Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 54
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Coping with the knowledge sharing barriers in Product Service Systems design2010In: Proceedings of TMCE 2010 Symposium: Eighth international symposium on Tools and methods of competitive engineering ; April 12-16, 2010, Ancona, It / [ed] I. Horvath; F. Mandorli; Z. Rusak, Delft: Faculty of Industrial Design of Engineering, University of Technology, , 2010, p. 903-915Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the knowledge sharing process that characterizes Product Service Systems (PSS) design, drawing on data from an in-depth study in the Swedish manufacturing industry. It categorizes and describes the most relevant knowledge sharing barriers affecting early PSS development phases, discussing them in terms of capabilities to be included in a knowledge engineering system to fulfil the increasing need for knowledge in product-service design. To cope with these barriers, the authors introduce the concept of Engineering 2.0, which borrows the general Web 2.0 concept and translates it into engineering terms, going into the details of how functional product development may benefit from the possibility to integrate bottom-up and "lightweight" knowledge sharing techniques with traditional PLM/PDM/CAD solutions, and highlighting the most relevant challenges for the Engineering 2.0 research.

  • 2.
    Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Engineering 2.0: an approach to support cross-functional teams in overcoming the knowledge sharing barriers in PSS design2011In: International Journal of Product Development, ISSN 1477-9056, E-ISSN 1741-8178, Vol. 15, no 1/2/3, p. 115-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the key enabling mechanisms introduced byWeb 2.0 technologies that can support Product Service Systems (PSSs)development teams in increasing the quality of early design decisions.The paper collects success stories and lessons learned from two empirical casestudies in the aeronautical supply chain, and from a set of questionnairesforwarded to major automotive manufacturers, about the implementation ofEngineering 2.0 tools, such as wikis, blogs and forums, to overcomeknowledge-sharing barriers between cross-functional design teams. The studyreveals that bottom-up and lightweight technologies can enable theimplementation of more value-driven development processes, providing meansfor locating expertise in the extended organisation, for capturing the ‘context’of the information managed, and for assessing and validating knowledge assetsin a more collaborative fashion. Eventually, it points to the most relevant issuesthat currently prevent the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies in a productdevelopment setting.

  • 3.
    Bertoni, Marco
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Larsson, Tobias
    Isaksson, Ola
    Randall, Dave
    Department of Sociology, Manchester Metropolitan University.
    The rise of social product development2012In: International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations, ISSN 1470-9503, E-ISSN 1741-5225, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 188-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the rising potential of social software to increase the knowledge management capabilities of virtual product development teams. It presents six fundamental transitions, elaborated from the empirical findings, which justify the rise of a more bottom-up, social creation and sharing of engineering knowledge in the virtual organisation. The study suggests that traditional engineering knowledge management approaches alone are not sufficient to support development activities in the virtual organisation, and that such teams display an increasing demand for social, comparatively lightweight and remixable platforms for bottom-up, social creation and sharing of knowledge.

  • 4. Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Exploring lightweight knowledge sharing technologies for functional product development2010In: Industrial product-service systems (IPS²): proceedings of the 2nd CIRP IPS² Conference [2010, Linköping, 14-15 April] / [ed] Tomohiko Sakao, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010, p. 347-354Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moving away from offering just physical artifacts to becoming providers of functional products, or Product-Service Systems (PSS), implies inevitable changes in the way engineering knowledge is identified and shared in a cross company environment. Capturing downstream knowledge assets and making them available to cross-functional teams becomes crucial to approach ill-defined problems in PSS design. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Web 2.0-based knowledge sharing technologies may be used to support the design of functional products. The article, drawing on data from several industrial development projects in various segments, introduces the concept of “lightweight technologies” as a means to lower the threshold related to the sharing of downstream engineering knowledge assets. The paper points out potential benefits and challenges related to the adoption of a lightweight approach and provides examples of how tools like wikis, blogs or social bookmarking may be used to support functional product engineers.

  • 5.
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Bertoni, Marco
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Knowledge sharing across boundaries: Web 2.0 and product-service system development2011In: Research into Design: Supporting Sustainable Product Development / [ed] Amaresh Chakrabarti, Bangalore, India: Research Publishing Services, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest among product development organizations to capitalize on engineering knowledge as their core competitive advantage for innovation. Capturing, storing, retrieval, sharing and reusing of engineering knowledge from a wide range of enterprise memory systems have become crucial activities of knowledge management practice in competitive organizations. In light of a changing and dynamic enterprise definition, including a move towards Product-Service System (PSS) development, this paper discusses some of the limitations of current enterprise systems in reusing engineering knowledge across functional and corporate boundaries. Further, the paper illustrates how Web 2.0-based collaborative technologies can leverage cross-functional knowledge for new PSS development projects through an open, bottom-up, and collective sense-making approach to knowledge management.

  • 6.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Design thinking challenges in education2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2009, p. 89-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development processes are commonly represented in sequential models covering the necessary stages from planning to product rollout, while processes to take needs into the development activities show other aspects, namely that understanding needs requires, for a product developer, additional skills. In our curricula for engineering design education we apply some aspects of design thinking to bring together (a) business savvy, in terms of understanding people’s needs as market opportunities, and (b) product development process, in terms of team-based creativity and collaborative skills, with (c) the basic engineering knowledge. This is a demanding aim, much because the approaches, methods and mindsets differ widely from what the students are used to. Hence, in this paper we elaborate on our efforts to educate engineers in design thinking to provide insights into some challenges for engineering design.  Three key challenges are identified, (1) integrative approaches are not straightforwardly implemented, (2) training of ‘soft’ capabilities to provide a change in thinking, and (3) social competence to make use of design thinking.

