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  • 1.
    Backman, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Bodin, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Bucht, Gösta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Maxhall, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Sjölie, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Sondell, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    easyADL – Wearable Support System for Independent Life despite Dementia2006In: ACM CHI 2006 Workshop onDesigning Technology for People with Cognitive Impairments, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper outlines the easyADL project, a two-year project investigating the possibility of using wearable technology to assist people suffering the dementia disease in performing Activities of Daily Living (ADL). An introduction to the egocentric interaction modeling framework is provided and the virtual reality based development methodology is discusssed.

  • 2.
    Baskar, Jayalakshmi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Yan, Chunli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Yekeh, Farahnaz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Personalisation and user models for support in daily living2012In: The 27th annual workshop of the Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society (SAIS), 14–15 May 2012 / [ed] Lars Karlsson, Julien Bidot, 2012, p. 7-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the interest in developing personalised applications for home environment has grown since it has a wide reach in helping people in their daily activities. However, for our purposes the concept activities of daily living also need to include work and leisure activities not necessarily performed in home environments. In this article, we describe an ongoing effort to develop a generic framework for assessing ability and tailoring of support applications in the health domain. We also give an overview of the approaches that have been adopted for personalisation and user modelling to various application areas. Suggestions of future development are provided.

  • 3.
    Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Agent-supported assessment for adaptive and personalized ambient assisted living2011In: Trends in practical applications of agents and multiagent systems / [ed] Juan M. Corchado, Bajo Pérez, Kasper Hallenborg, Paulina Golinska and Rafael Corchuelo, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, Vol. 90, p. 25-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing approaches to ambient assisted living (AAL) often fail to consider a human agent's needs from a holistic perspective. In particular the regular assessment of their changing abilities, skills and limitations are often treated as a separate matter in healthcare, thereby affecting the possibilities to provide support tailored to their current condition. Therefore, the objective of this work is to integrate assessment done by the healthcare professional into the framework of AAL. We propose a framework based on a model for activity-centered modeling of knowledge and interaction tailored to users (ACKTUS) and an egocentric interaction model. We exemplify the interaction between system modules as agent dialogues in assessment and adaptation for supporting an older adult in a home environment.

  • 4.
    Nieves, Juan Carlos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Modeling Actions Based on a Situative Space Model for Recognizing Human Activities2012In: Artificial Intelligence: Methodology, Systems, and Applications, Springer, 2012, p. 266-275Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human activities usually have a motive and are driven bygoal directed sequence of actions. Recognizing and supporting humanactivities is an important challenge for ambient assisted living of elderlyin their home environment. By understanding an activity as a sequence ofactions, we explore action specification languages for recognizing humanactivities. In this setting, we analyze the role of the situative space modelfor modeling indoor human activities in terms of an action specificationlanguage.

  • 5.
    Pederson, Thomas
    et al.
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    A situative space model for mobile mixed-reality computing2011In: IEEE pervasive computing, ISSN 1536-1268, E-ISSN 1558-2590, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a situative space model that links the physical and virtual realms and sets the stage for complex human-computer interaction defined by what a human agent can see, hear, and touch, at any given point in time.

  • 6.
    Pederson, Thomas
    et al.
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Towards a model for egocentric interaction with physical and virtual objects2010In: Proceedings of the 6th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction:: Extending Boundaries, 2010, New York, USA: ACM Press, 2010, p. 755-758Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designers of mobile context-aware systems are struggling with the problem of conceptually incorporating the real world into the system design. We present a body-centric modeling framework (as opposed to device-centric) that incorporates physical and virtual objects of interest on the basis of proximity and human perception, framed in the context of an emerging "egocentric" interaction paradigm.

