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  • 1.
    Balaam, Madeline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Clarke, Rachel E
    Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design2019In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience Centred Design (ECD) implores us to develop empathic relationships and understanding of participants, to actively work with our senses and emotions within the design process. However, theories of experience-centred design do little to account for emotion work undertaken by design researchers when doing this. As a consequence, how a design researcher’s emotions are experienced, navigated and used as part of an ECD process are rarely published. So, while emotion is clearly a tool that we use, we don’t share with one another how, why and when it gets used. This has a limiting effect on how we understand design processes, and opportunities for training. Here, we share some of our experiences of working with ECD. We analyse these using Hochschild’s framework of emotion work to show how and where this work occurs. We use our analysis to question current ECD practices and provoke debate.

  • 2. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Nigay, Laurance
    Spaces of Interaction2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world becomes increasingly computationally enabled, so our view of human-computer interaction (HCI) needs to evolve. The proliferation of wireless connectivity and mobile devices in all their various forms moves people from being outside a computer and interacting with it to being inside an information space and moving through it. Sensors on the body, wearable computers, wireless sensor networks, increasingly believable virtual characters and speech-based systems are all contributing to new interactive environments. New forms of interaction such as gesture and touch are rapidly emerging and interactions involving emotion and a real sense of presence are beginning. These are the new spaces of interaction we need to understand, design and engineer. Most importantly these new forms of interaction are fundamentally embodied. Older views of a disembodied cognition need to be replaced with an understanding of how people with bodies live in and move through spaces of interaction.

  • 3.
    Brown, Carl
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Gustavsson, Rune
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Lindewall, Per
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Final report on interactive route guidance 1988-19911991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we present the more important research contributions made in the Interactive Route Guidance (IRG) project* carried out at SICS Knowledge Based Systems Laboratory. The emphasis has been to look at those issues which affect acceptability of the IRG system both from the driver's and society's point of view. These contributions include : - a hierarchical representation of maps. - a heuristic search algorithm for route-finding in a hierarchical space. - a description of navigator stereotypes which may be implemented as user models in a navigational system. - principles for description of routes to the resident-navigator. - a methodology for the description of dynamic information that may affect traffic and route planning. - an algorithm which tailors planned routes to constraints and considers dynamic information in the planning. - a methodology for the presentation of route changes. - a system architecture for the integration of the route planning mechanism with the mechanisms for planning and presenting routes suitable for human stereotypes. - a system architecture for the integration of in-car information systems.

  • 4.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Demo: playing fantasyA with SenToy2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a way of controlling the emotional states of a synthetic character in a game (FantasyA) through a tangible interface named SenToy. SenToy is a doll with sensors in the arms, legs and body, allowing the user to influence the emotions of her character in the game. The user performs gestures and movements with SenToy, which are picked up by the sensors and interpreted according to a scheme found through an initial Wizard of Oz study. Different gestures are used to express each of the following emotions: anger, fear, happiness, surprise, sadness and gloating. Depending upon the expressed emotion, the synthetic character in FantasyA will, in turn, perform different actions. The evaluation of SenToy acting as the interface to the computer game FantasyA has shown that users were able to express most of the desired emotions to influence the synthetic characters, and that overall, players, especially children, really liked the doll as an interface.

  • 5.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    SenToy: a tangible interface to control the emotions of a synthetic character2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assuming that learning is done best as a collaboration activity, better technical support for communication should be in place. Today's communication support for netlearning is in most cases asynchronous. Support for audio and video for synchronous communication will make it possible to collaborate more natural as in face-to-face meetings. Adding possibilities for an electronic shared workspace will amplify this collaboration to get it, in some cases, even better than face-to-face meetings. One problem with this is that people are not aware of the technological tools that exist today. Another problem is that people also might have tried synchronous communication in earlier days, where neither network, nor computers were powerful enough, which gave poor performance and a bad experience with echoing audio and blocky video with very few frames/s.This is not the case today. By making people aware of that and by making them try and use the different technologies they will get trust in use of the technology and be able to develop methodologies that utilise the technology in a pedagogic way (http://www.meetings.sunet.se/). By making people use net-based meetings as a natural way for communication new possibilities opens for netlearning.

