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  • 1.
    Alvarez Díaz, María Guadalupe
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Lebram, Mikael
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Toftedahl, Marcus
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Your Answer Will Make an Impression: Using Quiz Game Mechanics for the Collection of Visitor Data in a Museum2015In: VS-Games 2015: 7th International Conference on Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications / [ed] Per Backlund, Skövde: IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 1-4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the initial results from a project that aimed to collect visitor data at a traveling exhibition starting at the Regional Museum in Kristianstad, Sweden during 2014-2016. The project was intended also to contribute to the creation of an atmosphere “About time”, which was the subject of the exhibit. We built a system that was integrated as an interactable part of the exhibition by using elements of quiz game mechanics in combination with elements of data based tracking applications and elements of visual art installations. The data provides statistics which are used to visualize the current status of the visitors’ attitude toward specific questions about time, imprinting the visitors themselves an integral part of the exhibition. Visitors build a visual Game Ego when answering questions and at the same time provided statistical data that can be monitored and extracted from the system. The results show that we succeeded to some degree but more can be done towards incorporating game design elements to engage the user, such as feedback and challenge.

  • 2.
    Berg Marklund, Björn
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Backlund, Per
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Dahlin, Carl-Johan
    ius information AB, Skövde, Sweden.
    Engström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    A Game-Based Approach to Support Social Presence and Awareness in Distributed Project-Based Learning2014In: International Journal of Games Based Learning, ISSN 2155-6849, E-ISSN 2155-6857, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important factor for success in project-based learning (PBL) is that the involved project groups establish an atmosphere of social interaction in their working environment. In PBL-scenarios situated in distributed environments, most of a group's work-processes are mediated through the use of production-focused tools that are unconcerned with the important informal and social aspects of a project. On the other hand, there are plenty of tools and platforms that focus on doing the opposite and mainly support informal bonding (e.g., Facebook), but these types of environments can be obtrusive and contain distractions that can be detrimental to a group's productivity and are thus often excluded from working environments. The aim of this paper is to examine how a game-based multi-user environment (MUVE) can be designed to support project-based learning by bridging the gap between productivity-focused and social software. To explore this, the authors developed a game-based MUVE which was evaluated in a PBL-scenario. The result of the study revealed several crucial design elements that are needed to make such a MUVE work effectively, and that the acceptance towards game-based MUVEs is high, even with a rudimentary execution.

  • 3. Calleja, Gordon
    et al.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Hjarvard, Stig
    Hillesund, Terje
    Institutt for medie-, kultur- og samfunnsfag, Universitetet i Stavanger, Norge.
    Bruun, Hanne
    Filmbranschen i Norge under förändring2008In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 150-167Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Kristensen, Lars
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Roger Caillois and Marxism: A Game Studies Perspective2017In: Games and Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, ISSN 1555-4120, E-ISSN 1555-4139, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 381-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors look at Caillois’ reflections on the dichotomy between work and leisure in relation to Marxism, whose dialectics are shown to influence the milieu under which Caillois developed his ideas. The contribution interrogates this labor/play dialectic while looking at recent literature on games being produced within the current capitalist and neoliberal system, focusing on phenomena like “playbour” and on key elements discussed in these theories, from the affordances and limitations of technology to the immaterial technological tools used by gamers and game makers. The article argues that looking at Caillois in relation to Marxism would provide an interesting critical perspective, one that has been underexplored by current approaches. The authors note that contemporary concerns on capitalism and games are far from being at odds with Caillois’ distinction between labur and play and suggest that the influence of Marxism on Caillois’ writings would provide an interesting terrain of further discussion.

  • 5.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Ekman, Stefan
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    A Literary Excursion Into the Hidden (Fan) Fictional Worlds of Tetris, Starcraft, and Dreamfall2009In: Breaking New Ground: Innovation in Games, Play, Practice and Theory, DiGRA , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss a part of participatory culture that so far has not received much attention in the academic world; it is the writing and reading of game fan fiction. The focus in this paper is on fan fiction, based on three different games that represent three different game genres: Tetris, StarCraft and Dreamfall: The Longest Journey. The aim is to advance our understanding of how players experience and understand the game environment, and promote further research interest in fan fiction based on computer games. We do this by discussing narrative elements in the above mentioned computer games, and the fan fiction that is based on them.

  • 6.
    Susi, Tarja
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Torstensson, Niklas
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    "Can you send me a photo?": A Game-Based Approach for Increasing Young Children’s Risk Awareness to Prevent Online Sexual Grooming2019In: DiGRA '19 - Proceedings of the 2019 DiGRA International Conference: Game, Play and the Emerging Ludo-Mix / [ed] Akinori Nakamura, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a game-based approach for raising young children's online risk awareness, to decrease the risk of becoming the subject of sexual grooming. Hidden in the Park is an adventure game, including a classic game board and a tablet with Augmented Reality-technology. The game mechanics are based on data from true grooming processes. The game's target group is children aged 8-10 years. This paper describes the game development, from a prototype to an approved release version that will be released as a non-profit product during 2019. We describe the creation of the game mechanics, the iterative development process, and game evaluation. 25 pupils in the target group participated, but the ages 7-12 (n=70) were included to evaluate whether the game would suit the intended target group. Results show that the game is fun and engaging but that it also raise questions concerning online activities.