  • 7.
    Pederson, Thomas
    et al.
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Piccinno, Antonio
    Dip. di Informatica, Università degli Studi di Bari.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Ardito, Carmelo
    Dip. di Informatica, Università degli Studi di Bari.
    Caporusso, Nicholas
    Dip. di Informatica, Università degli Studi di Bari.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Framing the Next-Generation ‘Desktop’ using Proximity and Human Perception2008In: ACM CHI 2008 Conference Workshop on User Interface Description Languages for Next-Generation User Interfaces, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personal computing, and therefore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), is becoming a seamlessly integrated part of everyday activity down to the point where "computing" is inseparable from "activity". A modelling problem occurs in these emerging mobile and ubiquitous computing situations because it is hard to determine the spatial and operational limits of an ongoing activity, for the human performing the activity, for the computer system monitoring and/or supporting it, as well as for the modeller observing it. Also, it is an open issue how to model the causal relations between physical (real world) and virtual (digital world) phenomena that these "intelligent environments" can be programmed to maintain, whether defined by software engineers or the end-users themselves. We propose a modeling framework that addresses the above mentioned issues and present our initial attempts to create a User Interface Description Language (UIDL) based on the framework.

  • 8.
    Pederson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    A situative space model for distributed multimodal interaction2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop paper presents a body-centered model of human-environment interaction based on proximal and perceptional relationships between the human actor and objects of interest (physical objects, virtual objects, and mediators). The model is applied to a real world scenario and also discussed as a tool for designing a distributed multimodal interaction infrastructure.

  • 9.
    Pederson, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Towards an activity-aware wearable computing platform based on an egocentric interaction model2007In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Ubiquitous Computing Systems, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 211-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present our egocentric interaction model for recognizing and supporting everyday human activities. We explain how it allows designers of ubiquitous computing systems to view physical (real) and virtual (digital) objects as residing in one single space and how sets of objects in the vicinity of a specific human actor can be classified based on human perceptual characteristics such as what can be observed and what can be manipulated. We also propose a wearable computer architecture that is based on the egocentric interaction model which potentially could facilitate the development of Ubiquitous Computing applications by letting an operating system take care of maintaining communication with worn and instrumented sensors as well as computing devices. Finally, we present our first steps in implementing an activity-aware wearable support system for people suffering mild dementia based on the proposed model and architecture.

  • 10.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Egocentric interaction for ambient intelligence2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambient intelligence refers to the vision of computationally augmented everyday environments that are sensitive, adaptive and responsive to humans and intelligently support their daily lives. Ambient ecologies are the infrastructures of ambient intelligence. To enable system developers to frame and manage the dynamic and complex interaction of humans with ambient ecologies consisting of a mixture of physical (real) and virtual (digital) objects, novel interaction paradigms are needed.

    Traditional interaction paradigms like the WIMP (windows, icon, menus, and pointing devices) paradigm for desktop computing operate in a closed world, unaware of the physical, social and cultural context. They restrict human perception and action to screen, mouse and keyboard with the assumption that human attention will be fully devoted to interaction with the computer. Emerging interaction paradigms for ambient intelligence are typically centered on specific devices, specific computing environments or specific human capabilities. Also, many of them are driven by technological advancements rather than viewing the human agent as their starting point. A principled, theoretical approach centered in the individual human agent, their situation and activities that are comprehensive and integrated while at the same time instrumental in the design of ambient ecologies has been lacking.

    This thesis introduces egocentric interaction as an approach towards the modeling of ambient ecologies with the distinguishing feature of taking the human agent’s body, situation and activities as center of reference, as opposed to the more common device-centric approaches in facilitating human-environment interaction. Egocentric interaction is encapsulated in a number of assumptions and principles such as situatedness, the proximity principle, the physical-virtual equity principle, perception and action instead of “input” and “output,” and activity-centeredness. A situative space model is proposed based on some of these principles. It is intended to capture what a specific human agent can perceive and not perceive, reach and not reach at any given moment in time. The situative space model is for the egocentric interaction paradigm what the virtual desktop is for the WIMP interaction paradigm: more or less everything of interest to a specific human agent is assumed and supposed to happen here.

    In addition, the conception and implementation of the easy ADL ecology based on egocentric interaction, comprising of smart objects, a personal activity-centric middleware, ambient intelligence applications aimed at everyday activity support, and a human agent literally in the middle of it all is described. The middleware was developed to address important challenges in ambient intelligence: (1) tracking and managing smart objects; (2) tracking a human agent’s situative spaces; (3) recognizing human activities and actions; (4) managing and facilitating human-environment interaction; and (5) to ease up the development of ambient intelligence applications.

