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  • 1.
    Andersson, Mattias
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Berglund, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Wikberg-Nilsson, Åsa
    Alias: ytmodellering, animering & visualisering2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Berglund, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Tretten, Phillip
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    A systematic self-assessment tool2012In: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education for Future Wellbeing, EPDE 2012, 2012, p. 311-316Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bologna Process has led to fundamental changes in the way students are taught. This in turn has led to new quality assurance systems for teaching. For good outcomes to occur both the teachers and students need to be aware of the intended learning outcome (ILO) and this is made clearer by well defined Teacher/Learner Activities (TLAs). The Systematic Grading Procedure (SGP) has been shown to assist teachers grading student’s 3D-image work, fulfilling a need for assistance in subjects requiring grading of subjective nature. With the application of this method have both teachers and students been given a tool that helps them better understand the grading process and the level of importance of different parts of the 3D work. The aim of this study was to assess students’ learning outcomes. The SGP was used and compared by both teachers and students in assessing their own work. This study used four students who were introduced to the SGP at the introduction of the course. This was done to give then an idea how they are to understand the ILOs. After one of their assignments was graded the students were given an opportunity to improve their work using the SPG. Three of the four choose to improve their work. The ensuing interview and results showed that the SGP could be used as a tool to help students and teachers with the ILO and TLAs. In addition to that the SGP should further be tested for verification.

  • 3.
    Ericson, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Öhrling, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Revisiting prototyping: learning in early design2012In: Proceedings of the the 12th International Design Conference, DESIGN 2012: May 21-24 2012, Dubrovnik, Croatia / [ed] Dorian Marjanovic; Mario Storga; Neven Pavkovic; Nevad Bojcetic, Design Research Society, 2012, p. 2045-2052Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vision for manufacturing firms to provide more services certainly include more intangible and tacit parameters for engineers to handle. Hence, the early development stages describe a learning process where knowledge and solution progress in parallel.

  • 4.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Industrial design: rapid tooling for small and medium sized enterprises2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis combines three different topics, the small business environment, industrial design and rapid tooling. Smaller companies often suffer from lack of resources in many ways and since most theoretical product development methods are formulated for larger companies, this is a problem. The possibility to design and give their products the desired form is therefore difficult. Rapid tooling is a new way of producing forming tools that cut the cost and lead time compared to conventional tooling methods. The aim of this thesis is to investigate and clarify if Rapid tooling is a solution to the problem of using forming tools in smaller companies. These tools can be used both as early prototype tools to verify a design and make a basis for decision of acquiring conventional tools for long production series, and as production tools for shorter production series. Paper A explains the initial problem formulation and the combining of the three topics. Also a small case study is included to help clarifying the aim to find a way for smaller companies to use forming tools that are adapted to their specific situation. Paper B focuses on the implementation of Rapid Tooling methods in smaller companies and whether to make the tools in-house with an own RT-machine, or buy the service externally from a service provider. Paper C deals with the question of how to choose the right RT-method for your specific situation. Each RT-method has its own advantages as well as disadvantages and are more suited for certain types of applications. It is therefore important to choose the right RT-method that is best for your product and what kind of tool you need. The thesis is concluded with plans for further research.

