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  • 1.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Creativity in Process Panpsychist Panentheism and the MindIn: Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences, ISSN 2195-9773, E-ISSN 2197-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Whiteheadian panentheism, the underlying metaphysics is often a form of process panpsychism in which creativity is understood as an ‘ultimate’. In this paper I develop the thought that creativity by the ‘reversed panentheistic analogy’, as suggested by Philip Clayton, in combination with the doctrine of Imago Dei, is reflected in the world in general and specifically in the human mind. In a first step, I describe Whiteheadian process panpsychism as a metaphysics in which both creativity and mentality go ‘all the way down’, and argue that a process panpsychist ontology is a reasonable position for panentheists in general. Next, by applying the panentheistic analogy in reverse, together with the doctrine of Imago Dei, the inherent pan-creativity, panpsychism, and with support from scientific research on the human mind, I argue that the process of the human mind, which ultimately results in consciousness and self-consciousness, should be understood both as a creative activity and a re-creation of the world. As a consequence, I suggest that attempts to create artificial consciousness may profit from research in this direction.

  • 2.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Francis Jonbäck. Meningslöst lidande. Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag. 2018. 87 s.2019In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423, Vol. 45, no 5Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism and the Conception of the Ultimate in John B. Cobb’s Process Philosophy2019In: Sophia, ISSN 0038-1527, E-ISSN 1873-930XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of ultimate reality has an important role in the metaphysics of religious pluralism. John B. Cobb—a process philosopher in the Whiteheadian tradition—has suggested not only two ultimates, like other process philosophers, but three ultimates: God, creativity, and the cosmos. Based on this, I argue, firstly, that Cobb’s tripartite conception of the ultimate offers greater conceptual resources for inter-religious dialog than, for example, John Hick’s conception of ultimate reality or ‘the Real’. In support of this first claim, I will apply Cobb’s conception of the ultimate to Zen-Buddhism, thus exemplifying the resources of this conception. Secondly, given the conclusion that Cobb’s conception of the ultimate does indeed offer greater conceptual resources, I further explicate how panentheism, understood as the thesis of a transcendent, immanent divine being who is bilaterally related to the world, can be read in terms of Cobb’s conception of the ultimate. I thus argue that panentheism in general inherits and retains many of the conceptual resources of Cobb’s understanding of the ultimate, and can be seen as a preferable position in relation to religious pluralism. Finally, I conclude from the example of Zen-Buddhism that, although Cobb’s conception offers greater resources for engaging in a dialog from a metaphysical point of view, work has to be done to adequately address questions on the level of soteriology.

  • 4.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism in the light of mathematical understandings of infinity and connectednessIn: Theology and Science, ISSN 1474-6700, E-ISSN 1474-6719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates some consequences of a  mathematical understanding of infinity and connectedness for a panentheistic conception of God.  Given the existence of God and an understanding of the  world in terms of the finite, countable infinity, or uncountable infinity I argue, (a) that a panentheistic conception of God is  supported  given a  mathematical understanding of the infinite, (b) that by applying the notion of uncountable infinity and the mathematical concept of connectedness a panentheistic God can be seen as unifying irrespective of whether the world includes a finite, countably infinite or an uncountably infinite number of entities. 

  • 5.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Panentheism, Panpsychism and Neuroscience: In Search of an Alternative Metaphysical Framework in Relation to Neuroscience, Consciousness, Free Will, and Theistic Beliefs2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis philosophically examines, critically discusses, and proposes how a plausible philosophical framework of consciousness and free will should be formulated. This framework takes into account contemporary scientific research on human consciousness and free will and its possible challenges; also it is examined how this framework should be related to theistic beliefs – especially those connected to human and divine consciousness and free will.

    First, an overview of important research within the natural sciences about the conscious mind is presented together with its challenges to a theistic worldview. Next, questions related to reductive physicalism and dualism as a thesis and an antithesis are discussed. This dialectical approach leads to two lines for possible alternatives: emergence theories and process panpsychism. The subsequent analysis suggests that a form of process panpsychism in combination with a weaker form of emergence is most plausible.

    After a discussion of some central ideas about determinism and indeterminism, together with a brief overview of standard arguments within the philosophical free will debate, the proposed emergent process panpsychism is related to these standard arguments in the free will debate and scientific research about decision-making. As  a result it will be suggested how free will should be understood in relation to the emergent process panpsychism.

    The consequences of these results are then discussed in relation to a theistic worldview. Here panentheism will be suggested as the most reasonable conception of God. Also, the consequences for divine consciousness, divine action and interaction, the human soul, life before birth and after death, and more briefly a personal relationship with God, theological determinism, omniscience, and omnipotence will be discussed specifically in relation to panentheism in an emergent  process panpsychist setting.

  • 6.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Strategier i materialsökning2018In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Stenmark, Mikael; Johannesson, Karin;Zackariasson, Ulf; Jonbäck, Francis, Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2018, p. 39-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Li, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, Studies in Faith and Ideologies, Philosophy of Religion.
    Takeshi Morisato Faith and Reason in Continental and Japanese Philosophy. (New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). Pp. xiv + 269. £76.50 (Hbk). ISBN 9781350092518.In: Religious studies (Print), ISSN 0034-4125, E-ISSN 1469-901XArticle, book review (Other academic)
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