    The easy ADL ecology was first simulated in immersive virtual reality, and then set up physically as a living laboratory to evaluate: (1) the technological and technical performance of individual middleware components, (2) to perform a user experience evaluation assessing various aspects of user satisfaction in relation to the support offered by the easy ADL ecology, and (3) to use it as a research test bed for addressing challenges in ambient intelligence. While it is problematic to directly compare the “proof-of-concept” easy ADL ecology with related research efforts, it is clear from the user experience evaluation that the subjects were positive with the services it offered. 

  • 11.
    Surie, Dipak
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Evaluation and Integration of Risk Management in CMMI and ISO/IEC 155042004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During software development, software companies are exposed to risks (unwanted events) which lead to economic and competitive loss. Risk management technique can be used to minimise the loss in software projects. Some software process improvement models include risk management among their guidelines. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and analyse how risk management is handled by Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) and International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commision (ISO/IEC) 15504. A risk management framework is used in this evaluation study. The results of this study show that risk management in CMMI is more comprehensive than ISO/IEC 15504, but both models handle risk factors to appreciable extent.

  • 12.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Berker, Baydan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Proxemics Awareness in Kitchen AS-A-PAL: Tracking Objects and Human in Perspective2013In: Intelligent Environments (IE), 2013 9th International Conference on, 2013, p. 157-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatial relationships or proxemics play an important role in how humans interact with other people and objects in an environment, yet spatial relationships are not thoroughly exploited within smart environments. Objects designed to be aware of its proxemics facilitate implicit and explicit interaction with humans. Kitchen As-A-Pal is an interactive smart kitchen that provides an infrastructure for sensing and modeling proxemics among objects and human using a sonar network and RFID technology. Position, movement, identity and location are the proxemics dimensions explored in kitchen As-A-Pal. A pilot study of a breakfast scenario comprising of 9 everyday activities in Kitchen As-A-Pal using 2 subjects yielded promising proximity tracking results with a precision of 100% and a recall of 68.3% for spatial zones with high and medium average time percentages (ATP). Also, 53.21% ATP has more than 95% recall values.

  • 13.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Roy, Dilip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Egocentric interaction as a tool for designing ambient ecologies: the case of the easy ADL ecology2012In: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, ISSN 1574-1192, E-ISSN 1873-1589, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 597-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The visions of ambient intelligence demand novel interaction paradigms that enable designers and system developers to frame and manage the dynamic and complex interaction between humans and environments populated with physical (real) and virtual (digital) objects of interest. So far, many proposed approaches have adhered to a device-centric stance when including virtual objects into the ambient ecology; a stance inherited from existing interaction paradigms for mobile and stationary interactive devices. In this article, we introduce egocentric interaction as an alternative approach, taking the human agent's body and mind as the center of reference. We show how this interaction paradigm has influenced both the conception and implementation of the easy ADL ecology, comprising of smart objects, a personal activity-centric middleware attempting to simplify interaction given available resources, ambient intelligence applications aimed at everyday activity support, and a human agent literally in the middle of it all.

  • 14.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Jäckel, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Situative space tracking within smart environments2010In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Intelligent Environments, IE 2010, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2010, p. 152-157Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our efforts in modeling and tracking a human agent’s situation based on their possibilities to perceive and act upon objects (both physical and virtual) within smart environments. A Situative Space Model is proposed. WLAN signal-strength-based situative space tracking system that positions objects within individual situative spaces (without tracking their absolute positions) distributed across multiple modalities like vision, audio, and touch is presented. As a proof-of-concept, a preliminary evaluation of the tracking system was performed by two subjects within a living-laboratory smart home environment where a global tracking precision of 83.4% and a recall of 88.6% were obtained.