  • 7. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Nergård, Henrik
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Prompting innovation: dedicated places2008In: Proceedings: 2nd Conference on Nordic Innovation Research, December 3-4 2007; Luleå University of Technology / [ed] Håkan Ylinenpää, Luleå tekniska universitet, 2008, p. 161-173Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our view, close collaboration in joint work meetings has gained limited attention from universities. Our vision for promoting innovative forms of academia-industry collaboration is to bridging meeting content, goal and physical domains to facilitate the meetings and everyday interactions of creative and innovative teams. This paper provides an outline of how an emerging approach for team innovation encourages a reorganization of research and development work, as well as provides a new rational for the design and use of collaborative work spaces. The opportunity to dedicate a room, i.e., a boiler room, for creative collaborative meetings occurred when our offices was going to be refurbished. The space, i.e., the physical constraints of the room, was given. Structurally, it is a typical squared room, nothing remarkable about that. However, by observing and talking about our own collaboration and meetings a set of needs was identified. For the boiler room these needs was captured in the words static and flexible. On the foundation of these words the boiler room has been furnish. A furniture FocIn-FocOut was designed to guide people into different modes. The rationale for the boiler room has been made visible and thereby, also the notion of place as a cultural phenomena.

  • 8.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Learning for product innovation engineering2014In: Proceedings of the 13th International Design Conference, DESIGN 2014: May 19-22 2014, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] Dorian Marjanović; Mario Štorga; Neven Pavković; Nenad Bojčetić, Zagreb: Design Research Society, 2014, p. 1371-1380Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Tobias C.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Lund University.
    Revisiting the research field of product-service systems development2012In: Proceedings of the ASME 2012 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences & Computers and Information in Engineering Conference: IDETC/CI, New York: American Society of Mechanical Engineers , 2012, Vol. 3, p. 1043-1049Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product-Service Systems (PSS) has now for more than a decade been a research interest in Europe and Japan. The research aims to support manufacturing industries’ ability to provide value in terms of a service offer to its customers, simultaneously taking a more holistic approach to eco-sustainability. The idea of providing customer benefits in parallel with robust products is not new, yet equipping engineers to integrate a radical innovation and service perspective in the early design stages is received as fairly radical. Prevailing methods, tools and design thinking are barriers that prevents approaching PSS by the necessary integration of several, but distinct, logics.Due to the inclusion of both product development and service development in development of PSS, at least, two schools of thoughts exist within the research field of PSS development. Namely, one based on product development rationality and one based on service provision reasoning. In general, such a situation would be a base for a conflict where the debate focuses, which strand that should be more valid than the other. However, if so, this would certainly not benefit the need for cross-disciplinarily research of PSS. The purpose in this paper is two-fold; first, to describe PSS research efforts by acknowledging both the product and the service perspective, second to explore and discuss future directions and by that identify “white spots” on the map which may be seen as relevant to bridge the integration gap.

  • 10.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Expanding the social dimension: Towards a knowledge base for radical product innovation2011In: Impacting society through engineering design: ICED 11 København, the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 15th - 18th August 2011, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Copenhagen, Denmark ; proceedings volumes / [ed] Steve J. Culley; Ben Hicks; Tim McAloone; T.J. Howard, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2011, Vol. 3 : Design organisation and management, p. 143-152Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extension of businesses to incorporate the provision of function as a service in supplement to standalone products is an ongoing movement in manufacturing industry. In short, this means that the development intent should be guided by the need of ‘performance in use’ that the customer wants, e.g. thrust rather than an engine. By this, the established knowledge base challenges the development team.This paper embarks from the assumption that there are three main challenges, i.e. (1) innovation activities, (2) customer data acquisition and (3) the transformation of data into design information. The purpose is to discuss knowledge sharing activities to contribute to product-service innovation. In this study it has been found that contemporary data acquisition activities filter out important dimensions of knowledge. Thus, does not provide a sound base for service provisions.

  • 11. Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    In search of what is missing: needfinding the SIRIUS way2007In: Proceedings of the Fourth IASTED International Conference on Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Engineering: November 29 - December 1, 2006, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands / [ed] M. Boumedine; C. Touzet, Anaheim: ACTA Press, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Listen closely to your customers, and you are more likely to design products that actually meet or even exceed their needs.”: Such statements have come to dominate company innovation strategies in the last decade, but in reality involving customers in product development is not as straightforward as it sounds. Customers, it is becoming clear, cannot always express their needs adequately. Especially, in the case of innovative products where the starting position by definition includes no existing solution, applying a user-orientated approach is paramount. We argue that techniques for ‘needfinding’ must be the point of departure. This has importance both in terms of methodological issues – how to find customer needs? – and for organizational work – who should be engaged in finding customer needs? In our view, engineers must be involved in identifying and understanding those needs. We have learnt through a series of studies, that structured needfinding by engineers during the earliest phases of product development could better support the process of identifying needs and thereby guide design projects. In this way, two basic problems are overcome. Firstly, identifying needs which are otherwise difficult to articulate becomes possible. Secondly, translation difficulties between customers and engineers are eradicated

  • 12.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Madelene
    Need driven product development in team-based projects2007In: Design for society: knowledge, innovation and sustainability ; ICED '07 - Paris, 16th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 28 - 30 August 2007, Paris, France ; conference proceedings, Paris, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, practical activities of needfinding - an intertwined approach to identifying needs and to visualizing idea concepts in early design - are described and discussed. This is done primarily to gain an increased understanding of the various representations of user needs that are fed into the fuzzy front-end activities of team-based product innovation projects. The empirical basis comes from a study of an eight-month collaborative product development project, performed under realistic conditions by MSc students in close collaboration with their client.Focusing closely on customers and their needs is encouraged within the conceptual framework of Integrated Product Development and is increasingly highlighted as a key enabler in the design of truly innovative products. Despite the fact that identified customer needs are considered as the initial and primary input into such an innovation process, it can be argued that the design teams do not commonly have a sufficient understanding of customer needs and they do not normally interact with customers in their environment. Besides focusing on measurable aspects of user behaviour and requirements, a traditional approach to identifying and managing customer needs usually includes several interpretive stages before being handed over to the design team. In the context of innovative products, the identification and definition of customers and their needs is a non-trivial and difficult exercise. It involves, we suggest, not only needfinding but also the definition of ‘those who might need the product’, users and customers to co-evolve iteratively in the early phases of design.

