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  • 1.
    Alfaras, Miquel
    et al.
    PLUX Wireless Biosignals, Ave 5 Outubro 70, P-1050059 Lisbon, Portugal.;Univ Jaume 1, Dept Engn & Ciencia Comp, RobInLab, Avinguda Vicent Sos Baynat S-N, Castellon de La Plana 12071, Spain..
    Primett, William
    PLUX Wireless Biosignals, Ave 5 Outubro 70, P-1050059 Lisbon, Portugal.;UNL Univ NOVA Lisboa, Dept Fis, LIBPhys FCT, P-2825149 Caparica, Portugal..
    Umair, Muhammad
    Univ Lancaster, Comp & Commun Dept, InfoLab21, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Chalabianloo, Niaz
    Bogazici Univ, Comp Engn Dept, TR-34470 Sariyer, Turkey..
    Bowie, Dionne
    Univ Lancaster, Comp & Commun Dept, InfoLab21, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England.;Leeds Teaching Hosp NHS Trust, Res & Innovat Ctr, Beckett St, Leeds LS9 7TF, W Yorkshire, England..
    Sas, Corina
    Univ Lancaster, Comp & Commun Dept, InfoLab21, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ersoy, Cem
    Bogazici Univ, Comp Engn Dept, TR-34470 Sariyer, Turkey..
    Gamboa, Hugo
    UNL Univ NOVA Lisboa, Dept Fis, LIBPhys FCT, P-2825149 Caparica, Portugal..
    Biosensing and Actuation-Platforms Coupling Body Input-Output Modalities for Affective Technologies2020In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 20, no 21, article id 5968Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research in the use of ubiquitous technologies, tracking systems and wearables within mental health domains is on the rise. In recent years, affective technologies have gained traction and garnered the interest of interdisciplinary fields as the research on such technologies matured. However, while the role of movement and bodily experience to affective experience is well-established, how to best address movement and engagement beyond measuring cues and signals in technology-driven interactions has been unclear. In a joint industry-academia effort, we aim to remodel how affective technologies can help address body and emotional self-awareness. We present an overview of biosignals that have become standard in low-cost physiological monitoring and show how these can be matched with methods and engagements used by interaction designers skilled in designing for bodily engagement and aesthetic experiences. Taking both strands of work together offers unprecedented design opportunities that inspire further research. Through first-person soma design, an approach that draws upon the designer's felt experience and puts the sentient body at the forefront, we outline a comprehensive work for the creation of novel interactions in the form of couplings that combine biosensing and body feedback modalities of relevance to affective health. These couplings lie within the creation of design toolkits that have the potential to render rich embodied interactions to the designer/user. As a result we introduce the concept of "orchestration". By orchestration, we refer to the design of the overall interaction: coupling sensors to actuation of relevance to the affective experience; initiating and closing the interaction; habituating; helping improve on the users' body awareness and engagement with emotional experiences; soothing, calming, or energising, depending on the affective health condition and the intentions of the designer. Through the creation of a range of prototypes and couplings we elicited requirements on broader orchestration mechanisms. First-person soma design lets researchers look afresh at biosignals that, when experienced through the body, are called to reshape affective technologies with novel ways to interpret biodata, feel it, understand it and reflect upon our bodies.

  • 2. Alfaras, Miquel
    et al.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Umair, Muhammad
    Lancaster University.
    Sas, Corina
    Lancaster University.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From Biodata to Somadata2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biosensing technologies are increasingly available as off-the-shelf products, yet for many designers, artists and non-engineers, these technologies remain difficult to design with. Through a soma design stance, we devised a novel approach for exploring qualities in biodata. Our explorative process culminated in the design of three artefacts, coupling biosignals to tangible actuation formats. By making biodata perceivable as sound, in tangible form or directly on the skin, it became possible to link qualities of the measurements to our own somatics - our felt experience of our bodily bioprocesses - as they dynamically unfold, spurring somatically-grounded design discoveries of novel possible interactions. We show that making biodata attainable for a felt experience - or as we frame it: turning biodata into somadata - enables not only first-person encounters, but also supports collaborative design processes as the somadata can be shared and experienced dynamically, right at the moment when we explore design ideas.