  • 15.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lagriffoul, Fabien
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Sjölie, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Activity recognition based on intra and extra manipulation of everyday objects2007In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Ubiquitous Computing Systems, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 196-210Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognizing activities based on an actor's interaction with everyday objects is an important research approach within ubiquitous computing. We present a recognition approach which complement objects grabbed or released information with the object's internal state changes (as an effect of intra manipulation) and the object's external state changes with reference to other objects (as an effect of extra manipulation). The concept of Intra manipulation is inspired by the fact that many everyday objects change their internal state when manipulated by the human actor, while extra manipulation is motivated by the fact that humans commonly rearrange the spatial relations between everyday objects as part of their activities. A detailed evaluation of our prototype activity recognition system in virtual reality (VR) environment is presented as a "proof of concept". We have obtained a recognition precision of 92% on the activity-level and 81% on the action-level among 15 everyday home activities. Virtual reality was used as a test-bed in order to speed up the design process of our activity recognition system, allowing us to compensate for the limitations with currently available sensing technologies and to compare the contributions of intra manipulation and extra manipulation for activity recognition.

  • 16.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Laguionie, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Wireless sensor networking of everyday objects in a smart home environment2008In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing, 2008, IEEE Computer Society, 2008, p. 189-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within a smart home environment the information processing is supposed to be thoroughly integrated into everyday objects. This introduces the need to keep track of the everyday objects and their state changes produced based on the userpsilas interaction with them. Such information is useful in recognizing the userpsilas activities, situations, etc. In this paper we present a ZigBee communication protocol based wireless sensor networking of 42 everyday objects (embedded with 81 simple state change sensors of 8 sensor types) in a living laboratory smart home environment. The system was evaluated in a realistic setup with background noise. The sensing module has shown promising results with an overall system precision of 91.2% and a recall of 98.8% in keeping track of the state changes to everyday objects. The signal strength measure above the acceptable limit of >10 dB to obtain reliable data communication was found to be 97.5% checked at 8 different locations in a home environment. Finally the transmission-reception range was evaluated to be 33 m with a single wall obstruction and 19 m with multiple wall obstruction in an indoor environment.

  • 17.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Qureshi, Arslan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Kitchen AS-A-PAL: Exploring Smart Objects as Containers, Surfaces and Actuators2013In: Ambient Intelligence - Software and Applications: 4th International Symposium on Ambient Intelligence (ISAmI 2013) / [ed] Ad van Berlo, Kasper Hallenborg, Juan M. Corchado Rodríguez, Dante I. Tapia, Paulo Novais, Springer Publishing Company, 2013, Vol. 219, p. 171-178Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advancements have taken us closer to the "kitchen of the future" where everyday kitchen activities are seamlessly integrated with smart computing services. While there exist smart kitchen approaches, the explorative nature of the field encourages novel designs. This paper follows the trend by describing the design and development of the Kitchen AS-A-PAL, an infrastructure for facilitating smart kitchen services. Smart objects are the building blocks of Kitchen AS-A-PAL where three types of smart objects namely Containers, Surfaces and Actuators are explored through smart kitchen applications including interactive cookbook, health'n shopping and kaffe, god morgon.

  • 18.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Partonia, Saeed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Human Sensing using Computer Vision for Personalized Smart Spaces2013In: 2013 IEEE 10th International Conference on and 10th International Conference on Autonomic and Trusted Computing (UIC/ATC) Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing, 2013, p. 487-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart spaces are everyday environments augmented with computing technologies that enhance human experience and activity performance. Continuous recognition of the presence of people, their identity, location, movement and activity patterns in real-time is a key challenge to address if smart spaces are to be envisioned as personalized and adaptive spaces. This paper introduces the multiple technologies available for human sensing and identification, discussing their advantages and disadvantages. In particular, Kitchen As-A-Pal is described as a smart space with real-time human sensing capabilities using computer vision by fusing fisher face recognition and skeletal tracking approaches. A wall-mounted Kinect is used for both single occupant and multi-occupant settings in kitchen As-A-Pal. The fused approach gives human identity recognition accuracy of 91.75% precision and 66% recall values for single occupant setting with good smart space coverage. Challenges do exist for human identity recognition in multi-occupant settings.