  • 5.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rapid tooling for small and medium sized enterprises: Part 2: implementing rapid tooling in small companies2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Abrahamsson, Lena
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Kaplan, Alexander
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Engström, Hans
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Määttä, Antti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäntyjärvi, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Barriers to implementation of laser welding technology: A study of 11 companies in Scandinavia2015In: Manufacturing Science and Technology, ISSN 2333-2735, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holmqvist, Bengt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Cross-Fertilization of Courses to Improve Student Learning2016In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education: Collaboration and Cross-Disciplinarity / [ed] Erik Bohemia, Lyndon Buck, Kaare Eriksen, Ahmed Kovacevic, Nis Ovesen, Christian Tollestrup, Glasgow: The Design Society, 2016, p. 626-631Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching is an area that should be in a constant ongoing development or should at least be a processquestioned and revised according to the fact that the society, the students and new knowledge aboutteaching methods are not static. Whether teaching needs to change in terms of how it can enhancestudent learning opportunities must always be subject to an ongoing process. This article describes thisneed and how changes are made to improve students learning in one of the courses in the IndustrialDesign engineering program. The set up in a program like this is a compromise between two differentprofessions as in this case between mechanical engineers and industrial designers. This is a challengethat is tainted with some problems. One of these problems is to accommodate both professions in thesame application. These compromises are never optimal solutions and this have the result that somesubjects have to disappear or be minimized from each profession. Traditionally design trainingprograms contains more of hands on education than machine engineering programs and students inindustrial Design programs are also expected to have some basic knowledge already when applyingwhen applying to their educational program. Some examples of hands on courses as Model makingand sketching cannot be studied only as theory, skills in this case needs training and also timeprovided to allow the knowledge to mature. This article describes an attempt to improve this twoprofession trade-off and how to improve learning in both practical skills and theoretical skills by anew course design. The article also shows how this example could be of interest for other programsand other courses.

  • 8.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holmqvist, Bengt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Managing multidisciplinarity: growing future creators2013In: Design Education - Growing our Future: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Enginnering & Product Design Education, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2013, p. 587-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparing students for real life is a main issue for education programs. At Luleå University of Technology, (LTU), this is done by a range of different course layouts and course assignments. Students studying at the Industrial Design Engineering program practice this as group work, workshops and individual assignments always based on the intention to be as close to what students will face after exam in their first employments. Yet there is a major problem with this. Assignments are still not sharp and students know the worst outcome would be to not pass. This paper describes a project assignment connected to an international competition and on a complexity level that needs competences from several different university programs. The project is a competition, which is a successful way to increase focus, commitment and reaching a higher level of result. In this project students have to form their own project organization, plan and distribute work. This is very close to how they are going to act in their future profession and how they have to interact with other professions in the real life situation. Interaction with other programs sometimes occurs but in this project the interaction is on a much higher level because of the complexity and the intensity that is the effect of a competition. Being a part of a bigger project organization gives experiences in collaborating as handling personal problems and people acting unexpected with other competences. Successful competitions results create attention good for students, teachers and the university.

  • 9.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holmqvist, Bengt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Stimulate student business outcome through needfinding-oriented projects2011In: Design education for creativity and business innovation: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education / [ed] Ahmed Kovacevic, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2011, p. 391-396Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the department of Human Work Sciences at Luleå University of Technology, LTU, there is a long tradition of working in student driven product development projects in cooperation with companies in the industry. The main structure of these projects is to develop assignments together with the companies and let the students address these problems during the projects. This leads to stimulating and real tasks where the students are very committed. However, the tasks are relatively well defined and are more like consultant assignments where the students act like the consultants and work directly with the companies’ problems. The ambition was to increase the element of innovation and entrepreneurship and through that increase the ambition and conditions for starting new companies. To achieve this, need finding methodology based on Patnaik and Becker was introduced in order to give the students a tool to work with more loosely defined tasks. The projects where not defined more than as a few different scenarios where the students were requested to identify needs and from that develop a product or service to satisfy these needs. From the need finding, the use of scenarios and personas the outcome was a number of unique and innovative solutions. The students experienced the new approach as scary at first but gradually started to appreciate it as long as the project proceeded. The course assessment showed that the new way of addressing problems when developing products filled a gap in the methodology package for the students. However, even though the outcome showed a successful result regarding innovativeness the projects ended without being implemented as products on the market. This step seemed to be too much to overcome. According to that an additional aspect was introduced the third time the course was given. From the start the projects were carried out without cooperation with the industry in any way but this time a company committing them selves to buy and produce the best solution was involved. The company introduced in the course provides gifts and profile products to other companies and organizations. This means they have a great number of different products in their collection. The student project groups task was to find and create a new suitable product to offer them. The class of students was divided into groups of four and they all worked with the same assignment in competition with each other. The outcome of this project was a great number of different solutions depending on which target group the students had chosen to focus on and which needs were identified. The result from, the need finding were, in the cases when it was an advantage, prototyped in the rapid prototyping equipment which is a way to make models of high quality close to production ready designs. In the end, several solutions were chosen for production by the company. All in all, this approach turned out to greatly stimulate an entrepreneurial approach and further develop the students’ ability for innovative thinking. The use of need finding-based projects in a strong competitive situation is useful for the students. To focus more towards entrepreneurship and innovation proved to stimulate start-up of new companies and it can also show the students that a self-employed future is realistic.