  • 7.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Computer games as play ground and stage2006In: international conference on Game research and development, 2006, 2006, p. 62-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the environment in computer games is discussed from a narratological and ludological perspective focused on the idea of environmental affordances and their inflictions on game play. The basic terminology used stems from Roger Caillois, Michail Bakhtin, James J. Gibson and Ulf Wilhelmsson respectively. The conclusion drawn in the paper is that the environment in games, free play and computer games serve as a playground and stage of purposeful objects that propose affordances and constraints upon the Game Ego manifestation within the game.

  • 8.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Datorspel som lekplats och skådeplats: Rummets roll i lek och narration2007In: Datorsplandes Dynamik: Lekar och roller i en digital kultur, Studentlitteratur, 2007, p. 137-154Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Film as virtual time space reconstruction2007In: The Virtual: Designing Digital Experience. A Conference 2006, 2007, p. 310-318Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Game Ego presence in video and computer games2008In: Extended Experiences / [ed] O Leino, H Wirman & F Amyris, Lapland University Press , 2008, p. 58-72Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Game Ego presence in video and computer games discusses the narrative experience from computer games from the perspective of the player agency within the game environment. Ludology and narratology are discussed as are the cultural and scientific dimensions of games and play in general as well as computer and video games in particular in order to broaden the perspective on games and narratives respectively. The central idea is that the Game Ego is the bodily based function that allows the player to exert control and interact with the game environment through a tactile motor/kinesthetic link. The concept of a Game Ego is based on experientialist cognitive theory and the work of George Lakoff and Mark Johnson.

  • 11.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Roger Caillois ur en narratologs perspektiv2008In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 110-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classic work Les jeux et les hommes (2001/1958) by the French sociologist Roger Caillois is put in analytical relation to the fields of narratology and dramaturgy, mainly by a comparison to some thoughts and ideas in Mats Ödeen´s Dramatiskt berättande (1988). The purpose is to highlight in what way Caillois´s theory can be applied to the study of narratives and to identify analogies between narrations and games. The emphasis of the article is on a description of narratives bases on Caillois´s concept of game. Caillois´s six criteria for game and play as process and phenomenon are systematically investigated: voluntarity, separation in time and space from ordinary life, unpredictability, improductivity, regulated by rules, and fictional. The article concludes that these parameters are valid definitional criteria for narratives as well.

  • 12.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    What is a Computer/ Video game experience?2007In: The Virtual: Designing Digital Experience. A Conference 2006, 2007, p. 34-50Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    What is a Game Ego: or How the embodied mind plays a role in computer game environments2006In: Affective and Emotional Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction: Game-Based and Innovative Learning Approaches, IOS Press, 2006, p. 45-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What is a Game Ego (or How the embodied mind plays a role in computer game environments) addresses questions concerning why and how a computer game player identifies her or himself with a Game Ego in computer game environments. The theoretical framework used to address these questions is drawn mainly from three fields of research: film theory (including theories on narration and narratives) theories on visual perception (which are also applicable to sound) and finally experientialist cognitive theory. The central claims of this paper are: the process of identification with a manifestation of a Game Ego has a bodily basis. The Game Ego is primarily a bodily based function that enacts a point of being within the game environment through a tactile motor/kinesthetic link. The human conceptual system shows a relationship to the motor system of the human body and is tightly connected to the emotional system so that no clear-cut boundary can be drawn between them. The more direct and immediate the control of this agent is, the stronger the identification is as well.

  • 14.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Engström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Brusk, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Östblad, Per Anders
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Inclusive game design facilitating shared gaming experience2017In: Journal of Computing in Higher Education, ISSN 1042-1726, E-ISSN 1867-1233, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 574-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the result from a study comparing the perception and understanding of a game story between sighted and visually impaired players playing the same game. In particular, whether sighted and visually impaired players could experience and recount the same story construed from the plot elements that are either manifested by audio and graphics in the case of sighted players or pri- marily by audio in the case of visually impaired players. To this end, we have developed a graphical point-and-click adventure game for iOS and Android devices that aims to show how inclusive game design may be used to facilitate a shared gaming experience between sighted and visually impaired players. The game pro- vides players with audio feedback that enables visually impaired players to interact with and experience the game, but in a manner that does not interfere with the overall appearance and functionality of the game. Thus, it has been designed to be fully inclusive to both groups of players and to give the same gaming experience when it comes to story content. The game has been evaluated through formal user tests where subjects have been asked to play the first chapter of the game followed by an interview. The study shows that the perception of the story was almost identical between the two groups. Generally it took visually impaired players a little longer to play the game but they also seem to listen more carefully to the dialogue and hence also build a slightly deeper understanding of the characters. The study also shows that the sighted players did not respond negatively towards the inclusive game design employed in the game. 