  • 19.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    An activity-centered wearable computing infrastructure for intelligent environment applications2007In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Embedded and Ubiquitous Computing, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 456-465Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many research efforts that focus on converting everyday environments into intelligent and computationally active environments that support and enhance the abilities of its occupants in executing their activities. Such environments must have the ability to recognize the activities performed by its occupant, maintain a real-time model of the environment, address the occupant's privacy and personalization issues, and provide interaction capabilities in a way the occupant would with other people. In this paper we present an activity-centered wearable computing infrastructure for designing intelligent environment applications based on the occupant's usage and storage of everyday objects in that environment. Four components namely object manager, situative space monitor, activity recognizer and egocentric interaction manager are introduced and described in detail. A prototypical intelligent home environment capable of supporting 15 Activities of Daily Living with an activity recognition precision of 92% is presented as a "proof of concept" in a virtual reality (VR) simulated home environment.

  • 20.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    A Smart Home Experience using Egocentric Interaction Design Principles2012In: 15TH IEEE International Conference On Computational Science And Engineering (CSE 2012) / 10TH IEEE/IFIP International Conference On Embedded And Ubiquitous Computing (EUC 2012), 2012, p. 656-665Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The landscape of ubiquitous computing comprising of numerous interconnected computing devices seamlessly integrated within everyday environments introduces a need to do research beyond human-computer interaction: in particular incorporate human-environment interaction. While the technological advancements have driven the field of ubiquitous computing, the ultimate focus should center on human agents and their experience in interacting with ubiquitous computing systems offering smart services. This paper describes egocentric interaction as a human body-centered interaction paradigm for framing human-environment interaction using proximity and human perception. A smart home environment capable of supporting physical-virtual activities and designed according to egocentric interaction principles is used for exploring the human experience it offers, yielding positive results as a proof of concept.

  • 21.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Human cognition as a foundation for the emerging egocentric interaction paradigm2012In: Human-Computer Interaction: The Agency Perspective, Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, p. 349-374Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an “egocentric interaction paradigm” (EIP) centered on human agents rather than on the notion of user. More specifically, this paradigm is based on perception, action, intention and attention capabilities and limitations of human agents. Traditional and emerging interaction paradigms are typically related to a specific computing environment, devices or human capabilities. The novelty of the proposed approach stems from aiming at developing a comprehensive and integrated theoretical approach, centered on individual human agent. Development in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) has been closely related to the understanding and utilization of natural human skills and abilities. This work attempts to understand and model a human agent, and in particular their cognitive capabilities in facilitating HCI. The EIP is based on principles like situatedness and embodiment, the physical-virtual equity principle, and the proximity principle. A situative space model built upon our understanding of human cognition is described in detail, followed by our experience in exploring the egocentric interaction paradigm in the easy ADL home.

  • 22.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    The easy ADL home: A physical-virtual approach to domestic living2010In: Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments, ISSN 1876-1364, E-ISSN 1876-1372, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 287-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart environments worthy of the name need to capture, interpret, and support human activities that take place within their realms. Most existing efforts tend to focus on either real world activities or activities taking place in the virtual world accessed through digital devices. However, as digital computation continues to permeate our everyday real world environments, and as the border between physical and digital continues to blur for the human agents acting in these environments, we need system design approaches that can cope with human activities that span the physical-virtual gap. In this paper, we present such an approach and use it for designing a smart home intended to support Activities of Daily Living (ADL). The easy ADL home is designed based on a wearable personal server that runs a personal ADL support middleware and a set of computationally augmented everyday objects within the easy ADL home. An initial qualitative study of the system involving 20 subjects revealed a highly positive attitude (score 4.37 out of 5) towards the system's capability of co-locating and synchronizing physical and virtual events throughout the everyday activity scenarios, while classical usability aspects in particular related to the gesture-based input (score 2.89 out of 5) leaves room for improvement.

  • 23.
    Surie, Dipak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Pederson, Thomas
    Innovative Communication Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Lagriffoul, Fabien
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Sjölie, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Activity recognition using an egocentric perspective of everyday objects2007In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2007, p. 246-257Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an activity recognition approach based on the tracking of a specific human actor’s current object manipulation actions, complemented by two kinds of situational information: 1) the set of objects that are visually observable (inside the “observable space”) and 2) technically graspable (inside the “manipulable space”). This “egocentric” model is inspired by situated action theory and offers the advantage of not depending on technology for absolute positioning of neither the human nor the objects. Applied in an immersive Virtual Reality environment, the proposed activity recognition approach shows a recognition precision of 89% on the activity-level and 76% on the action-level among 10 everyday home activities.

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