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  • 1.
    Asadi, Sahar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Badica, Costin
    University of Craiova, Craiova, Romania.
    Comes, Tina
    Karslruhe Institute of Technology, Karslruhe, Germany.
    Conrado, Claudine
    Thales Research and Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Evers, Vanessa
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Groen, Frans
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Illie, Sorin
    University of Craiova, Craiova, Romania.
    Steen Jensen, Jan
    Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA), Birkerød, Denmark.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Milan, Bianca
    DCMR, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Neidhart, Thomas
    Space Applications Services, Zaventem, Belgium.
    Nieuwenhuis, Kees
    Thales Research and Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pavlin, Gregor
    Thales Research and Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Pehrsson, Jan
    Prolog Development Center, Brøndby Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pinchuk, Rani
    Space Applications and Services, Zaventem, Belgium.
    Scafes, Mihnea
    University of Craiova, Craiova, Romania.
    Schou-Jensen, Leo
    DCMR, Brøndby Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schultmann, Frank
    Karslruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany.
    Wijngaards, Niek
    Thales Research and Technology, Delft, the Netherlands.
    ICT solutions supporting collaborative information acquisition, situation assessment and decision making in contemporary environmental management problems: the DIADEM approach2011In: Proceedings of the 25th EnviroInfo Conference "Environmental Informatics", Herzogenrath: Shaker Verlag, 2011, p. 920-931Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework of ICT solutions developed in the EU research project DIADEM that supports environmental management with an enhanced capacity to assess population exposure and health risks, to alert relevant groups and to organize efficient response. The emphasis is on advanced solutions which are economically feasible and maximally exploit the existing communication, computing and sensing resources. This approach enables efficient situation assessment in complex environmental management problems by exploiting relevant information obtained from citizens via the standard communication infrastructure as well as heterogeneous data acquired through dedicated sensing systems. This is achieved through a combination of (i) advanced approaches to gas detection and gas distribution modelling, (ii) a novel service-oriented approach supporting seamless integration of human-based and automated reasoning processes in large-scale collaborative sense making processes and (iii) solutions combining Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Scenario-Based Reasoning and advanced human-machine interfaces. This paper presents the basic principles of the DIADEM solutions, explains how different techniques are combined to a coherent decision support system and briefly discusses evaluation principles and activities in the DIADEM project.

  • 2.
    Asadi, Sahar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    TD Kernel DM+V: time-dependent statistical gas distribution modelling on simulated measurements2011In: Olfaction and Electronic Nose: proceedings of the 14th International Symposium on Olfaction and Electronic Nose (ISOEN) / [ed] Perena Gouma, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2011, p. 281-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study gas dispersion, several statistical gas distribution modelling approaches have been proposed recently. A crucial assumption in these approaches is that gas distribution models are learned from measurements that are generated by a time-invariant random process. While a time-independent random process can capture certain fluctuations in the gas distribution, more accurate models can be obtained by modelling changes in the random process over time. In this work we propose a time-scale parameter that relates the age of measurements to their validity for building the gas distribution model in a recency function. The parameters of the recency function define a time-scale and can be learned. The time-scale represents a compromise between two conflicting requirements for obtaining accurate gas distribution models: using as many measurements as possible and using only very recent measurements. We have studied several recency functions in a time-dependent extension of the Kernel DM+V algorithm (TD Kernel DM+V). Based on real-world experiments and simulations of gas dispersal (presented in this paper) we demonstrate that TD Kernel DM+V improves the obtained gas distribution models in dynamic situations. This represents an important step towards statistical modelling of evolving gas distributions.