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  • 3. Avila, J. M.
    et al.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Valenti, Niclas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    McPherson, A.
    Benford, S.
    Soma design for nime2020In: Proceedings of the International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression, International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression , 2020, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on musical embodiment has reported that expert performers often regard their instruments as an extension of their body. Not every digital musical instrument seeks to create a close relationship between body and instrument, but even for the many that do, the design process often focuses heavily on technical and sonic factors, with relatively less attention to the bodily experience of the performer. In this paper we propose soma design as an alternative approach to explore this space. Soma method aims to attune the sensibilities of designers, as well as their experience of their body, and make use of these notions as a resource for creative aesthetic design. We report on a series of workshops exploring the relationship between the body and the guitar with a soma design approach. The workshops resulted in a series of guitar-related artefacts and NIMEs that emerged from the somatic exploration of balance and tension during guitar performance. Lastly we present lessons learned from our research that could inform future Soma-based musical instrument design, and how NIME research may also inform soma design. 

  • 4.
    Balaam, Madeline
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Clarke, Rachel E
    Northumbria University Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    TU Wien, Vienna, Austria.
    Emotion Work in Experience-Centred Design2019In: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Proceedings (CHI 2019), May 4–9, 2019, Glasgow, Scotland UK, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience Centred Design (ECD) implores us to develop empathic relationships and understanding of participants, to actively work with our senses and emotions within the design process. However, theories of experience-centred design do little to account for emotion work undertaken by design researchers when doing this. As a consequence, how a design researcher’s emotions are experienced, navigated and used as part of an ECD process are rarely published. So, while emotion is clearly a tool that we use, we don’t share with one another how, why and when it gets used. This has a limiting effect on how we understand design processes, and opportunities for training. Here, we share some of our experiences of working with ECD. We analyse these using Hochschild’s framework of emotion work to show how and where this work occurs. We use our analysis to question current ECD practices and provoke debate.

  • 5. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Nigay, Laurance
    Spaces of Interaction2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world becomes increasingly computationally enabled, so our view of human-computer interaction (HCI) needs to evolve. The proliferation of wireless connectivity and mobile devices in all their various forms moves people from being outside a computer and interacting with it to being inside an information space and moving through it. Sensors on the body, wearable computers, wireless sensor networks, increasingly believable virtual characters and speech-based systems are all contributing to new interactive environments. New forms of interaction such as gesture and touch are rapidly emerging and interactions involving emotion and a real sense of presence are beginning. These are the new spaces of interaction we need to understand, design and engineer. Most importantly these new forms of interaction are fundamentally embodied. Older views of a disembodied cognition need to be replaced with an understanding of how people with bodies live in and move through spaces of interaction.

  • 6. Brown, B.
    et al.
    Bodker, S.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Does HCI scale?: Scale hacking and the relevance of HCI2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 28-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Brown, Carl
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Gustavsson, Rune
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Lindewall, Per
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Final report on interactive route guidance 1988-19911991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we present the more important research contributions made in the Interactive Route Guidance (IRG) project* carried out at SICS Knowledge Based Systems Laboratory. The emphasis has been to look at those issues which affect acceptability of the IRG system both from the driver's and society's point of view. These contributions include : - a hierarchical representation of maps. - a heuristic search algorithm for route-finding in a hierarchical space. - a description of navigator stereotypes which may be implemented as user models in a navigational system. - principles for description of routes to the resident-navigator. - a methodology for the description of dynamic information that may affect traffic and route planning. - an algorithm which tailors planned routes to constraints and considers dynamic information in the planning. - a methodology for the presentation of route changes. - a system architecture for the integration of the route planning mechanism with the mechanisms for planning and presenting routes suitable for human stereotypes. - a system architecture for the integration of in-car information systems.

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  • 8.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Demo: playing fantasyA with SenToy2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a way of controlling the emotional states of a synthetic character in a game (FantasyA) through a tangible interface named SenToy. SenToy is a doll with sensors in the arms, legs and body, allowing the user to influence the emotions of her character in the game. The user performs gestures and movements with SenToy, which are picked up by the sensors and interpreted according to a scheme found through an initial Wizard of Oz study. Different gestures are used to express each of the following emotions: anger, fear, happiness, surprise, sadness and gloating. Depending upon the expressed emotion, the synthetic character in FantasyA will, in turn, perform different actions. The evaluation of SenToy acting as the interface to the computer game FantasyA has shown that users were able to express most of the desired emotions to influence the synthetic characters, and that overall, players, especially children, really liked the doll as an interface.