  • 13.
    Hicks, Ben
    et al.
    University of Bath.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Culley, Steve
    University of Bath.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A methodology for evaluating technology readiness during product development2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl; Martin Grimheden; Larry Leifer; Philipp Skogstad; John Clarkson, Design Research Society, 2009, Vol. 3: Design Organization and Management, p. 157-168Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Hicks, Ben
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Department of Design Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Lund University.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Knowledge maturity as a means to support decision making during product-service systems development projects in the aerospace sector2011In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Streamlining new product development forces companies to make decisions on preliminary information. This paper considers this challenge within the context of project management in the aerospace sector, and in particular the development of product-service systems. The concept of knowledge maturity is explored as a means to provide practical decision support, which increases decision makers' awareness of the knowledge base and supports cross-boundary discussions on the perceived maturity of available knowledge, thereby identifying and mitigating limitations. Requirements are elicited from previous research on knowledge maturity in the aerospace industry and a knowledge maturity model is developed through five industry-based workshops.

  • 15.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Virtual meeting interoperability: discussing the need of support for heterogeneous meeting environments2007In: Proceedings of the Fourth IASTED International Conference on Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Engineering: November 29 - December 1, 2006, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands / [ed] M. Boumedine; C. Touzet, Anaheim: ACTA Press, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With more projects in today's industry being global it is important to support the people collaborating in these projects. Travel is expensive and time consuming and is not viable in the long run. Although some travel is necessary it is important for people to meet virtually instead. In many cases it is difficult for companies to collaborate because they do not use the same tools for these virtual meetings. Due to restrictions with IT security it is also difficult and expensive to implement every new tool their partner companies use. One solution could be a portal that facilitates connecting users with different virtual meeting tools. Using Web Services to bridge the different protocols it would be possible to connect two software packages that are using different standards for virtual meetings. With a tool as this it would be possible for chosen companies to collaborate closely online although they have incompatible software packages. Companies can select their solutions on the basis of their needs and do not have to implement a new solution or modify their existing setup to accommodate new partner needs. Finally, people would only need to learn the one tool which is available in their own company.

  • 16. Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Knowledge enabled engineering - knowledge lifecycle approach2007In: Svenska Mekanikdagar 2007: Program och abstracts / [ed] Niklas Davidsson; Elianne Wassvik, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2007, p. 102-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    VIVACE is an EC-funded integrated project that addresses aeronautics´ vision for the year 2020. More specifically VIVACE intends to achieve cost reduction and time reduction in new aircraft development. VIVACE consists of three sub-projects where the two first extracts problems from aircraft and engine industries respectively. The third sub-project collects these problems and develops advanced capabilities (methods, tools, guidelines, etc.). The ’Knowledge Enabled Engineering’ (KEE) work package in sub-project three focuses issues on concerns associated with knowledge within an extended enterprise. This includes both Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) issues, but also more general questions about engineering knowledge. The work starts in analysing requirements from use cases via finding existing solutions to conducting tests in the form of pilots. Finally the knowledge acquired is disseminated to both the aeronautics community and also to a wider audience in Europe and the rest of the world.

  • 17. Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Tobias
    Isaksson, Ola
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Gated maturity assessment: supporting gate review decision documents with maturity of knowledge assessment2008In: CIRP Design Conference 2008: April 7 - 9, 2008, Enschede / [ed] Fred J. A. M. van Houten, Enschede: Laboratory of Design, Production and Management, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Univ. of Twente , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In aeronautics industry today, companies collaborate closely in virtual enterprises to develop products and solutions that are more integrated and more complex, and that aims to target larger responsibilities regarding the product life-cycle. On top of this, lead-time and development costs needs to be reduced.The 7 Day Proposal (7DP) is the conceptual name of a framework wherein a customized proposal is produced by a virtual enterprise consortium within seven days from a received request for proposal. This is substantially shorter than what is current practice today and implies that new methods, tools and ways of working are needed. Today, in offer processes, time is lost because of insufficient, or immature, available information and knowledge at gate reviews when decisions are due, causing time consuming iterations. The Gated Maturity Assessment (GMA) concept is intended to help reduce these costly iterations by targeting the ambiguity at these gate reviews in order to reduce the uncertainty in decision base. Other frameworks using maturity include Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM). TRL is an artefact-focused framework developed by NASA to assess space technology maturity. CMM is a process-focused framework for assessing organisations' software development process capability (maturity). The GMA is a concept for assessing the maturity of the knowledge that goes into a gate review (i.e. a decision document). The GMA is intended to support decision makers by assuring confidence in these decision points and thereby reducing the number of iterations, hereby reducing lead-time and increases the quality of the process.This paper reports on the development of the GMA concept from the 7DP use case, and also the development of a support tool intended for use in the 7DP process. Essentially, the 7DP process is a stage-gate process like many corporate product development processes with a number of decision gates. Therefore there is a future wish to move towards an engineering design context with this concept. The work is part of the 70 million € European project VIVACE where GMA is part of a Knowledge Enabled Engineering solution to the 7DP use case.