  • 3.
    Bouguelia, Mohamed-Rafik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Karlsson, Alexander
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Holst, Anders
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Kista, Sweden.
    Mode tracking using multiple data streams2018In: Information Fusion, ISSN 1566-2535, E-ISSN 1872-6305, Vol. 43, p. 33-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most existing work in information fusion focuses on combining information with well-defined meaning towards a concrete, pre-specified goal. In contradistinction, we instead aim for autonomous discovery of high-level knowledge from ubiquitous data streams. This paper introduces a method for recognition and tracking of hidden conceptual modes, which are essential to fully understand the operation of complex environments. We consider a scenario of analyzing usage of a fleet of city buses, where the objective is to automatically discover and track modes such as highway route, heavy traffic, or aggressive driver, based on available on-board signals. The method we propose is based on aggregating the data over time, since the high-level modes are only apparent in the longer perspective. We search through different features and subsets of the data, and identify those that lead to good clusterings, interpreting those clusters as initial, rough models of the prospective modes. We utilize Bayesian tracking in order to continuously improve the parameters of those models, based on the new data, while at the same time following how the modes evolve over time. Experiments with artificial data of varying degrees of complexity, as well as on real-world datasets, prove the effectiveness of the proposed method in accurately discovering the modes and in identifying which one best explains the current observations from multiple data streams. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Bouguelia, Mohamed-Rafik
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Multi-Task Representation Learning2017In: 30th Annual Workshop ofthe Swedish Artificial Intelligence Society SAIS 2017: May 15–16, 2017, Karlskrona, Sweden / [ed] Niklas Lavesson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017, p. 53-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of existing machine learning algorithms assume that training examples are already represented with sufficiently good features, in practice ones that are designed manually. This traditional way of preprocessing the data is not only tedious and time consuming, but also not sufficient to capture all the different aspects of the available information. With big data phenomenon, this issue is only going to grow, as the data is rarely collected and analyzed with a specific purpose in mind, and more often re-used for solving different problems. Moreover, the expert knowledge about the problem which allows them to come up with good representations does not necessarily generalize to other tasks. Therefore, much focus has been put on designing methods that can automatically learn features or representations of the data instead of learning from handcrafted features. However, a lot of this work used ad hoc methods and the theoretical understanding in this area is lacking.

  • 5.
    Chen, Kunru
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Fan, Yuantao
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Predicting Air Compressor Failures Using Long Short Term Memory Networks2019In: Progress in Artificial Intelligence: 19th EPIA Conference on Artificial Intelligence, EPIA 2019, Vila Real, Portugal, September 3–6, 2019, Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Paulo Moura Oliveira, Paulo Novais, Luís Paulo Reis, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 596-609Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce an LSTM-based method for predicting compressor failures using aggregated sensory data, and evaluate it using historical information from over 1000 heavy duty vehicles during 2015 and 2016. The goal is to proactively identify trucks that will require maintenance in the near future, so that component replacement can be scheduled before the failure happens, translating into improved uptime. The problem is formulated as a classification task of whether a compressor failure will happen within the specified prediction horizon. A recurrent neural network using Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) architecture is employed as the prediction model, and compared against Random Forest (RF), the solution used in industrial deployment at the moment. Experimental results show that while Random Forest slightly outperforms LSTM in terms of AUC score, the predictions of LSTM stay significantly more stable over time, showing a consistent trend from healthy to faulty class. Additionally, LSTM is also better at detecting the switch from faulty class to the healthy one after a repair. We demonstrate that this stability is important for making repair decisions, especially in questionable cases, and therefore LSTM model is likely to lead to better results in practice. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

  • 6.
    Cooney, Martin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Järpe, Eric
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Ashfaq, Awais
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Ong, Linda
    I+ srl, Florence, Italy.
    Avoiding Improper Treatment of Dementia Patients by Care Robots2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phrase “most cruel and revolting crimes” has been used to describe some poor historical treatment of vulnerable impaired persons by precisely those who should have had the responsibility of protecting and helping them. We believe we might be poised to see history repeat itself, as increasingly humanlike aware robots become capable of engaging in behavior which we would consider immoral in a human–either unknowingly or deliberately. In the current paper we focus in particular on exploring some potential dangers affecting persons with dementia (PWD), which could arise from insufficient software or external factors, and describe a proposed solution involving rich causal models and accountability measures: Specifically, the Consequences of Needs-driven Dementia-compromised Behaviour model (C-NDB) could be adapted to be used with conversation topic detection, causal networks and multi-criteria decision making, alongside reports, audits, and deterrents. Our aim is that the considerations raised could help inform the design of care robots intended to support well-being in PWD.

