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  • 1.
    Brink, Rob C.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Schlosser, Tom P. C.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Colo, Dino
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    van Stralen, Marijn
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vincken, Koen L.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Malmqvist, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kruyt, Moyo C.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Castelein, Rene M.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Anterior Spinal Overgrowth Is the Result of the Scoliotic Mechanism and Is Located in the Disc2017In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 818-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To investigate the presence and magnitude of anterior spinal overgrowth in neuromuscular scoliosis and compare this with the same measurements in idiopathic scoliosis and healthy spines. Summary of Background Data. Anterior spinal overgrowth has been described as a potential driver for the onset and progression of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Whether this anterior overgrowth is specific for AIS or also present in nonidiopathic scoliosis has not been reported. Methods. Supine computed tomography (CT) scans of thirty AIS patients (thoracic Cobb 21-81 degrees), thirty neuromuscular (NM) scoliotic patients (thoracic Cobb 19-101 degrees) and 30 nonscoliotic controls were used. The difference in length in per cents between the anterior and posterior side {[(Delta A-P)/P] * 100%, abbreviated to A-P%} of each vertebral body and intervertebral disc, and between the anterior side of the spine and the spinal canal (A-C%) were determined. Results. The A-P% of the thoracic curves did not differ between the AIS (+1.2 perpendicular to 2.2%) and NM patients (+0.9 +/- 4.1%, P = 0.663), both did differ, however, from the same measurements in controls (-3.0 +/- 1.6%; Pamp;lt; 0.001) and correlated linearly with the Cobb angle (AIS r = 0.678, NM r = 0.687). Additional anterior length was caused by anterior elongation of the discs (AIS: A-P% disc +17.5 +/- 12.7% vs. A-P% body - 2.5 +/- 2.6%; Pamp;lt; 0.001, NM: A-P% disc + 19.1 +/- 18.0% vs. A-P% body -3.5 +/- 5.1%; Pamp;lt; 0.001). The A-C% T1-S1 in AIS and NM patients were similar (+ 7.9 +/- 1.8% and + 8.7 +/- 4.0%, P = 0.273), but differed from the controls (+4.2 +/- 3.3%; Pamp;lt; 0.001). Conclusion. So called anterior overgrowth has been postulated as a possible cause for idiopathic scoliosis, but apparently it occurs in scoliosis with a known origin as well. This suggests that it is part of a more generalized scoliotic mechanism, rather than its cause. The fact that the intervertebral discs contribute more to this increased anterior length than the vertebral bodies suggests an adaptation to altered loading, rather than a primary growth disturbance.

  • 2.
    Brink, Rob C.
    et al.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Schlösser, Tom P. C.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands..
    Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging and Functional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Ohlin, Acke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Castelein, René M.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, G05.228, University Medical Center Utrecht, P.O. Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. r.m.castelein@umcutrecht.nl..
    Vrtovec, Tomaž
    Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia..
    Three-dimensional pelvic incidence is much higher in (thoraco)lumbar scoliosis than in controls2019In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 544-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The pelvic incidence (PI) is used to describe the sagittal spino-pelvic alignment. In previous studies, radiographs were used, leading to less accuracy in establishing the three-dimensional (3D) spino-pelvic parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the 3D sagittal spino-pelvic alignment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) subjects and non-scoliotic controls.

    Methods

    Thirty-seven female AIS patients that underwent preoperative supine low-dose computed tomography imaging of the spine, hips and pelvis as part of their general workup were included and compared to 44 non-scoliotic age-matched female controls. A previously validated computerized method was used to measure the PI in 3D, as the angle between the line orthogonal to the inclination of the sacral endplate and the line connecting the center of the sacral endplate with the hip axis.

    Results

    The PI was on average 46.8° ± 12.4° in AIS patients and 41.3° ± 11.4° in controls (p = 0.025), with a higher PI in Lenke type 5 curves (50.6° ± 16.2°) as compared to controls (p = 0.042), whereas the Lenke type 1 curves (45.9° ± 12.2°) did not differ from controls (p = 0.141).

    Conclusion

    Lenke type 5 curves show a significantly higher PI than controls, whereas the Lenke type 1 curves did not differ from controls. This suggests a role of pelvic morphology and spino-pelvic alignment in the pathogenesis of idiopathic scoliosis. Further longitudinal studies should explore the exact role of the PI in the initiation and progression of different AIS types.