  • 9.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    SenToy: a tangible interface to control the emotions of a synthetic character2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assuming that learning is done best as a collaboration activity, better technical support for communication should be in place. Today's communication support for netlearning is in most cases asynchronous. Support for audio and video for synchronous communication will make it possible to collaborate more natural as in face-to-face meetings. Adding possibilities for an electronic shared workspace will amplify this collaboration to get it, in some cases, even better than face-to-face meetings. One problem with this is that people are not aware of the technological tools that exist today. Another problem is that people also might have tried synchronous communication in earlier days, where neither network, nor computers were powerful enough, which gave poor performance and a bad experience with echoing audio and blocky video with very few frames/s.This is not the case today. By making people aware of that and by making them try and use the different technologies they will get trust in use of the technology and be able to develop methodologies that utilise the technology in a pedagogic way (http://www.meetings.sunet.se/). By making people use net-based meetings as a natural way for communication new possibilities opens for netlearning.

  • 10.
    Bullock, Adrian
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Andersson, Gerd
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Towards tangibility in gameplay: building a tangible affective interface for a computer game2003In: ICMI '03 Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Multimodal interfaces, 2003, 2, , p. 8p. 60-67Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game development is an emerging area of development for new types of interaction between computers and humans. New forms of communication are now being explored there, influenced not only by face to face communication but also by recent developments in multi-modal communication and tangible interfaces. This demo will feature a computer game, FantasyA, where users can play the game by interacting with a tangible interface, SenToy (see Figure 1). The main idea is to involve objects and artifacts from real life into ways to interact with systems, and in particular with games. So, SenToy is an interface for users to project some of their emotional gestures through moving the doll in certain ways. This device would establish a link between the users (holding the physical device) and a controlled avatar (embodied by that physical device) of the computer game, FantasyA.

  • 11.
    Bylund, Markus
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Pommeranz, Alina
    Pieces of identity2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the motivation, design, and deployment of the Pieces of Identity system. Two goals motivated the system: to provoke a discussion concerning the relationship between privacy and mobile information technology during an inauguration event of a mobile technology research center, and to stir reactions contributing to the widening of the design space of privacy and information and communication technology (ICT). The results contrasts the two well-established preconceptions about privacy that nothing is private anymore and that personal information is best locked away.

  • 12. Chalmers, Matthew
    et al.
    Dieberger, Andreas
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Rudström, Åsa
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Decisions, Networks and Analytics lab.
    Social Navigation and Seamful Design2004In: Cognitive Studies: Bulletin of the Japanese Cognitive Science Society, Vol. 11, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Claisse, C.
    et al.
    Umair, M.
    Durrant, A. C.
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, V.
    Sanches, P.
    Sas, C.
    Tangible Interaction for SupportingWell-being2022In: 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2022, 30 April 2022 through 5 May 2022, Virtual, Online: Extended Abstracts of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2022, article id 100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our workshop aims to bring together researchers and practitioners across disciplines in HCI who share an interest in promoting well-being through tangible interaction. The workshop forms an impassioned response to the worldwide push towards more digital and remote interaction in nearly all domains of our lives in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. One question we raise is: to what extent will measures like remote interaction remain in place post-pandemic, and to what extent these changes may influence future agendas for the design of interactive products and services to support living well? We aim to ensure that the workshop serves as a space for diverse participants to share ideas and engage in cooperative discussions through hands-on activities resulting in the co-creation of a Manifesto to demonstrate the importance of embodied and sensory interaction for supporting well-being in a post-pandemic context. All the workshop materials will be published online on the workshop website and disseminated through ongoing collaboration.