  • 18.
    Johansson, Christian
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    How are knowledge and information evaluated?: decision making in stage-gate processes2009In: Design has never been this cool: ICED 09, the 17th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 24 - 27 August 2009, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA ; proceedings volume / [ed] Margareta Norell Bergendahl; Martin Grimheden; Larry Leifer, Design Research Society, 2009, Vol. 1: Design processes, p. 195-206Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stage-Gate processes decisions are made based on the knowledge and information developed during the preceding phase. The purpose of this study is to explore the current state-of-practice in industry regarding the assessment of knowledge and information at gate. The result indicates that gate reviews relates mainly to assessments of technical performance and function. Relatively little attention is given to assess the quality of the knowledge base, making it difficult to identify outdated, irrelevant and non-applicable information and knowledge. Further, tacit knowledge plays an important role in the decision making process, as reviewers ask for design rationale and further evidence of what has been done, and why. However, evaluating such knowledge is currently a poorly understood aspect of gate reviews. Conclusions drawn is that, although the specific focus of such meetings is not the evaluation of knowledge and information, there is a promising opportunity to work towards a better support of such activities, especially since the respondents perceive benefits coming from an increased attention to assessments of both the explicit and tacit knowledge base used in gate reviews.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Isaksson, Ola
    Information driven collaborative engineering: enabling functional product innovation2005In: Challenges in Collaborative Engineering: CCE '05 ; the knowledge perspective in collabotative engineering ; proceedings of the international workshop, 14th - 15th April 2005, Sopron, Hungary in conjunction with DDECS '05 / [ed] Gianni Jacucci, Interprint , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20. Kastensson, Åsa
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Embracing risk to pursue product innovation in automotive industry2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Banking on social capital: towards social connectedness in distributed engineering design teams2007In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 605-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea of an engineering design team as a closely knit, physically co-located community is dissolving as companies become increasingly geographically dispersed. Engineers work together with more people than ever before, but often with very limited knowledge of who they are actually working with, what their collaborators know, and to what extent they can be trusted. Engineering design is a domain where good decision-making is absolutely critical, and building social capital is particularly significant since engineers deal with inherently ambiguous requirements and problems. The fieldwork presented below suggests that ‘Know-Who' is a key dimension of expertise sharing in distributed collaborative engineering.

  • 22. Larsson, Andreas
    Engineering know-who: why social connectedness matters to global design teams2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The background of this thesis is the development of global, ‘virtual’, collaboration teams in the engineering domain. Distributed concurrent engineering is probably the ‘holy grail’ of current research into collaborative engineering. In this thesis, I seek to identify what some of the challenges for effective distributed collaborative engineering might be. The guiding theme of my work is the assumption that these challenges are not merely technical. Rather, I deal with the challenge of successfully merging what is required ‘socially’ with what is required technically. Methodologically, this thesis draws on an orientation to be found in Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), whereby ethnographic approaches – in-situ studies of practice – inform design work. I apply this broad perspective to the specific domain of engineering, and to the specific problem of collaboration at a distance. The thesis relies on work conducted at a number of sites. These include a major Swedish automotive company, distributed collaborative work between Luleå University of Technology, Stanford University, and the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, and studies undertaken with partner companies in the Polhem Laboratory. This work has evolved towards a focus on aspects of knowledge work and expertise sharing. The contribution of the thesis is to describe and analyse the ways in which ‘Know-Who’ and related concepts are significant features of face-to-face interaction in engineering environments, and thus how they present a challenge for effective distributed collaboration. I identify the ways in which ‘ready-to-hand’ knowledge of practices, knowledge of expertise, and trust in expertise are critical to successful collaboration in engineering work, and reflect upon ways in which these issues can be better integrated into approaches to technical support for this work.

  • 23. Larsson, Andreas
    Making sense of collaboration: the challenge of thinking together in global design teams2003In: Group '03: proceedings of the 2003 International ACM SIGGROUP conference on supporting group work / [ed] Mark Pendergast, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2003, p. 153-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industry globalization brings with it inevitable changes to traditional organizational structures. The notion of global virtual teams, working together across geographical, cultural and functional borders, is becoming increasingly appealing. This paper presents observations of how a team of designers negotiate shared understanding in the collaborative design of Virtual Pedals for Volvo Car Corporation. Although the team was globally distributed during most of the development process, examples are drawn from collocated design sessions, since this enables careful examination of the multifaceted ways in which collocated designers use a wide variety of artifacts and techniques to create common ground. The findings highlight the situational and interactional characteristics of design collaboration and suggest that the addition of shared 'objects to think with' in distributed design environments could greatly facilitate global design teams in their collaborative process of 'thinking together apart'.

  • 24. Larsson, Andreas
    Socio-technical aspects of distributed collaborative engineering2002Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of globalization, it is becoming increasingly important to take into account both advantages and disadvantages associated with world-wide product development efforts. While globalization means that costs and risks can be decreased, or shared in the case of collaborative projects, it also means that changes in traditional organizational structures are inevitable. The current trend is towards global virtual teams, in which collaboration proceeds across time as well as across geographical, cultural, and functional borders. Work in distributed design teams put demands on both physical and virtual environments that support these geographically dispersed groups with regard to collaboration, communication, and coordination. With longer distances between people, many of them with different responsibilities and activities within the organization, there is a clear need for the members of the organization to communicate efficiently in spite of the challenges that go with working in a geographically distributed work environment. Also, we must consider that engineering design is not a purely technical activity: it is also a highly social process. Technical artefacts are ultimately designed for human needs and purposes, and the design activities involve intense communication and interaction between individuals and groups in complex social settings. This thesis deals with socio-technical aspects of distributed collaborative engineering. The research presented in this thesis fundamentally aims to make investigations into the everyday work practice of engineers in order to better understand the social character of engineering design. Further, the research aims to establish a strong relation between these understandings of work practice and the design of appropriate, useful technology that supports and improves distributed collaborative engineering.