  • 7.
    Cooney, Martin
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pinheiro Sant'Anna, Anita
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Fan, Yuantao
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pitfalls of Affective Computing: How can the automatic visual communication of emotions lead to harm, and what can be done to mitigate such risks?2018In: WWW '18 Companion Proceedings of the The Web Conference 2018, New York, NY: ACM Publications, 2018, p. 1563-1566Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What would happen in a world where people could "see'' others' hidden emotions directly through some visualizing technology Would lies become uncommon and would we understand each other better Or to the contrary, would such forced honesty make it impossible for a society to exist The science fiction television show Black Mirror has exposed a number of darker scenarios in which such futuristic technologies, by blurring the lines of what is private and what is not, could also catalyze suffering. Thus, the current paper first turns an eye towards identifying some potential pitfalls in emotion visualization which could lead to psychological or physical harm, miscommunication, and disempowerment. Then, some countermeasures are proposed and discussed--including some level of control over what is visualized and provision of suitably rich emotional information comprising intentions--toward facilitating a future in which emotion visualization could contribute toward people's well-being. The scenarios presented here are not limited to web technologies, since one typically thinks about emotion recognition primarily in the context of direct contact. However, as interfaces develop beyond today's keyboard and monitor, more information becomes available also at a distance--for example, speech-to-text software could evolve to annotate any dictated text with a speaker's emotional state.

  • 8.
    Dahl, Oskar
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Khoshkangini, Reza
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pihl, Claes
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Understanding Association Between Logged Vehicle Data and Vehicle Marketing Parameters - Using Clustering and Rule-Based Machine Learning2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trucks are designed, configured and marketed for various working environments. There lies a concern whether trucks are used as intended by the manufacturer, as usage may impact the longevity, efficiency and productivity of the trucks.

    In this paper we propose a framework that aims to extract costumers' vehicle behaviours from LVD in order to evaluate whether they align with vehicle configurations, so-called GTA parameters. GMMs are employed to cluster and classify various vehicle behaviors from the LVD. RBML was applied on the clusters to examine whether vehicle behaviors follow the GTA configuration. Particularly, we propose an approach based on studying associations that is able to extract insights on whether the trucks are used as intended. Experimental results shown that while for the vast majority of the trucks' behaviors seemingly follows their GTA configuration, there are also interesting outliers that warrant further analysis.

  • 9.
    Dashti, HesamAddin T.
    et al.
    School of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.
    Aghaeepour, NimaSchool of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Asadi, SaharÖrebro University, School of Science and Technology.Bastani, MeysamSchool of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Delafkar, ZahraSchool of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Disfani, Fatemeh M.School of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Ghaderi, Serveh M.School of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Kamali, ShahinSchool of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.Pashami, SepidehÖrebro University, School of Science and Technology.Siahpirani, Alireza F.School of Math and Computer Science, University of Tehran.
    Dynamic Positioning based on Voronoi Cells (DPVC)2006Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we are proposing an approach for flexible positioning of players in Soccer Simulation in a Multi-Agent environment. We introduce Dynamic Positioning based on Voronoi Cells (DPVC) as a new method for players' positioning which uses Voronoi Diagram for distributing agents in the field. This method also uses Attraction Vectors that indicate agents' tendency to specific objects in the field with regard to the game situation and players' roles. Finally DPVC is compared with SBSP as the conventional method of positioning.