  • 6.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Towards tangibility in gameplay: building a tangible affective interface for a computer game2003In: ICMI '03 Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Multimodal interfaces, 2003, 2, , p. 8p. 60-67Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game development is an emerging area of development for new types of interaction between computers and humans. New forms of communication are now being explored there, influenced not only by face to face communication but also by recent developments in multi-modal communication and tangible interfaces. This demo will feature a computer game, FantasyA, where users can play the game by interacting with a tangible interface, SenToy (see Figure 1). The main idea is to involve objects and artifacts from real life into ways to interact with systems, and in particular with games. So, SenToy is an interface for users to project some of their emotional gestures through moving the doll in certain ways. This device would establish a link between the users (holding the physical device) and a controlled avatar (embodied by that physical device) of the computer game, FantasyA.

  • 7.
    Bylund, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Pommeranz, Alina
    Pieces of identity2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the motivation, design, and deployment of the Pieces of Identity system. Two goals motivated the system: to provoke a discussion concerning the relationship between privacy and mobile information technology during an inauguration event of a mobile technology research center, and to stir reactions contributing to the widening of the design space of privacy and information and communication technology (ICT). The results contrasts the two well-established preconceptions about privacy that nothing is private anymore and that personal information is best locked away.

  • 8. Chalmers, Matthew
    et al.
    Dieberger, Andreas
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Social Navigation and Seamful Design2004In: Cognitive Studies: Bulletin of the Japanese Cognitive Science Society, Vol. 11, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Cockton, Gilbert
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Sch Design, Commun Design, Squires Bldg, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kaye, Jofish
    Mozilla, 331 E Evelyn Ave, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Box 513, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wynn, Eleanor
    6311 Palomino Way, West Linn, OR 97068 USA..
    Williamson, Julie
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Comp Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks2019In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a scholarly field, the ACM SIGCHI community maintains a strong focus on conferences as its main outlet for scholarly publication. Historically, this originates in how the field of computer science adopted a conference-centric publication model as well as in the organizational focus of ACM. Lately, this model has become increasingly challenged for a number of reasons, and multiple alternatives are emerging within the SIGCHI community as well as in adjacent communities. Through revisiting examples from other conferences and neighboring communities, this panel explores alternative publication paths and their opportunities and risks.

  • 10. Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Spatial cognition in the mind and in the world - the case of hypermedia navigation1996In: Proceedings of The Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Sciences Society, 1996, 7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Dourish, Paul
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Resnick, Paul
    Wexelblat, Alan
    Social navigation: techniques for building more usable systems2000In: ACM interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. 7, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Increasing awareness of browsing and editing activities in a virtual web community1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Trichon, Vincent
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Dancing with Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions through Intercorporeality2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY USA, 2019, p. 617:1-617:12Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Designing gestures for affective input: an analysis of shape, effort and valence2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss a user-centered approach to incorporating affective expressions in interactive applications, and argue for a design that addresses both body and mind. In particular, we have studied the problem of finding a set of affective gestures. Based on previous work in movement analysis and emotion theory [Davies, Laban and Lawrence, Russell], and a study of an actor expressing emotional states in body movements, we have identified three underlying dimensions of movements and emotions: shape, effort and valence. From these dimensions we have created a new affective interaction model, which we name the affective gestural plane model. We applied this model to the design of gestural affective input to a mobile service for affective messages.