  • 25. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Larsson, Tobias
    Isaksson, Ola
    Bertoni, Marco
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Engineering 2.0: exploring lightweight technologies for the virtual enterprise2010In: From CSCW to Web 2.0: European Developments in Collaborative Design, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2010, p. 173-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a traditional business partnership, the partner companies are under contractual obligation to share data, information, and knowledge through one or several information systems that the leading firm decides. In such a case, the issue of sharing "whatever needs to be shared" is settled in contracts before any action is taken, however, also giving the implications that sharing expertise becomes a heavy and time-consuming activity. In turn, it can be argued that the heavy administration affects the lead time of product development negatively since the necessary input flows are delayed. In addition, the adaptation to certain predefined collaborative information systems is both expensive and resource-consuming (e.g., educating staff to use them). Also, the system might not be adaptable to the existing internal technology structure, causing a "translation" procedure, again taking up resources. Another structure for collaboration is a network or alliance of independent partner companies. One motivation for a network structure is that the partners can join or leave it more easily. A reason for joining and staying is an implicit sense of knowledge sharing (Tomkins 2001) and access to a "win-win" environment. Furthermore, the partners can be linked by information technology, i.e., forming a virtual ­structure rather than a physical one. The technologies provide the channels with additional knowledge. In a best-case scenario, a company would get access to a wide range of useful competences, and in a worst-case scenario the company would be drained of its core competences. Accordingly, at least two considerations for joining a partner network can be considered. First, the resources needed to couple the technologies have to be reasonable, due to the underpinning logic of going in and out of more than one network. Second, the company has to identify its knowledge base and evaluate the prospective gains and losses of sharing its expertise.

  • 26. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Ericson, Åsa
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Randall, Dave
    Manchester Metropolitan University.
    Engineering 2.0: exploring lightweight technologies for the virtual enterprise2008In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems, COOP 08: Carry-le-Rouet, Provence, France, May 20-23, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a Virtual Enterprise setting, it becomes increasingly important to make sure that knowledge and expertise created in one discipline, domain or company is correctly understood and quickly utilized by other actors throughout the value chain. This paper discusses why lightweight technology seems like a particularly promising concept in this context, and why Virtual Enterprises could benefit from learning more about tag clouds, mashups, wikis, and other ‘lightweight' technologies, as complements to the large-scale, arguably ‘heavyweight', product life-cycle management (PLM) systems of current practice. The paper draws on data from a number of product development projects - ranging from the development of manufacturing tools and industrial drive systems, to aircraft engines and armored terrain vehicles. The paper identifies both the kinds of problem typically experienced in the Virtual Enterprise, in relation to knowledge sharing, and explores ways in which lightweight technology might be adapted to solve them.

  • 27. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Grante, Christian
    Bylund, Nicklas
    Close long-term industrial collaboration: increasing the impact of engineering design research2003In: Proceedings: 7th International research expert conference, Trends in the development of machinery and associated technology, TMT 2003 / [ed] Joan Vivancos Calvet, Zenica: Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, St Cyril & Methodius University, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Bertoni, Marco
    Johansson, Christian
    Chirumalla, Koteshwar
    Project: CRESCENDO - Collaborative and Robust Engineering using Simulation Capability Enabling Next Design Optimisation2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The IMG4 project CRESCENDO addresses the Vision 2020 objectives for the aeronautical industry by contributing significantly to the fulfilment of three specific targets of the aeronautical industry’s Strategic Research Agenda. CRESCENDO will develop the foundations for the Behavioural Digital Aircraft (BDA),taking experience and results from VIVACE, and integrating these into a federative system and building the BDA on top of them. Main components of the BDA are: the Model Store, the Simulation Factory, the Quality Laboratory, and the Enterprise Collaboration Capabilities. It will be validated through use cases and test cases concerning “Power Plant Integration”, “Energy Aircraft”, “Thermal Aircraft” and “Value Generation” design problems and viewpoints during the preliminary design, detailed design, and test and certification phases of a generic aircraft product life-cycle. The BDA will become the new backbone for the simulation world, just as the Digital Mock-up (DMU) is today for the Product Life-cycle Management (PLM) world. This is considered a challenging area for research and innovation for the next decade. Hence, the CRESCENDO results will provide the aeronautics supply chain with the means to realistically manage and mature the virtual product in the extended/virtual enterprise with all of the requested functionality and components in each phase of the product engineering life cycle. CRESCENDO will make its approach available to the aeronautics supply chain via existing networks, information dissemination, training and technology transfer actions. The project will last three years and be organised into six subprojects: four technical and business-oriented subprojects, one “Enabling Capabilities” subproject which will deliver the BDA and a sixth subproject, responsible for consortium management and innovation issues. CRESCENDO will bring together 59 partners from industry, research institutes, universities and technology providers

  • 29. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bylund, Nicklas
    Isaksson, Ola
    Volvo Aero Corporation.
    Rethinking virtual teams for streamlined development2007In: Higher creativity for virtual teams: developing platforms for co-creation, Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, 2007, p. 138-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from experiences in automotive and aerospace development, the authors argue that it is time to radically progress our current understanding of how creativity could be introduced in organizations where factors like legal demands and contractual agreements severely restrict ‘outside-the-box' thinking, and where well-known creativity enablers such as trust, shared goals, and shared culture are becoming increasingly difficult to accomplish.