  • 10.
    Helldin, Tove
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Riveiro, Maria
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Falkman, Göran
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Byttner, Stefan
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Slawomir, Nowaczyk
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Supporting Analytical Reasoning: A Study from the Automotive Industry2016In: Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services: 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016: Toronto, Canada, July 17-22, 2016. Proceedings, Part II / [ed] Sakae Yamamoto, Cham: Springer, 2016, Vol. 9735, p. 20-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era of big data, it is imperative to assist the human analyst in the endeavor to find solutions to ill-defined problems, i.e. to “detect the expected and discover the unexpected” (Yi et al., 2008). To their aid, a plethora of analysis support systems is available to the analysts. However, these support systems often lack visual and interactive features, leaving the analysts with no opportunity to guide, influence and even understand the automatic reasoning performed and the data used. Yet, to be able to appropriately support the analysts in their sense-making process, we must look at this process more closely. In this paper, we present the results from interviews performed together with data analysts from the automotive industry where we have investigated how they handle the data, analyze it and make decisions based on the data, outlining directions for the development of analytical support systems within the area. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.

  • 11.
    Holst, Anders
    et al.
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bouguelia, Mohamed-Rafik
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Görnerup, Olof
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Al-Shishtawy, Ahmad
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Falkman, Göran
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Alexander
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Said, Alan
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bae, Juhee
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Girdzijauskas, Sarunas
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Soliman, Amira
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eliciting Structure in Data2019In: Joint Proceedings of the ACM IUI 2019 Workshops, Los Angeles, USA, March 20, 2019 / [ed] Christoph Trattner, Denis Parra & Nathalie Riche, Aachen: Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates how to explore and visualize different types of structure in data, including clusters, anomalies, causal relations, and higher order relations. The methods are developed with the goal of being as automatic as possible and applicable to massive, streaming, and distributed data. Finally, a decentralized learning scheme is discussed, enabling finding structure in the data without collecting the data centrally.

  • 12.
    Holst, Anders
    et al.
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Bae, Juhee
    School of Informatics, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Incremental causal discovery and visualization2019In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Interactive Data Mining, WIDM 2019, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discovering causal relations from limited amounts of data can be useful for many applications. However, all causal discovery algorithms need huge amounts of data to estimate the underlying causal graph. To alleviate this gap, this paper proposes a novel visualization tool which incrementally discovers causal relations as more data becomes available. That is, we assume that stronger causal links will be detected quickly and weaker links revealed when enough data is available. In addition to causal links, the correlation between variables and the uncertainty of the strength of causal links are visualized in the same graph. The tool is illustrated on three example causal graphs, and results show that incremental discovery works and that the causal structure converges as more data becomes available. © 2019 Copyright held by the owner/author(s). Publication rights licensed to ACM.

  • 13.
    Khaliq, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Schaffernicht, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bringing Artificial Olfaction and Mobile Robotics Closer Together: An Integrated 3D Gas Dispersion Simulator in ROS2015In: Proceedings of the 16th International Symposium on Olfaction and Electronic Noses, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite recent achievements, the potential of gas-sensitive mobile robots cannot be realized due to the lack of research on fundamental questions. A key limitation is the difficulty to carry out evaluations against ground truth. To test and compare approaches for gas-sensitive robots a truthful gas dispersion simulator is needed. In this paper we present a unified framework to simulate gas dispersion and to evaluate mobile robotics and gas sensing algorithms using ROS. Gas dispersion is modeled as a set of particles affected by diffusion, turbulence, advection and gravity. Wind information is integrated as time snapshots computed with any fluid dynamics computation tool. In addition, response models for devices such as Metal Oxide (MOX) sensors can be integrated in the framework.

  • 14.
    Khoshkangini, Reza
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Warranty Claim Rate Prediction using Logged Vehicle Data2019In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 11804, p. 663-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early detection of anomalies, trends and emerging patterns can be exploited to reduce the number and severity of quality problems in vehicles. This is crucially important since having a good understanding of the quality of the product leads to better designs in the future, and better maintenance to solve the current issues. To this end, the integration of large amounts of data that are logged during the vehicle operation can be used to build the model of usage patterns for early prediction. In this study, we have developed a machine learning system for warranty claims by integrating available information sources: Logged Vehicle Data (LVD) and Warranty Claims (WCs). The experimental results obtained from a large data set of heavy duty trucks are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system to predict the warranty claims. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019.

