, suggesting a genetic underpinning of the scent variation.

    Conclusions

    The results are consistent with a scenario where spatial variation in relative importance of nocturnal and diurnal pollinators has resulted in selection for different scent emission rhythms. Our study highlights the importance of adding a characterization of diel variation of scent emission rates to comparative studies of floral scent, which so far have often focused on scent composition only.

  • 2.
    Chapurlat, Elodie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Ågren, Jon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Anderson, Joseph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Friberg, Magne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution. Lund Univ, Dept Biol, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden.
    Sletvold, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Conflicting selection on floral scent emission in the orchid Gymnadenia conopsea2019In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 222, no 4, p. 2009-2022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Floral scent is a crucial trait for pollinator attraction. Yet only a handful of studies have estimated selection on scent in natural populations and no study has quantified the relative importance of pollinators and other agents of selection. In the fragrant orchid Gymnadenia conopsea, we used electroantennographic data to identify floral scent compounds detected by local pollinators and quantified pollinator-mediated selection on emission rates of 10 target compounds as well as on flowering start, visual display and spur length. Nocturnal pollinators contributed more to reproductive success than diurnal pollinators, but there was significant pollinator-mediated selection on both diurnal and nocturnal scent emission. Pollinators selected for increased emission of two compounds and reduced emission of two other compounds, none of which were major constituents of the total bouquet. In three cases, pollinator-mediated selection was opposed by nonpollinator-mediated selection, leading to weaker or no detectable net selection. Our study demonstrates that minor scent compounds can be targets of selection, that pollinators do not necessarily favour stronger scent signalling, and that some scent compounds are subject to conflicting selection from pollinators and other agents of selection. Hence, including floral scent traits into selection analysis is important for understanding the mechanisms behind floral evolution.

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