  • 10.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holmqvist, Bengt
    University-industry cooperation and student driven projects: a model for educating design engineers2010In: When Design Education and Design Research Meet: proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, Norwegian University ofScience and Technology (NTNU) Trondheim, Norway, 2nd-3rd September 2010 / [ed] Casper Boks; William Ion; Chris McMahon; Brian Parkinson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2010, p. 414-419Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperating with industry to create "real life" projects for students is a 30 year old tradition at the Department of Human Work Sciences at Luleå University of Technology (LTU). This paper describes the approach to university-industry projects at LTU, illustrates benefits and problems in the interaction between students, industry and the university. The students´ practice their abilities in product design and project management. This is also a confirmation of the demand for their education in the industry. By being able to practice their future profession strengthens the student's confidence and gives them a feeling of being competent. During the project the students are given good opportunities to start building their professional network. The projects also act as key features in their CVs and portfolios. These projects serve as a display window for the MSc program Industrial Design Engineering at the Department of Human Work Sciences when recruiting new students as well as for marketing the design engineers to the industry. When employed in the industry, design engineers from LTU often hold key positions where they are excellent contacts for establishing new collaboration. Often these former students contact the university with proposals for cooperation. During the years, many student projects have developed into collaborative research projects. In this way we have created a self generating mechanism where new collaboration is created with former students who themselves have worked in these kinds of projects during their own education. A win-win-win situation is created where university, industry and students all benefit from this.

  • 11.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lundberg, Jan
    A Systematic Evaluation of RT Methods for SME:s2004In: Time-compression technologies, Europe : the magazine for fast and efficient design engineering teams, ISSN 1467-1360, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Lundberg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Use of external facilitator to choose optimal Rapid Tooling method: A case study2013In: High Value Manufacturing: Advanced research in virtual and rapid prototyping, Leiden: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group , 2013, p. 379-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of an external expert, called facilitator in this study, can assist a company with little previous knowledge within the field of Rapid Prototyping, called RP in this study, first to determine if they would benefit from RP and if so, find which components that are suitable for RP, and second to find the optimum RP method and RP service bureau. Design/methodology/approach - The study was made as action research, where the researcher actively participated in the project acting as the facilitator. The company involved had a clear ambition to make their prototyping more effective and wanted to know if RP could be useful in this ambition. Findings - The results show that the facilitator's assistance was useful to the company. Within two weeks, a component was selected, a suitable RP method was found and a RP service bureau was contacted. Without this extra expertise, the company could have difficulties identifying the internal needs, the demands to put to the RP method and to choose suitable method and contractor. By acting in the company's interest, the facilitator ensures an objective selection of RP method and that it is optimized for the current situation. Originality/value - This study is not on finding a new method for selecting the best RP method. The main objective for this study is to find a way to make these selection methods, and also the RP technology, available to companies new to the technology while the company's interest is kept in focus.

  • 13.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Nergård, Henrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Discussing the role of the physical model in intra-cognitive communication2012In: Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE International Conference of Cognitive Infocommunications: CogInfoCom 2012, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Communications Society, 2012, p. 505-509Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In industry today, many different tools and methods using 3D technology are used to create virtual prototypes or products. These tools are excellent for their purpose and offer great possibilities. However, even using these tools, some things are hard to transfer and examine within them. This paper gives you two examples of cases where organic objects are used as an original and then transferred into the digital world. Physical prototypes were used in both cases and the paper explains what they added in addition to the digital 3D-models.