  • 15. Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Emotionally Engaging Interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    eMoto: emotionally engaging interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 377-381Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holopainen, Jussi
    Nokia Research.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ivarsson, Katarina
    Boris Design Studio.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio.
    Lindley, Siân
    Microsoft Research.
    Norlin, Cristian
    Ericsson Research.
    Plei-Plei!2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Let us introduce an amazing crowd of researchers at Mobile Life Centre in Stockholm, Sweden, and some of their friends at Nokia Research Center, Microsoft Research Cambridge and Ericsson Research. These people are at the international forefront of research in the domain of mobile interactive technology – a situation that this book aims to celebrate!

    This is also a printed book, which means it may work a bit like a time capsule, showcasing a set of explorations that may appear peculiar and out-dated, depending on when you happen to read it. It may therefore be highlighted that all the work presented in here was conducted during the first five years of the Mobile Life Centre (2007-2012) — a time when the mobile mass market, as well as research in this field, was still new, fresh and explorative in nature.

    The title, Plei-Plei, refers to a playful approach towards research as characteristic in the work presented in this book. The term is also used by natives in the pacific islands of Vanuatu, to describe “mere play” in their everyday lives, as well as in their use of mobile phones. This means that the book is not just about fun and games, but rather an attempt to capture how research can be driven by a genuine curiosity of, and inspiration from, what people enjoy doing.

    Since many of our friends have told us that research papers are usually too long and also somewhat boring to read, we have chosen to present this work by highlighting some of our favourite results with illustrations and shorter texts that hopefully will be more inspirational and enjoyable to read. Thanks to massive help from Boris Design Studio, we are immensely impressed with the result that is now in your hand.

    Please Enjoy!

  • 18.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, SICS.
    Designing for Joyful Movement2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer , 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

  • 19.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, p. 653-666Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process.

  • 20.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Appreciating plei-plei around mobiles: playfulness in Rah island2012In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems(CHI '12) / [ed] ACM, New York, NY, USA, ACM Press, 2012, p. 2015-2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to explore and understand the ways in which mobiles made their way into an environment--Rah Island in Vanuatu--for the first time. We were struck by their playful use, especially given the very limited infrastructure and inexpensive devices that were available. Based on our findings, we discuss tensions between playfulness and utility, in particular relating to socio-economic benefits, and conclude that playfulness in these settings needs to be taken as seriously as in any other setting. Additionally, we formulated three challenges when designing for play in similar settings: (1) engage intimately with the materials of inexpensive ICT; (2) revisit design recommendations for playfulness to ensure that they can travel/translate into other cultures; and (3) alleviate existing tensions.

  • 21.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons learnt in Vanuatu2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobile phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us - they have become habits, deeply ingrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mobile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetic practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

  • 22.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons Learnt in Vanuatu2011In: Proocedings of CHI'11, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobiles phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us – they have become habits, deeply engrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mo-bile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetics practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

  • 23. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Case for Play in the Developing World: Lessons from Rah Island, Vanuatu2015In: Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies / [ed] Laurel Evelyn Dyson, Stephen Grant, Max Hendriks, Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 25. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    Höök, Kristina
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008In: NordiCHI '08: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges, 2008, p. 123-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 26. Fitzpatrick, G.
    et al.
    Friedman, B.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olson, J. S.
    Russell, D. M.
    Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel06Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous reports and studies point to increasing performance criteria and workplace stress for academics/researchers. Together with the audience, this panel will explore how we experience this in the HCI community, focussing particularly on what we can do to change this for a slower more sustainable academic culture. The future of good quality HCI research is dependent on happy healthy researchers and reasonable realistic academic processes.