  • 30. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Isaksson, Ola
    Bylund, Nicklas
    Volvo Car Corporation.
    Rethinking virtual teams for streamlined development2008In: Virtual technologies: concepts, methodologies, tools, and applications, Hershey PA: Information Science Reference, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing from experiences in automotive and aerospace development, the authors argue that it is time to radically progress our current understanding of how creativity could be introduced in organizations where factors like legal demands and contractual agreements severely restrict ‘outside-the-box' thinking, and where well-known creativity enablers such as trust, shared goals, and shared culture are becoming increasingly difficult to accomplish.

  • 31. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Leifer, Larry
    Stanford University.
    Loos, Machiel Van der
    Stanford University.
    Feland, John
    Stanford University.
    Design for Wellbeing: Innovations for People2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Batyon: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing need for engineering designers to engage in creative activities that result in innovative products and technologies for the benefit of society. However, from an engineering perspective, issues of ‘life quality’ are currently heavily under-prioritized, particularly with regard to people with disabilities. This paper argues that both needs and solutions are now part of the designer’s responsibility, and that it is crucial to make a qualitative assessment of both the potential market impact and the ‘quality of life’ improvements afforded by innovations. Design for Wellbeing offers a perspective on life quality that goes beyond the traditional scope of assistive technology in that it aims to help people make a transformation from an actual state of being to a desired state of being – regardless of ability level.

  • 32. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Intranet - Luleå University of Technology2001Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Division of Computer Aided Design has been announced as one of ten winners in the Intranet Design Annual, published by web guru Jakob Nielsen at Nielsen/Norman Group. In competition with over 50 nominated organizations, the division's Intranet, developed by Andreas Larsson, Tobias Larsson and Peter Törlind, reached the top ten. Nielsen has been called the "guru of webpage usability" by the New York Times, and he currently holds 60 U.S. Patents, most of them concerning web usability. The report states: “It is also notable that Luleå University of Technology made it to the top 10, despite being designed by a bunch of graduate students. Though small and lacking a lot of resources, this design team focused relentlessly on user needs and on simplifying their design through many fast iterations. Some of the Luleå features underwent up to 50 iterations before they reached their current usability level. ‘I thought my initial design for the calendar application was really easy to use - in fact, I was quite proud of it,’ says one of the developers. But, the design didn’t hold up when professors and other staff members used it, so it was changed. User needs triumphed over the designer’s initial pride. That’s the hallmark of a truly great designer. On a small budget, the way to achieve high-quality design is through fast, cheap iterations and a willingness to do what users need.” http://www.useit.com/alertbox/intranet_design_2001.html http://www.nngroup.com/reports/intranet/2001/

  • 33. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    The Mobile intranet: managing people and information in a distributed organization2002In: WWDU 2002: Work with display units - world wide work : proceedings of the 6th International Scientific Conference on Work with Display Units, WWDU 2002 - World Wide Work, Berchtesgaden, May 22 - 25, 2002 / [ed] Holger Luczak, Berlin: Ergonomic, Inst. für Arbeits- und Sozialforschung , 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of the increasing globalisation of organizations, information systems must deal with issues of mobility. Longer distances between the members can lead to a knowledge gap, which means that two groups of people working in the same organization work according to completely different bases of information. Thus, there is a need for the members of an organization to communicate efficiently across geographical and departmental boundaries. The paper discusses motives, methods and experiences from the participatory design of a versatile Intranet application currently in use at the Division of Computer Aided Design, Luleå University of Technology in Sweden.

  • 34. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Design for versatility: the changing face of workspaces for collaborative design2005In: 15th International Conference on Engineering Design - ICED 05: 15 - 28 August 2005 / [ed] Andrew Samuel; William Lewis, Barton: Institution of Engineers, Australia , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fiercely competitive business climate, which is increasingly characterized by global alliances, partnerships and outsourcing agreements, companies struggle to decrease the negative impact of geographic distance on development efforts. The role of workspaces for collaborative design is gaining considerable attention, and there is currently an increasing interest in moving from individual tools or technologies to a more inclusive view of collaborative workspaces. This paper reports on the underlying motivation and justification for a new collaborative design studio at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. The studio provides a rapid-response environment, in which the significance of issues raised through ethnographic observations of engineering work can be evaluated and solutions offered.

  • 35. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Mabogunje, A.
    Leifer, L.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Elfström, Bengt-Olof
    Distributed team innovation: a framework for distributed product development2003In: Research for practice - innovation in products, processes and organisations: ICED 03, 14th International Conference on Engineering Design ; 19 - 21 August 2003, The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm / organized by the Royal Institute of Technology / [ed] Anders Folkeson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2003, p. 321-322Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. Larsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Mabogunje, Ade
    Stanford University.
    Milne, Andrew
    Stanford University.
    Distributed design teams: embedded one-on-one conversations in one-to-many2002In: Proceedings of the Design Research Society International Conference at Brunel University / [ed] David Durling; John Shackleton, Staffordshire University Press , 2002, p. 604-614Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering design is fundamentally social, requiring a lot of interaction and communication between the people involved. Additionally, good design often relies upon the ability of a cross-functional team to create a shared understanding of the task, the process and the respective roles of its members. The negotiation and bargaining for common ground are essential in the design process. It is important to provide tools and methods so that also geographically distributed design teams are given the opportunity to engage in such social interactions. This paper presents a study of interpersonal communication within the Distributed Team Innovation (DTI) framework; a joint product design project between Luleå University of Technology and Stanford University that investigates the future of collaborative product development. The common object of work is to design "Virtual Pedals" for Volvo Car Corporation.In the study, we noticed that one-on-one conversations, held in parallel to a main discussion, were common in co-located teamwork and that they are a natural part of creative teamwork. These conversations were mainly used to clarify things and to discuss vague ideas or personal disagreements. Additionally, they were often used instead of, or as a precursor to, bringing up a topic with the whole group. In distributed meetings side conversations were discouraged and current systems for distributed collaboration could not provide sufficient support for these subtle interactions. This has important implications for supporting and improving the performance of global teams, and it suggests that the one-to-many channel of today's video conferencing technology is severely limiting.

