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  • 1. Gheaus, Anca
    Children's rights, parental agency and the case for non-coercive responses to care drain2014In: Poverty, Agency and Human Rights / [ed] Diana Meyers, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Could There Ever Be a Duty to Have Children?2015In: Permissible Progeny? / [ed] Sarah Hannan, Samantha Brennan, Richard Vernon, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter argues that there is a collective responsibility to have enough children in order to ensure that people will not, in the future, suffer great harm due to depopulation. Moreover, if people stopped having children voluntarily, it could be legitimate for states to incentivize and maybe even coerce individuals to bear and rear children. Various arguments against the enforceability of an individual duty to bear and rear children are examined. Coercing people to have children would come at significant moral cost; however, none of the arguments against enforceability seem decisive. The existence of a collective responsibility to have children bears on the question of whether parents and non-parents ought to shoulder the costs of childbearing and child rearing together.

  • 3.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Feminism and gender2015In: Bloomsbury Companion to Political Philosophy / [ed] Andrew Fiala, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. University of Sheffield.
    Gender and Distributive JusticeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses gender in relation to the most influential current accounts of distributive justice. There are various disparities in the benefits and burdens of social cooperation between women and men. Which of these, if any, one identifies as indicative of gender injustice will depend on the theory of distributive justice that one endorses. Theoretical decisions concerning the role of personal responsibility, the goods whose distribution is relevant for justice, and the site of justice - institutions-only or individual behaviour, too - all influence how one thinks about gender justice.

  • 5.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Department of Philosophy, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Hikers in Flip-Flops: Luck Egalitarianism, Democratic Equality and the Distribuenda of Justice2018In: Journal of Applied Philosophy, ISSN 0264-3758, E-ISSN 1468-5930, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 54-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article has two aims. First, to show that a version of luck egalitarianism that includes relational goods amongst its distribuenda can, as a matter of internal logic, account for one of the core beliefs of relational egalitarianism. Therefore, there will be important extensional overlap, at the level of domestic justice, between luck egalitarianism and relational egalitarianism. This is an important consideration in assessing the merits of and relationship between the two rival views. Second, to provide some support for including relational goods, including those advocated by relational egalitarianism, on the distribuenda of justice and therefore to put in a good word for the overall plausibility of this conception of justice. I show why relational egalitarians, too, have reason to sympathise with this proposal.

  • 6.
    Gheaus, Anca
    University of Sheffield.
    The feasibility constraint on the concept of justice2013In: Philosophical quarterly (Print), ISSN 0031-8094, E-ISSN 1467-9213, Vol. 63, no 253, p. 445-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a widespread belief that, conceptually, justice cannot require what we cannot achieve. This belief is sometimes used by defenders of so-called 'non-ideal theories of justice' to criticise so-called 'ideal theories of justice'. I refer to this claim as 'the feasibility constraint on the concept of justice' and argue against it. I point to its various implausible implications and contend that a willingness to apply the label 'unjust' to some regrettable situations that we cannot fix is going to enhance the action-guiding potential of a conception of justice, by providing an aspirational ideal. This is possible on the condition that, at all times, we cannot specify with certainty the limits of what is feasible for us collectively. The rejection of the feasibility constraint entails that there can be injustice without perpetrators; this is a theoretical price worth paying.

  • 7. Gheaus, Anca
    The 'intrinsic goods of childhood' and the just society2015In: The Nature of Children's Well-Being / [ed] Alexander Bagattini, Colin Macleod, Springer, 2015, p. 35-52Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The parental love argument against ‘designing’ babies: the harm in knowing that one has been selected or enhanced2014In: The right to know and the right not to know: genetic privacy and responsibility / [ed] R. Chadwick, M. Levitt and D. Shickle, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, 2, p. 151-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Philosophy, University of Sheffield.
    The right to parent and duties concerning future generations2016In: The Journal of Political Philosophy, ISSN 0963-8016, E-ISSN 1467-9760, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 487-508Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Philosophy Department, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Three Cheers for the Token Woman!2015In: Journal of Applied Philosophy, ISSN 0264-3758, E-ISSN 1468-5930, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 163-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns about the under-representation of female academic philosophers and about the stereotype that philosophy is best done by men have recently led to efforts to make academic philosophy a more inclusive discipline. An example is the Gendered Conference Campaign, encouraging event organisers and volume editors to include women amongst invited speakers and authors.

    Initiatives such as the GCC raise worries about tokenism. Potential invitees may be concerned about unfairness towards whose who would have been invited in their place in the absence of affirmative action and about the way in which affirmative action can (be perceived to) affect the quality of the conference or volume in question. And women philosophers often worry that, if formal rules or significant social pressures towards gender inclusiveness play a role in selection processes, their achievements will be discounted.

    I argue there is no good reason for these fears: there is no pure meritocracy in academia, nor is the ideal of pure meritocracy either feasible or desirable. There are several legitimate grounds — independent of professional competence — for including people in positions of visibility and prestige; gender is such a legitimate reason.

  • 11.
    Gheaus, Anca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Unfinished adults and defective children: on the nature and value of childhood2015In: Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, ISSN 1559-3061, E-ISSN 1559-3061, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value is entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic  value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a 'self of one's own', and experimenting one's way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue that children can have good lives, on several understandings of well-being – as a pleasurable state, as the satisfaction of simple desires or as the realisation of certain objective goods. In reply to the likely objection that only individuals capable of morality can have intrinsic value I explain why it is plausible that children have sufficient moral agency to be as deserving of respect as adults.

  • 12.
    Gheaus, Anca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. University of Sheffield.
    Herzog, Lisa
    Institut für Sozialforschung Frankfurt am Main.
    The goods of work (other than money!)2016In: Journal of social philosophy, ISSN 0047-2786, E-ISSN 1467-9833, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 70-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evaluation of labour markets and of particular jobs ought to be sensitive to a plurality of benefits and burdens of work. We use the term 'the goods of work' to refer to those benefits of work that cannot be obtained in exchange for money and that can be enjoyed mostly or exclusively in the context of work. Drawing on empirical research and various philosophical traditions of thinking about work we identify four goods of work: 1) attaining various types of excellence; 2) making a social contribution; 3) experiencing community; and 4) gaining social recognition. Our account of the goods of work can be read as unpacking the ways in which work can be meaningful. The distribution of the goods of work is a concern of justice for two conjoint reasons: First, they are part of the conception of the good of a large number of individuals. Second, in societies without an unconditional income and in which most people are not independently wealthy, paid work is non-optional and workers have few, if any, occasions to realize these goods outside their job. Taking into account the plurality of the goods of work and their importance for justice challenges the theoretical and political status quo, which focuses mostly on justice with regard to the distribution of income. We defend this account against the libertarian challenge that a free labour market gives individuals sufficient options to realise the goods of work important to them, and discuss the challenge from state neutrality. In the conclusion, we hint towards possible implications for today's labour markets.

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