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  • 1.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Insights on the sustainability of a Swedish seaweed industry2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultivated seaweed biomass is increasingly perceived as having tremendous potential as a multi-value, environmentally friendly and renewable biomass. Momentum is gathering along the Atlantic coast of Europe and across the world to capitalize on the potential of a more global seaweed industry. In Sweden, these developments have largely been sparked by the Seafarm project and it’s holistic biorefinery approach, which draws on key expertise from five Swedish Universities to lay the foundations for a future seaweed industry. As a part of the project, this thesis principally aimed to effectively assess the sustainability of ongoing developments, most notably through the lenses of viability, environmental life cycle perspectives and potential of a future Swedish seaweed industry. A strategy for assessing sustainability was thus developed with effectiveness in mind and anchored in a broad range of issues highlighted as knowledge gaps by stakeholders; a series of six studies resulted therefrom. Each study contributes insights regarding very specific aspects of the sustainability of a seaweed industry: on the viability of kelp biofuel, threats to viability in the form of potential public aversion to seaweed aquaculture, life cycle perspectives on the cultivation and preservation of seaweed biomass, on the scale and spatial potential of the industry on the West Coast, and finally, on the economic potential of this future industry. This collection of insights contributes six strategic pieces to the vast and dynamic puzzle that is the sustainability of a burgeoning seaweed industry. Together they paint a picture of a viable Swedish seaweed industry with promising potential to contribute positively to key sustainability challenges of the coming decades. 

  • 2.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Nordstrom, Jonas
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Food & Resource Econ, Rolighedsvej 25, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.;Lund Univ, Agrifood Econ Ctr, Lund, Sweden..
    Risen, Emma
    Sweco Environm AB, Gjorwellsgatan 22, S-11260 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    The perception of aquaculture on the Swedish West Coast2018In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 398-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efforts are on the way on the Swedish West Coast to develop the capacity for cultivation of marine resources, notably of kelps. Given that this is a region of great natural and national heritage, public opposition to marine developments has been identified as a possible risk factor. This survey thus sought to shed light on awareness levels, perceptions of different types of aquaculture and on reactions to a scenario depicting future aquaculture developments on the West Coast. When asked about their general opinions of aquaculture, respondents tended to be favourable though a majority chose neutral responses. On the whole, respondents were favourable to the depicted scenario. Finally, it was found that the high-awareness group tended to be more supportive than the low or medium-awareness groups, hinting at the benefits of increasing awareness to reduce public aversion and to support a sustainable development of aquaculture on the Swedish West Coast.

  • 3.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ramos, Filipe Silva
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Identifying Suitable Sites for Macroalgae Cultivation on the Swedish West Coast2019In: COASTAL MANAGEMENT, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 88-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special attention has been paid to sustainable macroalgae cultivation in Europe. The question on where suitable cultivation areas lie, without conflicting with current marine socio-economic activities and respecting the environment, remains a great challenge. Considering 13 criteria critical to seaweed farming such as depth, shipping traffic, and distance to ports, this paper aimed to identify suitable and sustainable offshore areas on the West Coast of Sweden for the cultivation of the Sugar Kelp, Saccharina latissima. An integrated approach with the tools geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria analysis (MCA) was used to aggregate the criteria by means of Boolean and weighted linear combination (WLC) techniques. The Boolean method singled out 544 km(2) as suitable, whereas the WLC method indicated 475 km(2) as highly suitable. Both techniques complement each other in finding optimal sites. Furthermore, the integrated models excelled in providing an overview for effective spatial decision-making that fosters sustainable development of macroalgae cultivations within marine and coastal systems.

  • 4. van Oirschot, R.
    et al.
    Thomas, Jean-Baptiste
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Gröndahl, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Fortuin, K. P. J.
    Brandenburg, W.
    Potting, José
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Explorative environmental life cycle assessment for system design of seaweed cultivation and drying2017In: Algal Research, ISSN 2211-9264, Vol. 27, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seaweeds are presently explored as an alternative source to meet the future protein demand from a growing world population with an increasing welfare level. Present seaweed research largely focuses on agri-technical and economic aspects. This paper explores directions for optimizing the cultivation, harvesting, transport and drying of seaweed from an environmental point of view. An environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) and detailed sensitivity analysis was made for two different system designs. One system design is featuring one layer of cultivation strips (four longlines side by side) interspaced with access corridors. The other system design is featuring a doubling of cultivation strips by dual layers in the water column. Impact profiles and sensitivity analysis showed that the most important impacts came from drying the harvested seaweed, and from the production of the chromium steel chains and polypropylene rope in the infrastructure. This indicates that caution should be used when designing cultivation systems featuring such materials and processes. Furthermore, the high-density productivity of the dual layer system decreases absolute environmental impacts and so found to be a little more environmentally friendly from a life cycle perspective.

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