  • 14.
    Cockton, Gilbert
    et al.
    Northumbria Univ, Sch Design, Commun Design, Squires Bldg, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kaye, Jofish
    Mozilla, 331 E Evelyn Ave, Mountain View, CA 94041 USA..
    Waern, Annika
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat & Media, Box 513, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wynn, Eleanor
    6311 Palomino Way, West Linn, OR 97068 USA..
    Williamson, Julie
    Univ Glasgow, Sch Comp Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland..
    Moving Towards a Journal-centric Publication Model for CHI: Possible Paths, Opportunities and Risks2019In: CHI EA '19 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: EXTENDED ABSTRACTS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a scholarly field, the ACM SIGCHI community maintains a strong focus on conferences as its main outlet for scholarly publication. Historically, this originates in how the field of computer science adopted a conference-centric publication model as well as in the organizational focus of ACM. Lately, this model has become increasingly challenged for a number of reasons, and multiple alternatives are emerging within the SIGCHI community as well as in adjacent communities. Through revisiting examples from other conferences and neighboring communities, this panel explores alternative publication paths and their opportunities and risks.

  • 15. Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Spatial cognition in the mind and in the world - the case of hypermedia navigation1996In: Proceedings of The Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Sciences Society, 1996, 7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Dourish, Paul
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Resnick, Paul
    Wexelblat, Alan
    Social navigation: techniques for building more usable systems2000In: ACM interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. 7, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Dieberger, Andreas
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Increasing awareness of browsing and editing activities in a virtual web community1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18. Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH.
    Shusterman, Richard
    Svanaes, Daf
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Ethics in Movement - Shaping and Being Shaped in Human-Drone Interaction2020In: CHI '20: Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing System, 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is ethics shaped by the particularities of a design? Through a detailed video analysis, we explore how ethicality is shaped in interaction between a choreographer, a performer and a choir of five drones, performing together on the opera stage. We pinpoint how movements enabled by the humandrone assemblage may limit or liberate artistic expressions vis-à-vis the norms of operatic performance. From a somaesthetics perspective on ethics, we show how the process of crafting rich experiences together with drones can deepen sensory appreciation skills, leading to an increased understanding of underlying somatic drivers and imposed norms. Somatic awareness thereby enables a richer repertoire of movements, expanding the ability to freely choose how to act, and cultivating empathy towards others. This shifts our understanding of ethics in HCI as solely about abstract rules or policies ‘out there’ to also concern the specifics of how technology informs or dictates movement and experience. 

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  • 19.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Trichon, Vincent
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Dancing with Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions through Intercorporeality2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2019, p. 617:1-617:12Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 20.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Designing gestures for affective input: an analysis of shape, effort and valence2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss a user-centered approach to incorporating affective expressions in interactive applications, and argue for a design that addresses both body and mind. In particular, we have studied the problem of finding a set of affective gestures. Based on previous work in movement analysis and emotion theory [Davies, Laban and Lawrence, Russell], and a study of an actor expressing emotional states in body movements, we have identified three underlying dimensions of movements and emotions: shape, effort and valence. From these dimensions we have created a new affective interaction model, which we name the affective gestural plane model. We applied this model to the design of gestural affective input to a mobile service for affective messages.

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  • 21. Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    eMoto - Emotionally Engaging Interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Fagerberg, Petra
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Ståhl, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    eMoto: emotionally engaging interaction2004In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4909, E-ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 377-381Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23. Fernaeus, Y.
    et al.
    Isbister, K.
    Höök, Kia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Laaksolahti, J.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Sundström, Petra
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Cognitive Technologies, Springer Verlag , 2011, no 9783642151835, p. 657-670Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process. 

  • 24.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Holopainen, Jussi
    Nokia Research.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ivarsson, Katarina
    Boris Design Studio.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Boris Design Studio.
    Lindley, Siân
    Microsoft Research.
    Norlin, Cristian
    Ericsson Research.
    Plei-Plei!2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Let us introduce an amazing crowd of researchers at Mobile Life Centre in Stockholm, Sweden, and some of their friends at Nokia Research Center, Microsoft Research Cambridge and Ericsson Research. These people are at the international forefront of research in the domain of mobile interactive technology – a situation that this book aims to celebrate!

    This is also a printed book, which means it may work a bit like a time capsule, showcasing a set of explorations that may appear peculiar and out-dated, depending on when you happen to read it. It may therefore be highlighted that all the work presented in here was conducted during the first five years of the Mobile Life Centre (2007-2012) — a time when the mobile mass market, as well as research in this field, was still new, fresh and explorative in nature.

    The title, Plei-Plei, refers to a playful approach towards research as characteristic in the work presented in this book. The term is also used by natives in the pacific islands of Vanuatu, to describe “mere play” in their everyday lives, as well as in their use of mobile phones. This means that the book is not just about fun and games, but rather an attempt to capture how research can be driven by a genuine curiosity of, and inspiration from, what people enjoy doing.

    Since many of our friends have told us that research papers are usually too long and also somewhat boring to read, we have chosen to present this work by highlighting some of our favourite results with illustrations and shorter texts that hopefully will be more inspirational and enjoyable to read. Thanks to massive help from Boris Design Studio, we are immensely impressed with the result that is now in your hand.

    Please Enjoy!

  • 25.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, SICS.
    Designing for Joyful Movement2018In: Funology 2: From Usability to Enjoyment / [ed] Mark Blythe and Andrew Monk, Springer , 2018, p. 193-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design research has broadened its focus from settings in which people would sit more or less still in front of static computers doing their work tasks, to instead thriving off new interactive materials, mobile use, and ubiquitously available data of all sorts, creating interactions everywhere. These changes have put into question such as play versus learning, work versus leisure, or casual versus serious technology use. As both hardware and software have become mobile—both literally and in terms of transgressing cultural categories—the different social spheres and the rules that they are associated with are changing

  • 26.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Isbister, Katherine
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS, Computer Systems Laboratory.
    Sundström, Petra
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Understanding users and their situation2011In: Emotion-Oriented Systems: The Humaine Handbook, Springer , 2011, 10, p. 653-666Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first step in any design process is to set the stage for what to design and how that should be realised. In terms of user-centred design, this includes to develop a sense of who will be using the system, where it is intended to be used, and what it should be used for. In this chapter we provide an overview of this part of the development process, and its place in the design cycle, and some orienting design challenges that are specific to affective interaction. Thereafter we present a variety of methods that designers may want to consider in actual design work. We end by providing a set of examples from previous and ongoing research in the field, which could also work as inspirations or guiding sources in the early stages in a user-centred design process.

  • 27.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Mobile Life .
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile Life .
    Appreciating plei-plei around mobiles: playfulness in Rah island2012In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems(CHI '12) / [ed] ACM, New York, NY, USA, ACM Press, 2012, p. 2015-2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to explore and understand the ways in which mobiles made their way into an environment--Rah Island in Vanuatu--for the first time. We were struck by their playful use, especially given the very limited infrastructure and inexpensive devices that were available. Based on our findings, we discuss tensions between playfulness and utility, in particular relating to socio-economic benefits, and conclude that playfulness in these settings needs to be taken as seriously as in any other setting. Additionally, we formulated three challenges when designing for play in similar settings: (1) engage intimately with the materials of inexpensive ICT; (2) revisit design recommendations for playfulness to ensure that they can travel/translate into other cultures; and (3) alleviate existing tensions.

  • 28.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons learnt in Vanuatu2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobile phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us - they have become habits, deeply ingrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mobile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetic practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 29.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Höök, Kristina
    Mobile Life @ Stockholm University.
    Bodily Orientations around Mobiles: Lessons Learnt in Vanuatu2011In: Proocedings of CHI'11, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since we started carrying mobiles phones, they have altered the ways in which we orient our bodies in the world. Many of those changes are invisible to us – they have become habits, deeply engrained in our society. To make us more aware of our bodily ways of living with mobiles and open the design space for novel ways of designing mobiles and their interactions, we decided to study one of the last groups of users on earth who had not been exposed to mobiles: the people of Vanuatu. As they had so recently started using mobiles, their use was still in flux: the fragility of the mo-bile was unusual to them as was the need to move in order to find coverage. They were still getting used to carrying their mobiles and keeping them safe. Their encounters with mobile use exposed the need to consider somaesthetics practices when designing mobiles as they profoundly affect our bodily ways of being in the world.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    The Case for Play in the Developing World: Lessons from Rah Island, Vanuatu2015In: Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies / [ed] Laurel Evelyn Dyson, Stephen Grant, Max Hendriks, Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter investigates the potential of mobile technologies for Indigenous empowerment in the context of the Sami community, based on the example of an application for mobile devices that reveals a Sami linguistic landscape via augmented reality. Mobile technology is reshaping not only the media landscape, but also the way people can interact with the environmental landscape. The mobility is approached not only in terms of technological accessibility but also as a practice, i.e., in relation to uses and representations of place, space, and landscape. The potential of linguistic landscapes is emphasized in the problematization and investigation of the effects of public signs on language behaviour. Indigenous linguistic landscapes can contribute to ethnolinguistic vitality and to the strengthening of identity. The mobility of mobile technology can indeed reinforce the sense of place because it can function as a form of digital cartography and place-specific knowledge.

  • 31. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    Höök, Kristina
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008In: NordiCHI '08: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges, 2008, p. 123-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 32.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33. Fitzpatrick, G.
    et al.
    Friedman, B.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Olson, J. S.
    Russell, D. M.
    Daring to change: Creating a slower more sustainable academic life2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id panel06Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous reports and studies point to increasing performance criteria and workplace stress for academics/researchers. Together with the audience, this panel will explore how we experience this in the HCI community, focussing particularly on what we can do to change this for a slower more sustainable academic culture. The future of good quality HCI research is dependent on happy healthy researchers and reasonable realistic academic processes.

  • 34. Forsberg, Mattias
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Svensson, Martin
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Design Principals of Social Navigation1998Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 35.
    Garrett, Rachael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Popova, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Núñez-Pacheco, Claudia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ásgeirsdóttir, Thórhildur
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Felt Ethics: Cultivating Ethical Sensibility in Design Practice2023In: CHI '23: Proceedings of the 2023 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We theoretically develop the ethical positions implicit in somaesthetic interaction design and, using the case study of a water faucet, illustrate our conceptual understanding of ethical sensibilities in design. We apply four lenses – the felt self, intercorporeal self, socio-cultural and political self, and entangled self – to show how our selves and ethical sensibilities are fundamentally constituted by a socially, materially, and technologically entwined world. Further, we show how ethical sensibilities are cultivated in the practice of somaesthetic interaction design. We contribute felt ethics as an approach to cultivating ethical sensibilities in design practice. The felt ethics approach is comprised of (i) a processual cultivation of ethical sensibility through analytical, pragmatic, and practical engagement, (ii) an ongoing critical attentiveness to the limits of our own bodies and lived experiences, and (iii) the rendering visible of our ethical practices as a matter of care.

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  • 36. Gaver, Bill
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    In Search of the Elusive CHI Design Paper2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Gaver, W.
    et al.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    What makes a good CHI design paper?2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 20-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38. Ghajargar, M.
    et al.
    Bardzell, J.
    Smith-Renner, A. M.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Krogh, P. G.
    Graspable AI: Physical Forms as Explanation Modality for Explainable AI2022In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explainable AI (XAI) seeks to disclose how an AI system arrives at its outcomes. But the nature of the disclosure depends in part on who needs to understand the AI and the available explanation modalities (e.g., verbal and visual). Users' preferences regarding explanation modalities might differ, as some might prefer spoken explanations compared to visual ones. However, we argue for broadening the explanation modalities, to consider also tangible and physical forms. In traditional product design, physical forms have mediated people's interactions with objects; more recently interacting with physical forms has become prominent with IoT and smart devices, such as smart lighting and robotic vacuum cleaners. But how tangible interaction can support AI explanations is not yet well understood. In this second studio proposal on Graspable AI (GAI) we seek to explore design qualities of physical forms [12] as an explanation modality for XAI. We anticipate that the design qualities of physical forms and their tangible interactivity can not only contribute to the explainability of AI through facilitating dialogue [5], relationships [18] and human empowerment [15], but they can also contribute to critical and reflective discourses on AI [2, 13]. Therefore, this proposal contributes to design agendas that expand explainable AI into tangible modalities, supporting a more diverse range of users in their understanding of how a given AI works and the meanings of its outcomes. 

  • 39.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Malmö University, Internet of Things and People (IOTAP). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Pennsylvania State University, USA.
    Alison, Smith-Renner
    Dataminr, USA.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Gall Krogh, Peter
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Graspable AI: Physical Forms as Explanation Modality for Explainable AI2022In: TEI '22: Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, Vol. 53, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explainable AI (XAI) seeks to disclose how an AI system arrives at its outcomes. But the nature of the disclosure depends in part on who needs to understand the AI and the available explanation modalities (e.g., verbal and visual). Users’ preferences regarding explanation modalities might differ, as some might prefer spoken explanations compared to visual ones. However, we argue for broadening the explanation modalities, to consider also tangible and physical forms. In traditional product design, physical forms have mediated people’s interactions with objects; more recently interacting with physical forms has become prominent with IoT and smart devices, such as smart lighting and robotic vacuum cleaners. But how tangible interaction can support AI explanations is not yet well understood.

    In this second studio proposal on Graspable AI (GAI) we seek to explore design qualities of physical forms as an explanation modality for XAI. We anticipate that the design qualities of physical forms and their tangible interactivity can not only contribute to the explainability of AI through facilitating dialogue, relationships and human empowerment, but they can also contribute to critical and reflective discourses on AI. Therefore, this proposal contributes to design agendas that expand explainable AI into tangible modalities, supporting a more diverse range of users in their understanding of how a given AI works and the meanings of its outcomes.

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  • 40. Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Renner, Alison Smith
    Krogh, Peter Gall
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Cuartielles, David
    Boer, Laurens
    Wiberg, Mikael
    From "Explainable AI" to "Graspable AI"2021In: TEI 2021 - Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction / [ed] ACM Press, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), researchers have asked how intelligent computing systems could interact with and relate to their users and their surroundings, leading to debates around issues of biased AI systems, ML black-box, user trust, user’s perception of control over the system, and system’s transparency, to name a few. All of these issues are related to how humans interact with AI or ML systems, through an interface which uses different interaction modalities. Prior studies address these issues from a variety of perspectives, spanning from understanding and framing the problems through ethics and Science and Technology Studies (STS) perspectives to finding effective technical solutions to the problems. But what is shared among almost all those efforts is an assumption that if systems can explain the how and why of their predictions, people will have a better perception of control and therefore will trust such systems more, and even can correct their shortcomings. This research field has been called Explainable AI (XAI). In this studio, we take stock on prior efforts in this area; however, we focus on using Tangible and Embodied Interaction (TEI) as an interaction modality for understanding ML. We note that the affordances of physical forms and their behaviors potentially can not only contribute to the explainability of ML systems, but also can contribute to an open environment for criticism. This studio seeks to both critique explainable ML terminology and to map the opportunities that TEI can offer to the HCI for designing more sustainable, graspable and just intelligent systems.

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  • 41.
    Hammarström, Kent Saxin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Ereback, Anna-Lena
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Sjölinder, Marie
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Convene - MUD interfaces for disabled users1999In: Users in Action: Stories of Users and Telematics in Everyday Life, Stockholm, Sweden: Kommunikationsforskningsberedningen (KFB) , 1999, 1, , p. 195Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42. Helmes, John
    et al.
    Taylor, Alex
    Cao, Xiang
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Schmitt, Peter
    Villar, Nicolas
    Rudiments 1, 2 & 3: design speculations on autonomy2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the design process and installation of three speculative, rudimentary machines, or rudiments. Through careful iterations in their design, the rudiments are intended to provoke curiosity and discussion around the possibility of autonomy in interactive systems. The design of the rudiments is described in detail, alongside the design decisions that were made to suggest a machine autonomy and to provoke discussion. Some preliminary reflections from installing the rudiments in two separate households are also reported. Widely divergent opinions of the rudiments from the two households are used to discuss a number of themes for thinking about autonomy and interactive systems design. Overall, the presented work adopts a perspective strongly oriented towards guiding future research, but, importantly, aims to do so by opening up and exposing the design possibilities rather than constraining them.

  • 43.
    Holmquist, Lars Erik
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Juhlin, Oskar
    Waern, Annika
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), ICT, SICS.
    Mobile Life: A Research Foundation for Mobile Services2007In: Proceedings of the 6th Global Mobility Roundtable, 2007, 1, , p. 11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The telecom and IT industry is now facing the challenge of a second IT-revolution, where the spread of mobile and ubiquitous services will have an even more profound effect on commercial and social life than the recent Internet revolution. Users will expect services that are unique and fully adapted for the mobile setting, which means that the roles of the operators will change, new business models will be required, and new methods for developing and marketing services have to be found. Most of all, we need technology and services that put people at core. The industry must prepare to design services for a sustainable web of work, leisure and ubiquitous technology we can call the mobile life. In this paper, we describe the main components of a research agenda for mobile services, which is carried out at the Mobile Life Center at Stockholm University. This research program takes a sustainable approach to research and development of mobile and ubiquitous services, by combining a strong theoretical foundation (embodied interaction), a welldefined methodology (user-centered design) and an important domain with large societal importance and commercial potential (mobile life). Eventually the center will create an experimental mobile services ecosystem, which will serve as an open arena where partners from academia and industry can develop our vision an abundant future marketplace for future mobile servíces.