  • 15.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Change detection in metal oxide gas sensor signals for open sampling systems2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an Open Sampling System (OSS). Changes can occur due to gas source activity such as a sudden alteration in concentration or due to exposure to a different compound. Applications such as gas-leak detection in mines or large-scale pollution monitoring can benefit from reliable change detection algorithms, especially where it is impractical to continuously store or transfer sensor readings, or where reliable calibration is difficult to achieve. Here, it is desirable to detect a change point indicating a significant event, e.g. presence of gas or a sudden change in concentration. The main challenges are turbulent dispersion of gas and the slow response and recovery times of MOX sensors. Due to these challenges, the gas sensor response exhibits fluctuations that interfere with the changes of interest.

    The contributions of this thesis are centred on developing change detection methods using MOX sensor responses. First, we apply the Generalized Likelihood Ratio algorithm (GLR), a commonly used method that does not make any a priori assumption about change events. Next, we propose TREFEX, a novel change point detection algorithm, which models the response of MOX sensors as a piecewise exponential signal and considers the junctions between consecutive exponentials as change points. We also propose the rTREFEX algorithm as an extension of TREFEX. The core idea behind rTREFEX is an attempt to improve the fitted exponentials of TREFEX by minimizing the number of exponentials even further.

    GLR, TREFEX and rTREFEX are evaluated for various MOX sensors and gas emission profiles. A sensor selection algorithm is then introduced and the change detection algorithms are evaluated with the selected sensor subsets. A comparison between the three proposed algorithms shows clearly superior performance of rTREFEX both in detection performance and in estimating the change time. Further, rTREFEX is evaluated in real-world experiments where data is gathered by a mobile robot. Finally, a gas dispersion simulation was developed which integrates OpenFOAM flow simulation and a filament-based gas propagation model to simulate gas dispersion for compressible flows with a realistic turbulence model.

  • 16.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Asadi, Sahar
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Integration of OpenFOAM Flow Simulation and Filament-Based Gas Propagation Models for Gas Dispersion Simulation2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a gas dispersal simulation package which integrates OpenFOAM flow simulation and a filament-based gas propagation model to simulate gas dispersion for compressible flows with a realistic turbulence model. Gas dispersal simulation can be useful for many applications. In this paper, we focus on the evaluation of statistical gas distribution models. Simulated data offer several advantages for this purpose, including the availability of ground truth information, repetition of experiments with the exact same constraints and that intricate issue which come with using real gas sensors can be avoided.Apart from simulation results obtained in a simulated wind tunnel (designed to be equivalent to its real-world counterpart), we present initial results with time-independent and time-dependent statistical modelling approaches applied to simulated and real-world data.

  • 17.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Holst, Anders
    RISE SICS, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bae, Juhee
    School of Informatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Causal discovery using clusters from observational data2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many methods have been proposed over the years for distinguishing causes from effects using observational data only, and new ones are continuously being developed – deducing causal relationships is difficult enough that we do not hope to ever get the perfect one. Instead, we progress by creating powerful heuristics, capable of capturing more and more of the hints that are present in real data.

    One type of such hints, quite surprisingly rarely explicitly addressed by existing methods, is in-homogeneities in the data. Clusters are a very typical occurrence that should be taken into account, and exploited, in the process of identifying causes and effects. In this paper, we discuss the potential benefits, and explore the hints that clusters in the data can provide for causal discovery. We propose a new method, and show, using both artificial and real data, that accounting for clusters in the data leads to more accurate learning of causal structures.