  • 37.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Design for wellbeing2008In: The Engineering Handbook of Smart Technology for Aging, Disability and Independence, Hoboken, N.J: John Wiley & Sons, 2008, p. 819-832Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Web-based multibody dynamics using distributed simulation modules2002In: Proceedings: CIRP Design Seminar : 16 - 18 May 2002, [Hong Kong] /, Hong Kong, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From being a specialized tool, used in only a few of the design stages, modeling and simulation has become a strategically and competitive tool the global manufacturing firm can’t do without in order to perform world class product development. Simulations have grown from being small isolated models treated at one geographic place to be multidisciplinary and incorporating whole product structures. This means that information, i.e. simulation models, might be located at departments across the entire organization, hence in the global organization across the world and the efforts to perform simulations will be complicated. A method, or tool, that use the Internet for sharing and incorporating modular Simulation models, within the framework of multibody dynamics, is proposed and developed in this work.

  • 39. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Johansson, Christian
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    PROJEKTSAMMANFATTNINGPIEp, Product Innovation Engineering Program är ett nationellt program som syftar till att stärka förmågan till innovativ produkt- och affärsutveckling. PIEp spänner över fältet från teori till praktik, från forskning om innovationssystem till proaktivt arbete för att stärka innovationskraft och därigenom uppnå en systemförändring inom forskning, utbildning och utveckling. PIEp skall pågå under tio år, 2007-2016 och engagera flera av Sveriges lärosäten och forskningsinstitut involverade i innovation och produktutveckling. PIEp leds och administreras vid KTH i partnerskap med Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Jönköping, Designhögskolan vid Umeå Universitet, Centrum för Teknik, Medicin och Hälsa, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, samt en rad företag och organisationer.

  • 40. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Johansson, Christian
    Isaksson, Ola
    Project: VIVACE - Value Improvement Through a Virtual Aeronautical Collaborative Enterprise2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    VIVACE is an Aeronautical Collaborative Design Environment with associated Processes, Models and Methods. This environment will help to design an aircraft and its engines as a whole, providing to the aeronautics supply chain in an extended enterprise, virtual products with all requested functionality and components in each phase of the product engineering life cycle

  • 41.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    A modular approach to web based multibody dynamic simulation2001In: International CIRP Design Seminar: design in the new economy : design theory, methodology and its integration with computational tools to support teams of competence - the road to wealth : 6 - 8 June, 2001 at KTH Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm: Kungl. Tekniska Högskolan , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer-based tools for modelling and simulation have changed the best practise of product development. Simulation of mechanical dynamic systems have a large potential in product development but are only partly used today due to, for example, modelling complexity. A method, or tool, that supports distribution of multibody dynamic analysis models, in a modular way, is proposed and developed. Ethnographic methods have been used as a means for gaining an understanding of the engineering analysis work practice. The tool incorporates the engineering simulation packages ADAMS and MATLAB in a web based environment, and allows distributed multibody dynamic simulation in product development.

  • 42.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Distributed multibody dynamic analysis within product development2001In: Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, 2001, p. 501-507Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method that supports distribution of multibody dynamic analysis is proposed and developed. Ethnographic methods are used as a means for gaining a deeper understanding of the engineering analysis work practice, and the findings form the base for a cooperative design of the system. The concept of design rationale is applied in order to deal with current problems of engineering analysis, such as irrelevant input and output, as well as satisfying the need for useful, real-time feedback. The web based simulation environment, applied to vehicle system dynamics, contains the simulation packages ADAMS and MATLAB and incorporates database technology. The possibility to distribute simulation models and results, from simulation experts to design experts and engineers, as well as subcontractors, is created. The proposed method requires changes in the existing multibody dynamic simulation methodology regarding aspects of incorporation in product development theories

  • 43.
    Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Kassfeldt, Elisabet
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Innovations for Life: Design for Wellbeing2005In: First International Conference on Lifestyle, Health and Technology: June 1-3, 2005 at Luleå University of Technology, Porsön, Luleå, Sweden, Luleå, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Bertoni, Marco
    Isaksson, Ola
    Kalhori, Vahid
    Sandvik Coromant, Sverige.
    Kårdén, Håkan
    Eurostep, Sverige.
    Svanerudh, Patrik
    Designtech, Sverige.
    Project: ProViking THINK - Team för Heterogen Innovationskunskap2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Begreppet product-service systems (PSS), eller funktionella produkter, förutspås ha betydande påverkan för ett framtida hållbart samhälle. Ett PSS-synsätt kommer att förändra hur produkter och tjänster används, men också förändra tillvägagångssättet i utvecklingen, eftersom ansvaret för den fysiska produkten genom hela dess livscykel kvarstår hos företaget eller konsortiet som utvecklar PSS-lösningen. I och med detta kan aktiviteterna med omkonstruktion, återanvändning och återvinning, utföras på ett totalt annorlunda sätt än i dag. I den här situationen blir kapaciteten att ständigt förbättra kundupplevt värde genom nya lösningar en viktig förmåga. Således står utvecklingsteam idag inför två stora utmaningar; dels ska de kunna hantera mer abstrakta kundbehov, dels ska de på ett effektivt sätt ständigt bidra till nya lösningar. Det här projektets mål är att stödja PSS-utvecklingsteamets innovationsprocess genom att föreslå faciliterande metoder och verktyg. Specifikt fokus ligger på följande aspekter för att bidra till utvecklingen av en sammanhängande metodologi för team-baserad innovation:- Identifiering, analys och kommunikation av kundbehov samt modellering av värde- Tvärfunktionella team- Effektiv kunskapsdelning- Modellering och visualisering av lösningar baserat på ett kunskapslivscykel perspektiv Projektet kommer att vara en gemensam prestation av industri- och akademirepresentanter. Det praktiska arbetet kommer att utföras i ett nära samarbete. I stort vägleds projektet av antagandet att – visualisering av affärs- och utvecklingsrelaterad kunskap samt snabba modellerings- och simuleringsmöjligheter i tidiga faser stödjer PSS-teamets förmåga att finna nya lösningar och genomföra hållbar utveckling. Förutom ökad kunskap om strategier och tillvägagångssätt för team-baserad innovation kommer demonstratorer av verktyg och metoder vara ett resultat av projektarbetet.