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  • 3.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Deformity in Three Dimensions2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional deformity of the spine. Even though it has been known for centuries, treatment of the deformity has focused on correcting only in the frontal plane. In the last decades, the need for three-dimensional assessment regarding scoliosis has been highlighted to better understand the cause and the principles of treating scoliosis. The overall aim of this dissertation is to provide knowledge to assess scoliosis as a three-dimensional problem.

    The severity of scoliosis is measured with the Cobb angle from standing radiographs. Computed tomography (CT) examinations are used throughout this thesis. The first paper investigates the difference in Cobb angle measured from standing radiographs and supine CT examinations. The standing radiographs had larger Cobb angles with a mean difference of 11° and a linear correlation between the two examinations from 128 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) planned for surgery.

    The second paper compares the axial shape of vertebrae in 20 patients with AIS with a reference group. Clear asymmetry was observed in all vertebrae – superior and inferior end vertebrae as well as the apical vertebra – compared with corresponding vertebrae among the reference group. The asymmetry was most pronounced in the apical vertebra. A novel parameter, frontal vertebral body rotation (FVBR), was introduced to describe the internal rotation of the vertebrae in the axial plane.

    Pelvic incidence (PI) is a measurement of the position of the sacrum in relation to the femoral heads. This is relevant in scoliosis because PI determines the pelvic configuration acting as a foundation to the spine. PI has traditionally been measured from standing radiographs. The third study investigates PI three-dimensionally, based on low-dose CT examinations, in 37 patients with Lenke type 1 or 5 curves compared with a reference group. A significantly higher PI was observed in patients with Lenke type 5 curves compared with the reference group and patients with Lenke type 1 curves.

    Severe AIS is treated with corrective surgery. Two approaches are available: the predominant posterior approach and the anterior approach. In the fourth paper, these two approaches are evaluated with regard to three-dimensional correction, how well the correction is maintained over a 2-year follow-up and patient-reported outcome measures. Twenty-seven patients treated with the posterior approach and 26 patients treated with the anterior approach, all with Lenke type 1 curves, were included. Fewer vertebrae were fused in the anterior group, but the posterior group had a better correction of the deformity in the frontal plane. No difference was observed regarding three-dimensional correction and patient-reported outcome measures.

    AIS is truly a complex three-dimensional deformity. More research is needed to fully comprehend the complexity of the scoliotic spine.

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  • 4.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Brink, Rob C.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Malmqvist, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Schlösser, Tom P.C.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    van Stralen, Marijn
    Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Abul-Kasim, Kasim
    Division of Neuroradiology, Diagnostic Centre for Imaging and Functional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ohlin, Acke
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Castelein, René M.
    Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Surgical Outcomes of Anterior Versus Posterior Fusion in Lenke Type 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis2019In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 44, no 14, p. E823-E832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mini Patients with Lenke type 1 idiopathic scoliosis can be effectively managed surgically with an anterior or posterior approach. However, each approach has specific advantages and challenges, as described in this study, which must be considered before treating each patient.

    Study Design. Retrospective study.

    Objective. To describe surgical results in two and three dimensions and patient-reported outcomes of scoliosis treatment for Lenke type 1 idiopathic curves with an open anterior or posterior approach.

    Summary of Background Data. Different surgical techniques have been described to prevent curve progression and to restore spinal alignment in idiopathic scoliosis. The spine can be accessed via an anterior or a posterior approach. However, the surgical outcomes, especially in three dimensions, for different surgical approaches remain unclear.

    Methods. Cohorts of Lenke curve type 1 idiopathic scoliosis patients, after anterior or posterior spinal fusion were recruited, to measure curve characteristics on conventional radiographs, before and after surgery and after 2 years follow-up, whereas the vertebral axial rotation, true mid-sagittal anterior–posterior height ratio of individual structures, and spinal height differences were measured on 3D reconstructions of the pre- and postoperative supine low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans. Additionally, the intraoperative parameters were described and the patients completed the SRS-22 and EQ-5D-3L questionnaire postoperatively.