  • 27. Forsberg, Mattias
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Design Principals of Social Navigation1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Gaver, Bill
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    In Search of the Elusive CHI Design Paper2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Gaver, W.
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    What makes a good CHI design paper?2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 20-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hammarström, Kent Saxin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Ereback, Anna-Lena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Convene - MUD interfaces for disabled users1999In: Users in Action: Stories of Users and Telematics in Everyday Life, Stockholm, Sweden: Kommunikationsforskningsberedningen (KFB) , 1999, 1, , p. 195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31. Helmes, John
    et al.
    Taylor, Alex
    Cao, Xiang
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Schmitt, Peter
    Villar, Nicolas
    Rudiments 1, 2 & 3: design speculations on autonomy2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the design process and installation of three speculative, rudimentary machines, or rudiments. Through careful iterations in their design, the rudiments are intended to provoke curiosity and discussion around the possibility of autonomy in interactive systems. The design of the rudiments is described in detail, alongside the design decisions that were made to suggest a machine autonomy and to provoke discussion. Some preliminary reflections from installing the rudiments in two separate households are also reported. Widely divergent opinions of the rudiments from the two households are used to discuss a number of themes for thinking about autonomy and interactive systems design. Overall, the presented work adopts a perspective strongly oriented towards guiding future research, but, importantly, aims to do so by opening up and exposing the design possibilities rather than constraining them.

  • 32.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, ICT, SICS.
    Mobile Life: A Research Foundation for Mobile Services2007In: Proceedings of the 6th Global Mobility Roundtable, 2007, 1, , p. 11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The telecom and IT industry is now facing the challenge of a second IT-revolution, where the spread of mobile and ubiquitous services will have an even more profound effect on commercial and social life than the recent Internet revolution. Users will expect services that are unique and fully adapted for the mobile setting, which means that the roles of the operators will change, new business models will be required, and new methods for developing and marketing services have to be found. Most of all, we need technology and services that put people at core. The industry must prepare to design services for a sustainable web of work, leisure and ubiquitous technology we can call the mobile life. In this paper, we describe the main components of a research agenda for mobile services, which is carried out at the Mobile Life Center at Stockholm University. This research program takes a sustainable approach to research and development of mobile and ubiquitous services, by combining a strong theoretical foundation (embodied interaction), a welldefined methodology (user-centered design) and an important domain with large societal importance and commercial potential (mobile life). Eventually the center will create an experimental mobile services ecosystem, which will serve as an open arena where partners from academia and industry can develop our vision an abundant future marketplace for future mobile servíces.

  • 33.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    A cry for more tech at CHI!2012In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This is a rant. And a plea. And an ad. With this rant, plea, and ad, I hope to attract more attention to the video and interactivity submissions at CHI 2012. But that is just a means to an end. The result I hope for is to make our field influential in shaping a whole new wave of interactions through technologies, the likes of which we have never seen before.

  • 34.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Adaption to the User's Task1995Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adapting explanations to users with varying background knowledge and abilities is a difficult task: the explanation content, style, amount of details, terms used, etc. may be affected in various ways. We have used our analysis of the information seeking tasks of the users in one particular domain as a basis for adaptation. We structured the domain information into a set of information entities where each entity describes one aspect of a node in the information space. Each information entity is fitted to one or several information seeking tasks, and by combining entities we create an explanation adapted to the user's current task. We do not avoid concepts which are unknown to the user in our information entities. Instead we allow the users to ask follow-up questions on those concepts in order to cater the users' differences in background knowledge. Which follow-up questions are available also depends on the users' current task. Finally, we emphasise the need to make the difference between the adapted explanations obvious to the user. Only then can the users predict which explanations best fit their need and thereby control the self-adaptive mechanisms of the system. So, our system is adaptive to the information seeking task of the user, while the user's knowledge, abilities and roles, are catered for by other means.

  • 35.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Affect and experiential approaches2013In: The SAGE Handbook of Digital Technology Research, Sage Publications, 2013, p. 174-188Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Affective Computing2012In: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis, Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation , 2012, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design moved from designing and evaluating work-oriented applications towards dealing with leisure-oriented applications, such as games, social computing, art, and tools for creativity, we have had to consider e.g. what constitutes an experience, how to deal with users’emotions, and understanding aesthetic practices and experiences. Here I will provide a short account of why in particular emotion became one such important strand of work in our field.

  • 37.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment2009In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 364, p. 3585-3595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced inseparable from all other aspects of everyday life. Emotion processes are part of our social ways of being in the world; they dye our dreams, hopes and bodily experiences of the world. If we aim to design for affective interaction experiences, we need to place them into this larger picture.

  • 38.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Affective Loop Experiences: Designing for Interactional Embodiment2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives.

  • 39.
    Höök, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet.
    Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment2009In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 364, no 1535, p. 3585-3595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced inseparable from all other aspects of everyday life. Emotion processes are part of our social ways of being in the world; they dye our dreams, hopes and bodily experiences of the world. If we aim to design for affective interaction experiences, we need to place them into this larger picture. 

  • 40.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Commentary on: Shusterman, Richard (2013): Somaesthetics2012In: In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/somaesthetics.htmlArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In designing for bodily experiences, there has been a lack of theories that can provide the underpinnings we need to understand and deepen our design thinking. Despite all the work we have seen on designing for embodiment (Dourish, 2004, and others), the actual corporeal, pulsating, live, felt body has been notably absent from both theory and practical work. At the same time, digital products have become an integral part of the fabric of everyday life, the pleasures (and pains) they give, their contribution to our social identity, or their general aesthetics are now core features of their design. We see more and more attempts to design explicitly for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task.  With the advent of new technologies, such as biosensors worn on your body, interactive clothes, or wearable computers such as mobiles equipped with accelerometers, a whole space of possibilities for gesture-based, physical and body-based interaction is opened.

    Some claim that the technologies we wear today treat our bodies in a negative way:

    “Electronics, robotics, and spintronics invade and transform the body and, as a consequence of this, the body becomes an object and loses its remaining personal characteristics, those characteristics that might make us consider it as the sacred guardian of our identity.”-- Longo, 2003 

    How can we do a better job in interaction design involving our bodies — the sacred guardians of our identity? This is where I think Shusterman’s theories of somaesthetics are relevant.

  • 41.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Designing and evaluating intelligent user interfaces1999In: IUI '99: Proceedings of the 1999 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, 5-8 Jan 1999, Redondo Beach, Los Angeles, California, USA, 1999, 1Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Designing Familiar Open Surfaces2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While participatory design makes end-users part of the design process, we might also want the resulting system to be open for interpretation, appropriation and change over time to reflect its usage. But how can we design for appropriation? We need to strike a good balance between making the user an active co-constructor of system functionality versus making a too strong, interpretative design that does it all for the user thereby inhibiting their own creative use of the system. Through revisiting five systems in which appropriation has happened both within and outside the intended use, we are going to show how it can be possible to design with open surfaces. These open surfaces have to be such that users can fill them with their own interpretation and content, they should be familiar to the user, resonating with their real world practice and understanding, thereby shaping its use.

  • 43.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing with the Body: Somaesthetic Interaction Design2018Book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Digitaliseringen av det Vardagliga2015In: Om Sverige i framtiden – en antologi om digitaliseringens möjligheter (SOU 2015:65), Statens offentliga utredningar (SOU) , 2015, p. 165-194Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Alltfler saker och  interaktioner är uppkopplade på Internet i det vi kallar sakernas internet. Det sägs att 50 miljarder enheter kommer vara uppkopplande på Internet år 2020[1]. Redan i dag har vi kopplat upp många miljarder enheter. Alla våra mobiler är uppkopplade. Snart kommer våra bilar att vara uppkopplade. Elmätarna i våra hus är uppkopplade. Alla våra spelkonsoler är uppkopplade. Alla enheter i en fabrik, inklusive verktyg, kommer att vara uppkopplade så att vi alltid vet var och i vilket tillstånd saker befinner sig. Posten följer alla paket genom transportsystemet. Sensorer läser av vattenkvaliteten på våra badplatser. Alla parkeringsplatser i en stad är uppkopplade. Bullernivån på de stora gatorna i Stockholm mäts. Vi vet till och med hur mycket choklad, läsk och chips som finns i automaten på pendeltågs­stationen och kan fylla på när det behövs.

    Vad betyder det här för vår samhällsutveckling och vilka politiska beslut kommer vi behöva fatta? Att svara på den frågan är lite som att i slutet på 1800-talet försöka svara på frågan om vad elektriciteten kommer betyda för våra liv. Samtidigt vet vi ju att teknikutvecklingen inte är deterministisk. Den formas av oss och vi formas av den. Vi måste försöka överblicka vad den tekniska utvecklingen möjliggör och hur vi på bästa sätt implementerar den som en del i vårt samhälle för att kunna forma den till att bygga det samhälle vi vill ha.

    Jag har valt att spegla utvecklingen från ett vardagligt perspektiv snarare än hur den förändrar industrier eller våra yrkesliv (vilket behandlas av andra författare i den här antologin). Vi ser redan idag hur den digitala tekniken blir en naturlig del i vår vardag. Den kommer in i våra hem och bilar, ut i våra trädgårdar, på sommarstugor, ut i skogen och på våra vägar. Den hamnar också kring, på eller till och med inuti våra kroppar. Det allra mest intima får en digital skugga. Den digitala tekniken är inte längre okroppslig – åtkomlig endast genom att gå in i den digitala världen online – utan istället både kroppslig, aktiv och intim.

    Digitaliseringen av det vardagliga kan komma att professionalisera, effektivisera, kontrollera och medialisera vår vardag. Organisationen av stat, kommuner och landsting kommer att utmanas och förändras. En uppsjö företag kommer erbjuda tjänster och interaktiva artefakter som styr, och när det går, automatiserar våra hem och städer. Tekniken kommer spegla oss och skapa berättelser om våra kroppar, våra trädgårdar, våra hem, våra apparater, våra fritidstillämpningar – en sorts medialisering av verkligheten. Det kommer också finnas verktyg och teknik som låter oss vara kreativa och skapa våra egna lösningar, våra egna identiteter, i det som kallas maker-rörelsen.

    Digitaliseringen av det vardagliga möjliggör en fantastisk utveckling, med miljövänliga och effektiva lösningar, men den kräver att vi funderar över vilka värderingar som ska styra och vilken samhällsutveckling vi vill ha. Tekniken möjliggör flera olika politiska agendor. Vi kan välja att låta professionella få exklusiv makt över utformningen av de digitala lösningarna eller göra det till en bred folkrörelse i skola och samhälle. Vi kan välja att ta de digitala materialen i bruk för genomgripande förändringar mot ett mer hållbart samhälle, en delandets ekonomi där vi inte äger fysiska prylar, som bilar, cyklar eller gräsklippare, utan istället delar dem via digitala tjänster. Vi kan låta många kulturella former få sina digitala uttryck, skapa en mångfald av upplevelser och interaktioner i vår vardag. Eller vi kan välja att övervaka befolkningen, förtrycka och förfölja.

  • 45.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Evaluating affective interaction2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Evaluating interactive characters going beyond body language2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Knowing, Communicating and Experiencing through Body and Emotion2008In: IEEE Transactions on Learning technologies, Vol. 1, p. 248-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With new technologies such as body sensors, tangible interaction, haptics, interactive cloth, or small computing devices such as mobiles, we can move interaction from the desktop out into the world and onto our bodies. Likewise, with the boom of computer games, domestic digital technology use, and social communication tools, we have to consider designing for non-instrumental goals, beyond task completion. This has been picked up by human-computer interaction researchers in the so-called third wave of HCI. We suggest that learning technologies could use some of the results from the third wave of HCI, placing body and emotion more centrally into the communication and construction of knowledge. Designing for bodily interaction, emotional communication or aesthetics is not trivial. In design work, a designer can only set the stage for certain experience to happen, but in the end, it is the user who co-constructs the experience with or through the interaction. Based on our experiences of designing for bodily and emotional communication, we will posit three postulates that might be helpful in designing for involving interaction: leaving ‘surfaces’ open for users to appropriate, building for users to recognise themselves socially, emotional or bodily through the interface, and avoiding reductionism.