  • 45. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Löfstrand, Magnus
    Larsson, Andreas
    Project: Service Concept Design - NFFP2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The project aim at strengthen the aerospace industry competence within Functional Product Development. The approach is activity based modelling, simulation and visualization of hardware based services in the cocnept phase of the product development process.

  • 46.
    Leifer, Larry
    et al.
    Stanford University.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Larsson, Tobias
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Loos, Machiel Van der
    Stanford University.
    Feland, John
    Stanford University.
    Design for wellbeing: innovations for people2005In: Human Centered Design: Maruzen for 10th anniversary of the Kanto Branch, Japanese Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing need for engineering designers to engage in creative activities that result in innovative products and technologies for the benefit of society. However, from an engineering perspective, issues of ‘life quality’ are currently heavily under-prioritized, particularly with regard to people with disabilities. This paper argues that both needs and solutions are now part of the designer’s responsibility, and that it is crucial to make a qualitative assessment of both the potential market impact and the ‘quality of life’ improvements afforded by innovations. Design for Wellbeing offers a perspective on life quality that goes beyond the traditional scope of assistive technology in that it aims to help people make a transformation from an actual state of being to a desired state of being – regardless of ability level.

  • 47.
    Olsson, Annika
    et al.
    Lund University, Division of Packaging Logistics.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Value creation in PSS design through product and packaging innovation processes2009In: Introduction to Product/Service-System Design, London: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2009, p. 93-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer packaging has become increasingly important as a valueadding element, since packages shape the consumer's experience of the product during use, as well as accelerating the purchase decision. From a Product/Service-System (PSS) perspective, the strategic benefits of viewing packaging as a central value carrier are evident. To consumers, the product and its packaging are often perceived as closely integrated and consumers' initial impression of the quality and value of a product is sometimes determined by their judgment of the package. Therefore, the product, the package and its integrated benefits and features can be regarded as one product/package/service system. However, product developers tend to over-emphasize the value of the functional properties related to the 'core product', overlooking the differentiating benefits that might come from the integration of product and packaging innovation processes. The move towards developing integrated product/service offerings, rather than traditional artefact based products, implies that the role of packaging needs to be reconsidered in light of, e.g., total life-cycle provisions and environmentally sustainable offerings. This chapter reviews previous research on the integration between product and packaging development, and highlights some important challenges and opportunities related to improved value creation in the product/service system paradigm.

  • 48.
    Redon, Romaric
    et al.
    EADS Innovation Works.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Leblond, Richard
    EADS Innovation Works.
    Longueville, Barthelemy
    EADS Innovation Works.
    VIVACE Context based search platform2007In: Modeling and using context: 6th international and interdisciplinary conference, CONTEXT 2007, Roskilde, Denmark, August 20-24, 2007 ; proceedings / [ed] Boicho Kokinov; Daniel C. Richardson; Thomas R. Roth-Berghofer; Laure Vieu, Berlin: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology/Springer Verlag, 2007, p. 397-410Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key challenges of knowledge management is to provide the right knowledge to the right person at the right time. To face this challenge, a context based search platform was developed in the frame of the European Integrated Project VIVACE. This platform is based on the identification of a user context and the subsequent pushing of applicable knowledge to that particular user. We introduce a context model to represent the user’s context. This context model is used to describe the context of an engineer working in a specific company. Further, we developed means to index available knowledge based on company engineering context and means to search for knowledge applicable to the user’s context. Since it is not always possible to describe in which context the knowledge assets should be applied, we added learning capabilities which enable the system to learn the applicability of specific knowledge to a user’s context based on user feedback.

  • 49.
    Thakur, Aruna
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Gao, Chaunsi
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Parnes, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    The effects of frame-rate and image quality on perceived video quality in videoconferencing2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report discusses the effect of frame-rate and image quality on the perceived video quality in a specific videoconferencing application (MarratechPro). Subjects with various videoconferencing experiences took part in four experiments wherein they gave their opinions on the quality of video upon the variations in frame-rate and image quality. The results of the experiments showed that the subjects preferred high frame rate over high image quality, under the condition of limited bandwidth.

  • 50.
    Törlind, Peter
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Re-experiencing engineering meetings: knowledge reuse challenges from virtual meetings2006In: Challenges in collaborative engineering: CCE '06 ; state of the art and future challenges in collaborative design ; proceedings of the international workshop, April 19 - 20 2006, Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with DDECS '06 / [ed] Leandro Soares Indrusiak, Gliwice: Interprint , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 54
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf