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  • 1.
    Daaland Wormdahl, Espen
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    ISO 20088-1 en iskald standard for testing av isolasjonsmaterialer2016In: Brandposten, no 55, p. 7-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Fjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Glansberg, Karin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Daaland Wormdahl, Espen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Jet fires and cryogenic spills: How to document extreme industrial incidents2019In: Sixth Magdeburg Fire and Explosion Days (MBE2019) conference proceedings, , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In industrial plants, such as oil platforms, refineries or onboard vessels carrying fuel, a rupture event of a pipeline could have dramatic consequences, as was demonstrated both in the Piper Alpha and Deepwater Horizon accidents. If surfaces are exposed to extreme conditions, both extreme cold (cryogenic spills) and extreme heat (jet fires), this can affect exposed surfaces, and can cause a domino effect of severe events.

  • 3.
    Fjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Sæter Bøe, Andreas
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Glansberg, Karin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Sesseng, Christian
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Storesund, Karolina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Brandt, Are W.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Energieffektive bygg og brannsikkerhet2019Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Jansson McNamee, Robert
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research.
    Storesund, Karolina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    The function of intumescent paint for steel during different fire exposures2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study the behaviour of four intumescent systems for steel was investigated experimentally. The main purpose of the study was to determine the behaviour of the systems during different fire scenarios including standardized furnace testing, tests in cone calorimeter and ad hoc tests including ceiling jets and fire plumes. The experimental campaign shows that two of the investigated systems did perform very poorly in the furnace tests compared to what they were designed for, despite being the systems having the best swelling in the cone calorimeter tests. This highlights the importance of adhesion at high temperature for this type of systems. Since adhesion is crucial a more relevant evaluation for this type of systems ought to be a test where the flows around the specimen can be characterized and controlled, i.e. a ceiling jet or a fire plume scenario. This is especially important as steel protected with intumescent systems are often used in large open spaces where local fire plumes and ceiling jets are expected.Key words: intumescent paint, steel, alternative exposure

  • 5.
    Jansson, Robert
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Storesund, Karolina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Stolen, Reidar
    Brandskyddsfärgers funktion vid olika brandscenarier2016In: Brandposten, no 54, p. 37-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Jansson, Robert
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Storesund, Karolina
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Nordløkken, Per Gunnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Fire Research AS, Norge.
    Intumescent paint systems exposed to different heating scenarios2016In: Interflam 2016: Conference Proceedings, 2016, p. 225-233Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Stolen, Reidar
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Fjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Heat flux in jet fires: New method for measuring the heat flux levels of jet fires2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Jet fires are ignited leakages of pressurized liquid or gaseous fuel. In jet fire testing for the offshore industry, heat flux is the defining factor for the accidental loads. NORSOK S001 [1] defines two different heat flux levels of 250 kW/m2 and 350 kW/m2 depending on the leak rate of hydrocarbons. These heat flux levels are used in risk analysis and define what type of fire load bearing structures and critical equipment need to be able to resist in a given area. Examples of such ratings can be “250 kW/m2 jet fire for 60 minutes”, “350 kW/m2 jet fire for 15 minutes” or any other combination based on calculations in the risk assessment. Combined with critical temperatures this defines the performance criteria for the passive fire protection. Each configuration of the passive fire protection needs to be tested and verified. Manufacturers of passive fire protection request fire tests to document their performance against jet fires with these various heat flux levels. The challenge is that the standard for testing passive fire protection against jet fires [2] does not define any heat flux level or any method to define or measure it. We have developed a method for defining and measuring the heat flux levels in jet fires. This method can be used when faced with the challenge of testing passive fire protection against specific levels of heat flux. The method includes a custom test rig that allows jet fire testing with different heat flux levels. A large number of tests have been performed to verify the reproducibility and repeatability of the method. Heat flux is defined as the flow of energy through a surface. The heat flux from a fire to an engulfed surface of an object is dependent on both the engulfing flame and the properties of the surface. The properties of the surface may change during the exposure to the flame as it heats up and changes its surface properties. At some point the object inside the flame will reach a thermal equilibrium with the flame where the net flow of energy into the object is balanced by the energy emitted from the object. The heat flux for an object can be calculated as incident heat flux, emitted heat flux or net heat flux. A definition of heat flux needs to include parameters of the receiving object. These variations give a lot of degrees of freedom when calculating heat flux in a fire. Special water cooled gauges are designed to measure heat flux to a cooled surface, but these have proved to be very unreliable when placed inside a large fire. A more robust and easily defined method is to measure the equilibrium temperature inside an object placed inside the flame. This is the principle used in plate thermocouples used in fire resistance furnace testing [3]. In our experience, these plate thermocouples are often damaged during high heat flux jet fire tests. This raises questions to how long into the tests such measurements are reliable. Several other types of objects have been tested and the most convenient and reliable type was found to be simply a small 8 mm steel tube that is sealed in the end and has a thermocouple inside. One key difference between this small tube thermocouple and the plate thermocouple is that the plate thermocouple is directional and the tube is omnidirectional. Current works and tests will optimize the measuring objects in order to get the most relevant equilibrium temperature while still maintaining the robustness of the sensor during the test. The suggested heat flux calculation is to follow the Stefan-Boltzmann relation of temperature and heat flux. For a black body this gives 350 kW/m2 for 1303 °C and 250 kW/m2 for 1176 °C. A lower emissivity may be defined for the surface of the sensing object giving higher temperatures for the same flux levels. This method gives a simple, robust and reproducible correlation between heat flux levels and temperatures that can be measured during jet fire tests. The method does not differ between the varying convective and radiative heat transfer in the flame, but it is a representative measurement for the temperature that an object would reach when placed inside the flame.