    Results. Fifty-three patients with Lenke curve type 1 idiopathic scoliosis (26 in the anterior cohort and 27 in the posterior cohort) were analyzed. Fewer vertebrae were instrumented in the anterior cohort compared with the posterior cohort (P < 0.001), with less surgery time and lower intraoperative blood loss (P < 0.001). The Cobb angle correction of the primary thoracic curve directly after surgery was 57 ± 12% in the anterior cohort and 73 ± 12% in the posterior cohort (P < 0.001) and 55 ± 13% and 66 ± 12% (P = 0.001) at 2 years follow-up. Postoperative 3D alignment restoration and questionnaires showed no significant differences between the cohorts.

    Conclusion. This study suggests that Lenke type 1 curves can be effectively managed surgically with either an open anterior or posterior approach. Each approach, however, has specific advantages and challenges, as described in this study, which must be considered before treating each patient.

    Level of evidence: 3

  • 5.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Forsberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Vertebral Axial Asymmetry in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.2018In: Spine Deformity, ISSN 2212-134X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 112-120.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design

    Retrospective study.

    Objectives

    To investigate parameters of axial vertebral deformation in patients with scoliosis compared to a control group, and to determine whether these parameters correlated with the severity of spine curvature, measured as the Cobb angle.

    Summary of Background Data

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common type of spinal deformity. Many studies have investigated vertebral deformation, in terms of wedging and pedicle deformations, but few studies have investigated actual structural changes within vertebrae.

    Methods

    This study included 20 patients with AIS (Lenke 1–3, mean age: 15.6 years, range: 11–20). We compared preoperative low-dose computed tomography(CT) examinations of patients with AIS to those of a control group matched for age and sex. The control individuals had no spinal deformity, but they were admitted to the emergency department for trauma CTs. We measured the Cobb angles and the axial vertebral rotation (AVR), axial vertebral bodyasymmetry (AVBA), and frontal vertebral body rotation (FVBR) for the superior end, inferior end, and apical vertebrae, with in-house–developed software. Correlations between entities were investigated with the Pearson correlation test.

    Results

    The average Cobb angles were 49.3° and 1.3° for the scoliotic and control groups, respectively. The patient and control groups showed significant differences in the AVRs of all three vertebra levels (p < .01), the AVBAs of the superior end and apical vertebrae (p < .008), and the FVBR of the apical vertebra (p = .011). Correlations were only found between the AVBA and FVBR in the superior end vertebra (r = 0.728, p < .001) and in the apical vertebra (r = 0.713, p < .001).

    Conclusions

    Compared with controls, patients with scoliosis showed clear morphologic differences in the midaxial plane vertebrae. Differences in AVR, AVBA, and FVBR were most pronounced at the apical vertebra. The FVBR provided valuable additional information about the internal rotation and deformation of vertebrae.

    Level of Evidence

    Level III.

  • 6.
    Vavruch, Ludvig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Spinal Surgery. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A Comparison of Cobb Angle: Standing Versus Supine Images of Late-Onset Idiopathic Scoliosis2016In: Polish Journal Of Radiology, ISSN 1733-134X, Vol. 81, p. 270-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Scoliosis is traditionally evaluated by measuring the Cobb angle in radiograph images taken while the patient is standing. However, low-dose computed tomography (CT) images, which are taken while the patient is in a supine position, provide new opportunities to evaluate scoliosis. Few studies have investigated how the patient's position, standing or supine, affects measurements. The purpose of this study was to compare the Cobb angle in images from patients while standing versus supine.less thanbr /greater thanMaterial/methods: A total of 128 consecutive patients (97 females and 21 males; mean age 15.5 [11-26] years) with late-onset scoliosis requiring corrective surgery were enrolled. One observer evaluated the type of curve (Lenke classification) and measured the Cobb angle in whole-spine radiography (standing) and scout images from low-dose CT (supine) were taken on the same day.less thanbr /greater thanResults: For all primary curves, the mean Cobb angle was 59 (SD 12) while standing and 48 (SD 12) while in the supine position, with a mean difference of 11 (SD 5). The correlation between primary standing and supine images had an r value of 0.899 (95% CI 0.860-0.928) and an intra-class correlation coefficient value of 0.969. The correlation between the difference in standing and supine images from primary and secondary curves had an r value of 0.340 (95% CI 0.177-0.484).less thanbr /greater thanConclusions: We found a strong correlation between the Cobb angle in images obtained while the patient was standing versus supine for primary and secondary curves. This study is only applicable for patients with severe curves requiring surgical treatment. It enables additional studies based on low-dose CT.

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