  • 18.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Schaffernicht, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    rTREFEX: Reweighting norms for detecting changes in the response of MOX gas sensors2014In: Sensor Letters, ISSN 1546-198X, E-ISSN 1546-1971, Vol. 12, no 6/7, p. 1123-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     The detection of changes in the response of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system is a hard problem. It is relevant for applications such as gas leak detection in mines or large-scale pollution monitoring where it is impractical to continuously store or transfer sensor readings and reliable calibration is hard to achieve. Under these circumstances, it is desirable to detect points in the signal where a change indicates a significant event, e.g. the presence of gas or a sudden change of concentration. The key idea behind the proposed change detection approach is that a change in the emission modality of a gas source appears locally as an exponential function in the response of MOX sensors due to their long response and recovery times. The algorithm proposed in this paper, rTREFEX, is an extension of the previously proposed TREFEX algorithm. rTREFEX interprets the sensor response by fitting piecewise exponential functions with different time constants for the response and recovery phase. The number of exponentials, which has to be kept as low as possible, is determined automatically using an iterative approach that solves a sequence of convex optimization problems based on l1-norm. The algorithm is evaluated with an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, and mixture ratio, and the gas source is delivered to the sensors exploiting natural advection and turbulence mechanisms. rTREFEX is compared against the previously proposed TREFEX, which already proved superior to other algorithms.

  • 19.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Schaffernicht, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    TREFEX: trend estimation and change detection in the response of mox gas sensors2013In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 7323-7344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many applications of metal oxide gas sensors can benefit from reliable algorithmsto detect significant changes in the sensor response. Significant changes indicate a changein the emission modality of a distant gas source and occur due to a sudden change ofconcentration or exposure to a different compound. As a consequence of turbulent gastransport and the relatively slow response and recovery times of metal oxide sensors,their response in open sampling configuration exhibits strong fluctuations that interferewith the changes of interest. In this paper we introduce TREFEX, a novel change pointdetection algorithm, especially designed for metal oxide gas sensors in an open samplingsystem. TREFEX models the response of MOX sensors as a piecewise exponentialsignal and considers the junctions between consecutive exponentials as change points. Weformulate non-linear trend filtering and change point detection as a parameter-free convexoptimization problem for single sensors and sensor arrays. We evaluate the performanceof the TREFEX algorithm experimentally for different metal oxide sensors and severalgas emission profiles. A comparison with the previously proposed GLR method shows aclearly superior performance of the TREFEX algorithm both in detection performance andin estimating the change time.

  • 20.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A trend filtering approach for change point detection in MOX gas sensors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting changes in the response of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system is a hard problem. It is relevant for applicationssuch as gas leak detection in coal mines[1],[2] or large scale pollution monitoring [3],[4] where it is unpractical to continuously store or transfer sensor readings and reliable calibration is hard to achieve. Under these circumstances it is desirable to detect points in the signal where a change indicates a significant event, e.g. the presence of gas or a sudden change of concentration. The key idea behind the proposed change detection approach isthat a change in the emission modality of a gas source appears locally as an exponential function in the response of MOX sensors due to their long response and recovery times. The proposed method interprets the sensor responseby fitting piecewise exponential functions with different time constants for the response and recovery phase. The number of exponentials is determined automatically using an approximate method based on the L1-norm. This asymmetric exponential trend filtering problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, which is particularly advantageous from the computational point of view. The algorithm is evaluated with an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, and mixture ratio, and it is compared against the previously proposed Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLR) based algorithm [6].

  • 21.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Change detection in an array of MOX sensors2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present an algorithm for online detection of change points in the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system.True change points occur due to changes in the emission modality of the gas source. The main challenge for change point detection in an open sampling system is the chaotic nature of gas dispersion, which causes fluctuations in the sensor response that are not related to changes in the gas source. These fluctuations should not be considered change points in the sensor response. The presented algorithm is derived from the well known Generalized Likelihood Ratio algorithm and it is used both on the output of a single sensor as well on the output of two or more sensors on the array. The algorithm is evaluated with an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. The performance measures considered are the detection rate, the number of false alarms and the delay of detection.

  • 22.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lilienthal, Achim J.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Detecting changes of a distant gas source with an array of MOX gas sensors2012In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 16404-16419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets.