  • 8.
    Stolen, Reidar
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Fjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Glansberg, Karin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Daaland Wormdahl, Espen
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Heat flux in jet fires : Unified method for measuring the heat flux levels of jet fires2018In: Nordic Fire and Safety Days (NFSD2018) Conference proceedings (with peer-review),, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Passive fire protection materials are used to protect critical structures against the heat from fires. In process plants with pressurized combustible substances there may be a risk of jet fires. Through risk analysis the severity of these jet fires is determined and these result in fire resistance requirements with different heat flux levels for different segments. The relevant test standard for fire resistance against jet fires does not include any measurements or definitions of the heat flux in the test flame which the tested object is exposed to. This paper presents methods for reaching different heat flux levels and how to measure them in a jet fire with limited deviations from the established jet fire test standard.

  • 9.
    Stolen, Reidar
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Fjellgaard Mikalsen, Ragni
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Stensaas, Reidar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Solcelleteknologi og brannsikkerhet2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of photovoltaic (PV) technology in Norway is increasing. In this study, fire safety challenges of PV technology are studied. Fire ignition, fire spread and fire extinguishing are investigated. The study forms a knowledge base for safeguarding fire safety during assembly, operation and during firefighting efforts, and to form unified and clear regulations. The results show:

    Fire ignition: PV installations contain many electric connections which can be potential ignition sources, as well as a small volume of combustible materials. These provide everything needed to initiate a fire. It is important that all connections in a PV installation are robust and can withstand the stress they are exposed to throughout their lifetime, without causing malfunction that could cause a fire.

    Fire spread: For building attached photovoltaics, there are cavities between the module and the building. If there is a fire in this cavity, the produced heat could be trapped, which could lead to a more rapid and extensive fire spread than if the building surface were uncovered. In large scale tests with PV modules mounted on a roof covering, the fire spread under the whole area covered with modules, but stopped when approaching the edge. This demonstrates the importance of sectioning when mounting PV installations, to avoid fire spread to the whole roof. An option is to use materials with limited combustibility as roof covering below the PV module, to withstand the increased heat exposure from the PV modules. The cavity between module and building could potentially also alter the air flow along the building, which in turn could affect the fire spread.

    Firefighting: Firefighters need information on whether there is a PV installation in the building, and where there are electrical components. During firefighting efforts, the fire service must consider the danger of direct contact, and danger of arcs and other faults that could lead to new ignition points. Fresh water can be used as an extinguishing agent. This must be applied from at least 1 meter distance with spread beam and at least 5 meters distance with a focused beam. PV modules can complicate fire extinguishing as they represent a physical barrier between the fire fighter and the area to extinguish, and by creating areas which should be avoided due to danger of components with voltage. When these points are considered, building attached photovoltaics should not be a problem.

    Further work: For building attached photovoltaics, there is little research on vertical mounting (on facades), and on how changed fire dynamics could affect fire spread and extinguishing. Also, today there is an increasing use of building integrated photovoltaics, which could potentially give many new challenges for fire safety and for regulations, as these are a part of the building and at the same time electrical components. German statistics indicate that there is an increased fire risk for these types of installations, compared to building attached photovoltaics, making this an important focus area for further work.

  • 10.
    Storesund, Karolina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Steen-Hansen, Anne
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Bøe, Andreas G.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Stolen, Reidar
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire Research Norway.
    Gjøsund, Gudveig
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Halvorsen, Kristin
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Almklov, Petter G.
    NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Rett tiltak på rett sted: Forebyggende og målrettede tekniske og organisatoriske tiltak mot dødsbranner i risikogrupper2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Personer som på ulike måter kan kategoriseres som sårbare, er overrepresentert i dødsbrannstatistikken. Derfor er det viktig å finne fram til effektive og målrettede tiltak som kan forhindre framtidige dødsbranner der personer som tilhører det som omtales som sårbare grupper er involvert. I rapporten brukes en helhetlig analytisk tilnærming som skal fange opp mangfoldet av dimensjoner som kan påvirke forebygging av dødsbrann, og hvordan disse virker i samspill med hverandre. Prosjektet har operert med en forståelse av sårbarhet som inkluderer både det fysiske miljøet, de menneskelige behovene og de sosiale og organisatoriske omgivelsene. En del av rapporten retter seg mot tekniske løsninger som kan brukes for å forbedre brannsikkerheten til sårbare grupper. Det har vært et mål å finne ut hvordan organisatoriske og tekniske tiltak kan brukes og ses i sammenheng, og hvordan tekniske tiltak kan implementeres, vurderes og dokumenteres.

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