  • 15.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Engström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Brusk, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Östblad, Per-Anders
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Accessible Game Culture using Inclusive Game Design: Participating in a visual culture that you cannot see2015In: VS-Games 2015: 7th International Conference on Games and Virtual Worlds for Serious Applications / [ed] Per Backlund, Red Hook, NY: IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 147-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the result of an experiment, in which we compare the gaming experience between sighted players and visually impaired players playing the same game. Specifically we discuss whether they experience the same story construed from the plot elements that are either manifested by audio and graphics in the case of sighted players or primarily by audio in the case of visually impaired players. To this end, we have developed a graphical point-and-click adventure game for iOS and Android devices. The game has been designed to provide players with audio feedback that enables visually impaired players to interact with and experience the game, but in a manner that does not interfere with the overall appearance and functionality of the game, i.e. a design that is fully inclusive to both groups of players and that is as invisible for sighted players as possible without hindering visually impaired players to share the same gaming experience when it comes to story content. The study shows that the perception of the story were almost identical between the two groups. Generally it took visually impaired players a little longer to play the game but they also seem to listen more carefully to the dialogue and hence also build a slightly deeper understanding of the characters.

  • 16.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Toftedahl, Marcus
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Susi, Tarja
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Torstensson, Niklas
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Sjölin, Anders
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Tuori, Petri
    LBS Borås, Sweden.
    A Computer Game for an Enhanced Visitor Experience: Integration of Reality and Fiction2014In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction 2014 Game and Entertainment Technologies 2014 and Computer Graphics, Visualization, Computer Vision and Image Processing 2014 - Part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, MCCSIS 2014 / [ed] Katherine Blashki & Yincai Xiao, IADIS Press, 2014, p. 149-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of a computer game for enhanced visitor experiences of an adventure tour, in which the game is integrated. The game project was run 2011-2013 and included the development of an arcade style two player cooperative computer game, game controls, graphics, sound and music. The adventure tour takes place in an old military fortress where visitors participate in searching for gold that has been stolen. The tour starts with a 3D movie that provides the plot and introduces hero and villain characters. The story is then carried forth by a game master who brings the visitors on a tour along the fortress’ vaults, during which they also play the computer game. The adventure tour is structured by a semi-fictional framing story that interweaves history, physical environment, and hero and villain characters. To withhold interdependency in the overall design of the adventure tour and the game, Caillois’s (1958/2001) taxonomy for games was chosen as a basis, combined with narrative key elements carried across the adventure tour. The game was also designed to accord with the embodied nature of human activity, allowing players to engage their whole bodies in the gameplay. Initial game evaluation results indicate the game contributes to an enhanced visitor experience of the adventure tour.

  • 17.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wallén, Jacob
    Sweden.
    A Combined Model for the Structuring of Computer Game Audio2011In: Game Sound Technology and Player Interaction: Concepts and Developments / [ed] Mark Grimshaw, IGI Global, 2011, p. 98-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a model for the structuring of computer game audio building on the IEZA-framework (Huiberts & van Tol, 2008), Murch’s (1998) conceptual model for the production of film sound, and the affordance theory put forth by Gibson (1977/1986). This model makes it possible to plan the audio layering of computer games in terms of the relationship between encoded and embodied sounds, cognitive load, the functionality of the sounds in computer games, the relative loudness between sounds, and the dominant frequency range of all the different sounds. The chapter uses the combined model to provide exemplifying analyses of three computer games—F.E.A.R., Warcraft III, and Legend of Zelda—. Furthermore, the chapter shows how a sound designer can use the suggested model as a production toolset to structure computer game audio from a game design document.

  • 18.
    Östblad, Per Anders
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Engström, Henrik
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Brusk, Jenny
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Backlund, Per
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Wilhelmsson, Ulf
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Inclusive game design: audio interface in a graphical adventure game2014In: 9th Audio Mostly: A Conference on Interaction With Sound (AM '14). ACM, New York, NY, USA, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2014, p. 8-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lot of video games on the market are inaccessible to players with visual impairments because they rely heavily on use of graphical elements. This paper presents a project aimed at developing a point-and-click adventure game for smart phones and tablets that is equally functional and enjoyable by blind and sighted players. This will be achieved by utilizing audio to give blind players all necessary information and enjoyment without graphics. In addition to creating the game, the aim of the project is to identify design aspects that can be applied to more types of games to include more players. This paper also presents a pilot study that has been conducted on an early version of the game and the preliminary findings are discussed.

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