  • 14.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Nergård, Henrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Alm, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Communicating the realization process during technology implementation2015In: International Journal of Intelligent Decision Technologies, ISSN 1872-4981, E-ISSN 1875-8843, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology implies improved efficiency. This potential is not always realized. It has been observed that implementation of new technology within Small and Medium-sized Enterprises, (SMEs), is not as widely spread as it could be. There are several likely grounds for this, e.g. difficulties to keep up to date on the latest technology, financial grounds due to expensive technology and uncertainty regarding what gain one would get from the new technology. Looking at technology implementation, a major part of the failed implementation attempts are caused by non-technological reasons, such as organizational and human reasons. Visualizing the expected result and also the implementation process to the SME prior to the actual implementation, the communication is much more direct and the actions the SME has to perform before, during and after the implementation is made clear. When implementing new technology, the information process is crucial. This paper discusses the value of communicating the entire process and the results thereof when evaluating a technology for eventual implementation. The results is viewed in two ways, first the realization of the products whether they meet the needs of the companies or not, second the actual realization process is developed and analysed to suit each company.

  • 15.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Rantatalo, Matti
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Operation, Maintenance and Acoustics.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala universitet.
    Patient specific biomodel of the whole aorta: the importance of calcified plaque removal2011In: VASA, ISSN 0301-1526, E-ISSN 1664-2872, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of anatomical models produced by 3D printing technique (rapid prototyping, RP) is gaining increased acceptance as a complementary tool for planning complex surgical interventions. This paper describes a method for creating a patient specific replica of the whole aorta. Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) DICOM-data was converted to a three-dimensional computer aided design-model (CAD) of the inner wall of the aorta representing the lumen where the calcified plaque contribution was removed in a multi-step editing-manoeuvre. The edited CAD-model was used for creating a physical plaster model of the true lumen in a 3D-printer. Elastic and transparent silicon was applied onto the plaster model, which was then removed leaving a silicon replica of the aorta. Results: The median (interquartile range) difference between diameters obtained from CTA- and RP plaster-model at 19 predefined locations was 0.5 mm (1 mm) which corresponds to a relative median difference of 4.6% (7.0%). The average wall thickness of the silicone model was 3.5 mm. The elasticity property and performance during intervention was good with an acceptable transparency. Conclusions: The integration of RP-techniques with CAD based reconstruction of 3D-medical imaging data provides the needed tools for making a truly patient specific replica of the whole aorta with high accuracy. Plaque removal postprocessing is necessary to obtain a true inner wall configuration.

  • 16.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Stenberg, Magnus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Öhrling, Daniel
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Visualising Workplace Design2015In: Great Expectations: Design Teaching, Research & Enterprise: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education (E&PDE15) / [ed] Ahmed Kovacevic ; Guy Bingham; Brian Parkinsson, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2015, p. 150-155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is a learning process and the use of prototyping activities for the sake of learning increases thedesign thinking, i.e. the dialogue and feedback on ideas. Hence, representations ranging from sketchesto different kind of models and animations are recommended to be used as prototypes to mediate userneeds and to support communication within the team. Low-fidelity prototyping enables rapidvisualisation of ideas, reframes failures into learning, generates perceptual progress and supportscreativity. In product design, different visualisation techniques are used to generate and communicateideas since thinking visually is seen as necessary for innovation.This paper describes the work of developing a course where you combine the task of workplace designwith traditional industrial design visualisation methods like sketching, model making and 3Dcomputer aids. By using the knowledge and experience from product design and incorporate it intoworkplace design, a process where all parties contribute in new ways could be achieved.In the course the students start by performing an individual investigation of the present research frontfor production visualisation by summarizing and analysing a number of scientific articles. A workplace design project was then performed where exploratory, explanatory and persuasive visualizingtechniques were implemented. Through a creative and constructive collaboration across disciplinaryboundaries, Industrial Production Environment and Industrial Design, we have created andimplemented a course in an area that has been lacking in our Master Program.