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  • 44.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    21.10 Commentary by Kristina Hook2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Commentary on: Shusterman, Richard (2013): Somaesthetics (In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/somaesthetics.html)

    In designing for bodily experiences, there has been a lack of theories that can provide the underpinnings we need to understand and deepen our design thinking. Despite all the work we have seen on designing for embodiment (Dourish, 2004, and others), the actual corporeal, pulsating, live, felt body has been notably absent from both theory and practical work. At the same time, digital products have become an integral part of the fabric of everyday life, the pleasures (and pains) they give, their contribution to our social identity, or their general aesthetics are now core features of their design. We see more and more attempts to design explicitly for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task.  With the advent of new technologies, such as biosensors worn on your body, interactive clothes, or wearable computers such as mobiles equipped with accelerometers, a whole space of possibilities for gesture-based, physical and body-based interaction is opened.

    Some claim that the technologies we wear today treat our bodies in a negative way:

    “Electronics, robotics, and spintronics invade and transform the body and, as a consequence of this, the body becomes an object and loses its remaining personal characteristics, those characteristics that might make us consider it as the sacred guardian of our identity.”-- Longo, 2003 

    How can we do a better job in interaction design involving our bodies — the sacred guardians of our identity? This is where I think Shusterman’s theories of somaesthetics are relevant.

  • 45. Höök, Kristina
    A cry for more tech at CHI!2012In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This is a rant. And a plea. And an ad. With this rant, plea, and ad, I hope to attract more attention to the video and interactivity submissions at CHI 2012. But that is just a means to an end. The result I hope for is to make our field influential in shaping a whole new wave of interactions through technologies, the likes of which we have never seen before.

  • 46.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Adaption to the User's Task1995Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adapting explanations to users with varying background knowledge and abilities is a difficult task: the explanation content, style, amount of details, terms used, etc. may be affected in various ways. We have used our analysis of the information seeking tasks of the users in one particular domain as a basis for adaptation. We structured the domain information into a set of information entities where each entity describes one aspect of a node in the information space. Each information entity is fitted to one or several information seeking tasks, and by combining entities we create an explanation adapted to the user's current task. We do not avoid concepts which are unknown to the user in our information entities. Instead we allow the users to ask follow-up questions on those concepts in order to cater the users' differences in background knowledge. Which follow-up questions are available also depends on the users' current task. Finally, we emphasise the need to make the difference between the adapted explanations obvious to the user. Only then can the users predict which explanations best fit their need and thereby control the self-adaptive mechanisms of the system. So, our system is adaptive to the information seeking task of the user, while the user's knowledge, abilities and roles, are catered for by other means.

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  • 47.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Affect and experiential approaches2013In: The SAGE Handbook of Digital Technology Research, Sage Publications, 2013, p. 174-188Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Affective Computing2012In: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction / [ed] Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis, Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation , 2012, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design moved from designing and evaluating work-oriented applications towards dealing with leisure-oriented applications, such as games, social computing, art, and tools for creativity, we have had to consider e.g. what constitutes an experience, how to deal with users’emotions, and understanding aesthetic practices and experiences. Here I will provide a short account of why in particular emotion became one such important strand of work in our field.

  • 49.
    Höök, Kristina
    Stockholms universitet.
    Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment2009In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 364, no 1535, p. 3585-3595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced inseparable from all other aspects of everyday life. Emotion processes are part of our social ways of being in the world; they dye our dreams, hopes and bodily experiences of the world. If we aim to design for affective interaction experiences, we need to place them into this larger picture. 

  • 50.
    Höök, Kristina
    RISE, Swedish ICT, SICS.
    Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment2009In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 364, p. 3585-3595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced inseparable from all other aspects of everyday life. Emotion processes are part of our social ways of being in the world; they dye our dreams, hopes and bodily experiences of the world. If we aim to design for affective interaction experiences, we need to place them into this larger picture.

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