  • 23.
    Pirasteh, Parivash
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Löwenadler, Magnus
    Aftermarket Solutions Department, Volvo Trucks, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Klas
    Service Market Products, Volvo Buses, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ydreskog, Henrik
    Aftermarket Solutions Department, Volvo Trucks, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berck, Peter
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Interactive feature extraction for diagnostic trouble codes in predictive maintenance: A case study from automotive domain2019In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Interactive Data Mining, New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predicting future maintenance needs of equipment can be addressed in a variety of ways. Methods based on machine learning approaches provide an interesting platform for mining large data sets to find patterns that might correlate with a given fault. In this paper, we approach predictive maintenance as a classification problem and use Random Forest to separate data readouts within a particular time window into those corresponding to faulty and non-faulty component categories. We utilize diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) as an example of event-based data, and propose four categories of features that can be derived from DTCs as a predictive maintenance framework. We test the approach using large-scale data from a fleet of heavy duty trucks, and show that DTCs can be used within our framework as indicators of imminent failures in different components.

  • 24.
    Said, Alan
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Parra, Denis
    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
    Bae, Juhee
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    IDM-WSDM 2019: Workshop on Interactive Data Mining2019In: WSDM '19: Proceedings of the Twelfth ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data, New York, NY: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 846-847Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Workshop on Interactive Data Mining is held in Melbourne, Australia, on February 15, 2019 and is co-located with 12th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (WSDM 2019). The goal of this workshop is to share and discuss research and projects that focus on interaction with and interactivity of data mining systems. The program includes invited speaker, presentation of research papers, and a discussion session.

  • 25.
    Sheikholharam Mashhadi, Peyman
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Stacked Ensemble of Recurrent Neural Networks for Predicting Turbocharger Remaining Useful Life2020In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predictive Maintenance (PM) is a proactive maintenance strategy that tries to minimize a system’s downtime by predicting failures before they happen. It uses data from sensors to measure the component’s state of health and make forecasts about its future degradation. However, existing PM methods typically focus on individual measurements. While it is natural to assume that a history of measurements carries more information than a single one. This paper aims at incorporating such information into PM models. In practice, especially in the automotive domain, diagnostic models have low performance, due to a large amount of noise in the data and limited sensing capability. To address this issue, this paper proposes to use a specific type of ensemble learning known as Stacked Ensemble. The idea is to aggregate predictions of multiple models—consisting of Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) and Convolutional-LSTM—via a meta model, in order to boost performance. Stacked Ensemble model performs well when its base models are as diverse as possible. To this end, each such model is trained using a specific combination of the following three aspects: feature subsets, past dependency horizon, and model architectures. Experimental results demonstrate benefits of the proposed approach on a case study of heavy-duty truck turbochargers. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). 

  • 26.
    Vaiciukynas, Evaldas
    et al.
    Department of Information Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Uličný, Matej
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Pashami, Sepideh
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Nowaczyk, Sławomir
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Learning Low-Dimensional Representation of Bivariate Histogram Data2018In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 3723-3735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an increasing amount of data in intelligent transportation systems, methods are needed to automatically extract general representations that accurately predict not only known tasks but also similar tasks that can emerge in the future. Creation of low-dimensional representations can be unsupervised or can exploit various labels in multi-task learning (when goal tasks are known) or transfer learning (when they are not) settings. Finding a general, low-dimensional representation suitable for multiple tasks is an important step toward knowledge discovery in aware intelligent transportation systems. This paper evaluates several approaches mapping high-dimensional sensor data from Volvo trucks into a low-dimensional representation that is useful for prediction. Original data are bivariate histograms, with two types--turbocharger and engine--considered. Low-dimensional representations were evaluated in a supervised fashion by mean equal error rate (EER) using a random forest classifier on a set of 27 1-vs-Rest detection tasks. Results from unsupervised learning experiments indicate that using an autoencoder to create an intermediate representation, followed by $t$-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding, is the most effective way to create low-dimensional representation of the original bivariate histogram. Individually, $t$-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding offered best results for 2-D or 3-D and classical autoencoder for 6-D or 10-D representations. Using multi-task learning, combining unsupervised and supervised objectives on all 27 available tasks, resulted in 10-D representations with a significantly lower EER compared to the original 400-D data. In transfer learning setting, with topmost diverse tasks used for representation learning, 10-D representations achieved EER comparable to the original representation.

1 - 26 of 26
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