  • 17.
    Håkansson, Anders
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Enhancing Student motivation: "raise the bar"2014In: Design education & human technology relations: proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands 4th - 5th September 2014 / [ed] Erik Bohemia; Arthur Eger; Wouter Eggink, Glasgow: Design Research Society, 2014, p. 414-419Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quest for enhancing student motivation, commitment and performance in higher education is anever-present struggle for university teachers. Of course, the hunt for a good grade is something that isvery central for students, but as a teacher you would like to reach further and find a deeper, morepersonal motivation within each student. A hypothesis that was investigated was that students willaccept high demands if they are clearly defined and presented directly in the beginning instead ofbeing introduced gradually during the course. In the present course, a team of six teachers was puttogether in order to be able to handle the students’ need for coaching and support. The course includedmultiple sub-deadlines concluded by status presentations, called Design Reviews, where the groupsupdated the teaching team and other groups on the project’s progress. The Design Reviews includedboth an oral presentation of five minutes and a written memorandum, called PM. Each student wasresponsible for one oral presentation and one PM. Examination of the course was based on the finalproject result as well as on performance during the Design Reviews. The conclusions from thisapproach are that the general motivation was increased. The project results were very good andincluded several innovative solutions. Student reaction to the high demands was positive but teachercoaching is a very important factor for keeping this on a manageable and stimulating level for thestudents and preventing it from being an oppressive stress factor.

  • 18.
    Kaplan, Alexander
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Product and Production Development.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Engström, Hans
    Projekt: Forum för Industriell Framtid2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    För att uppnå det övergripande målet att skapa en internationellt konkurrenskraftig regional tillverkningsindustri har projektet följande mål: • Genomföra ett antal högkvalitativa seminarier där experter möter små eller medelstora svenska och finska företag. Seminarierna ska resultera i en ”Agenda för industriell framtid” • Implementera ett antal demonstranter (svetsning) där man kan utveckla och träna operatörer, utveckla nya organisationsformer, testa olika styrsystem, samordna demonstratorer i nätverk och ett antal andra aktiviteter som utvecklats inom ”Agenda för industriell framtid” • Genomföra 20 handlingsprogram (ett för varje företag) där man försöker realisera agendan i anslutning till den etablerade demonstratorn. Målsättningen är att förbättra det ekonomiska omsättningen med 15 % samtidigt som man förbättrar miljön med 15 %. • Arrangera ett internationellt slutseminarium Projektets vision är att regionens tillverkningsindustri kan ses som en av de mest avancerade SME-kulturerna i världen. Baserat på avancerad hög-teknologi lyckas man utveckla innovativa produkter i världsklass, samtidigt som man värnar om ekologisk hållbarhet. Metoder för jämställdhet, som bidrar till att bryta den sneda könsfördelningen inom industrin, har utvecklats. Företagen är konkurrenskraftiga och genererar såväl höga intäkter som en stabilt växande arbetsmarknad.

  • 19. Larsson, Tobias
    et al.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Ericson, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Törlind, Peter
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Bergström, Mattias
    Luleå University of Technology, External, LTU Business AB.
    Johansson, Christian
    Johansson, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Wenngren, Johan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Computer Science.
    Ylinenpää, Håkan
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Parida, Vinit
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Project: PIEp - Product Innovation Engineering Programme2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    PROJEKTSAMMANFATTNINGPIEp, Product Innovation Engineering Program är ett nationellt program som syftar till att stärka förmågan till innovativ produkt- och affärsutveckling. PIEp spänner över fältet från teori till praktik, från forskning om innovationssystem till proaktivt arbete för att stärka innovationskraft och därigenom uppnå en systemförändring inom forskning, utbildning och utveckling. PIEp skall pågå under tio år, 2007-2016 och engagera flera av Sveriges lärosäten och forskningsinstitut involverade i innovation och produktutveckling. PIEp leds och administreras vid KTH i partnerskap med Lunds Tekniska Högskola, Högskolan i Jönköping, Designhögskolan vid Umeå Universitet, Centrum för Teknik, Medicin och Hälsa, Luleå Tekniska Universitet, samt en rad företag och organisationer.

  • 20.
    Öhrling, Daniel
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Holmqvist, Bengt
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    Håkansson, Anders
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Innovation and Design.
    The creative engineer: sketching for dummies2012In: Design education for future wellbeing: Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Enginnering & Product Design Education, Design Research Society, 2012, p. 451-456Conference paper (Refereed)
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