  • 48.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Mobile Life – innovation in the wild2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a decade of work in our research labs on mobile and ubiquitous technology, often formed by the early visions of ubiquitous computing, with the urge to move interaction from the desktop out into the wild, these technologies have now moved out into the world – into the wild. We are in the middle of a second IT-revolution, caused by the spread of mobile and ubiquitous services, in combination with a broad consumer-oriented market pull. The first IT-revolution, the introduction and deployment of Internet and the World Wide Web during the 1990’s, had a major impact on all parts of our society. As mobile, ubiquitous technology now becomes wide-spread, the design and evaluation of mobile services – i.e. information technology that can be accessed and used in virtually any setting – represents an important business arena for the IT- and telecom industry. Together we have to look for a sustainable web of work, leisure and ubiquitous technology we can call the mobile life. But what impact does this have on HCI research? In particular, what is our role in innovating new services, new technologies, new interaction models and new ways of living with this technology? Obviously, new methods for design and evaluation of interfaces are needed, especially when those interfaces are not always clearly ‘interfaces’ anymore, but blend in with various new materials in our environments or even worn on our bodies. Usage situations are shifting, unstable, mobile settings – interaction in the wild. There is a need for design methods that help structure a multitude of different sources of inspiration and fieldwork, and synthesize it into concrete requirements and service or technology concepts. In our work we have used a variety of such methods, such as ethnography as a basis for design, Laban-notation to analyse body behaviours, novel forms of quick sketching of mobile service interaction, cultural probes to understand emotional processes in people’s everyday lives, bodystorming for situating ideas in the real world, and the experience clip method for user self-evaluation to evaluate mobile services in their realistic setting. We have also developed our own methods, such as e.g. user-driven innovation - studying extreme or specialised user groups and then innovating services for other user groups based on those experiences But we also see trends that will turn these ways of approaching innovation upside down. Producers and consumers blend together in what we name Mobile 2.0-services, creating content dependent on the mobile setting. Sketching in hardware and software combinations becomes accessible not only to technology experts, but to all. How can HCI-practice change to make the ‘digital materials’ accessible to all rather than supporting only HCI-experts to develop innovative design? As pointed out in the vision “Being Human: Human-Computer Interaction in the year 2020”, HCI needs to orient towards the values shaped by the interaction between technology and people in our everyday lives. As digital, interactive technology enters every aspect of our lives we must do justice to the full complexity of actual human lived experience, where people actively and individually construct meaningful experiences around technology. We might even have to take responsibility for how society is shaped by this second digital revolution - making values such as privacy, autonomy or trust, but also living a good, rich life, explicitly part of our design processes and study methods, creating for a sustainable, human-friendly society. In the Mobile Life centre, we work around a vision of a ludic society where work mixes with leisure, private with public – a society where enjoyment, experience and play are adopted into all aspects of life. It becomes important to recognise that private and leisure life should not have to be as polished and efficient as your work performance when practices and technology travel between these spheres of our life. In my talk, I will discuss the implications for academic research in HCI as well as how this fosters a novel work practice in industry. The ICT and telecom industry will be less focused on identifying needs and more focused on values, in particular, ludic aspects of life.

  • 49.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Move that Body! Involving users emotionally, bodily and socially2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Our approach to social computing2001In: ERCIM News, no 46Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    How can we empower people to find, choose between, and make use of the multitude of computer-, net-based- and embedded services that surround us? How can we turn human-computer interaction into a more social experience? How can we design for dynamic change of system functionality based on how the systems are used? Tackling these issues is the core of the work in the HUMLE laboratory, and our solutions are inspired by observing that much of the information seeking in everyday life is performed through watching, following, and talking to other people — what we name social computing.

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