Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergstrom, Jan
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andreewitch, Sergej
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Andersson, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial2010In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 10, p. article 54-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet- and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia) in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the study was to establish the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods: Patients referred for treatment by their physician, or self-referred, were telephone-screened by a psychiatric nurse. Patients fulfilling screening criteria underwent an in-person structured clinical interview carried out by a psychiatrist. A total of 113 consecutive patients were then randomly assigned to 10 weeks of either guided Internet delivered CBT (n = 53) or group CBT (n = 60). After treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up, patients were again assessed by the psychiatrist, blind to treatment condition. Results: Immediately after randomization 9 patients dropped out, leaving 104 patients who started treatment. Patients in both treatment conditions showed significant improvement on the main outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) after treatment. For the Internet treatment the within-group effect size (pre-post) on the PDSS was Cohen's d = 1.73, and for the group treatment it was d = 1.63. Between group effect sizes were low and treatment effects were maintained at 6-months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the two treatment conditions using a mixed models approach to account for missing data. Group CBT utilised considerably more therapist time than did Internet CBT. Defining effect as proportion of PDSS responders, the cost-effectiveness analysis concerning therapist time showed that Internet treatment had superior cost-effectiveness ratios in relation to group treatment both at post-treatment and follow-up. Conclusions: This study provides support for the effectiveness of Internet CBT in a psychiatric setting for patients with panic disorder, and suggests that it is equally effective as the more widely used group administered CBT in reducing panic-and agoraphobic symptoms, as well as being more cost effective with respect to therapist time.

  • 2. Bergström, J
    et al.
    Andersson, G
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Andreevitch, S
    Ruck, C
    Carlbring, P
    Lindefors, N
    An open study of the effectiveness of Internet treatment for panic disorder delivered in a psychiatric setting2009In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Panic Disorder with or without or without agoraphobia (PD/A) is common and can be treated effectively with SSRI medication or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). There is however a great lack of access to CBT services, which has motivated the development of self-help approaches requiring less therapist contact. A novel treatment modality in this field, showing efficacy in several randomised trials but until now not evaluated within the context of regular psychiatric care, is Internet-based treatment. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of Internet-based CBT for 20 consecutively referred PD patients in a psychiatric setting. At post-treatment, 94% of patients no longer met DSM-IV criteria for PD (82% at 6-month follow up). The within-group effect sizes (for the main outcome PDSS; Panic Disorder Severity Scale) were Cohens d=2.5 (pre- to posttreatment) and 2.8 (pre-treatment to follow up) respectively. The proportion of responders on the PDSS was 75% at posttreatment and 70% at 6-month follow up. These results indicate that Internet-based CBT can be both an effective, feasible and potentially cost-effective alternative within regular psychiatric care for patients with PD.

  • 3. Carlsson, Katrin
    et al.
    Petersson, Karl Magnus
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Öhman, Arne
    Fear and the Amygdala: Manipulation of Awareness Generates Differential Cerebral Responses to Phobic and Fear-Relevant (but Nonfeared) Stimuli2004In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 340-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid response to danger holds an evolutionary advantage. In this positron emission tomography study, phobics were exposed to masked visual stimuli with timings that either allowed awareness or not of either phobic, fear-relevant (e.g., spiders to snake phobics), or neutral images. When the timing did not permit awareness, the amygdala responded to both phobic and fear-relevant stimuli. With time for more elaborate processing, phobic stimuli resulted in an addition of an affective processing network to the amygdala activity, whereas no activity was found in response to fear-relevant stimuli. Also, right prefrontal areas appeared deactivated, comparing aware phobic and fear-relevant conditions. Thus, a shift from top-down control to an affectively driven system optimized for speed was observed in phobic relative to fear-relevant aware processing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

  • 4.
    Costa, Diogo
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindert, Jutta
    Department of Public Health, Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Hatzidimitriadou, Eleni
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, Olga
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ioannidi-Kapolo, Ellisabeth
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Degomme, Oliver
    International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Cervilla, Jorge
    Departmental Section of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Barros, Henrique
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Intimate partner violence in Europe: design and methods of a multinational study.: La violencia de pareja en Europa: diseño y métodos de un estudio multinacional2013In: Gaceta Sanitaria, ISSN 0213-9111, E-ISSN 1578-1283, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 558-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To describe the design, methods, procedures and characteristics of the population involved in a study designed to compare Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in eight European countries.

    Methods Women and men aged 18–65, living in Ghent-Belgium (n = 245), Stuttgart-Germany (n = 546), Athens-Greece (n = 548), Budapest-Hungary (n = 604), Porto-Portugal (n = 635), Granada-Spain (n = 138), Östersund-Sweden (n = 592), London-United Kingdom (n = 571), were sampled and administered a common questionnaire. Chi-square goodness of fit and five-age strata population fractions ratios for sex and education were computed to evaluate samples' representativeness.

    Results Differences in the age distributions were found among women from Sweden and Portugal and among men from Belgium, Hungary, Portugal and Sweden. Over-recruitment of more educated respondents was noted in all sites.

    Conclusion The use of a common research protocol with the same structured questionnaire is likely to provide accurate estimates of the general population IPV frequency, despite limitations in probabilistic sampling and restrictions in methods of administration.

  • 5. Juth, Pernilla
    et al.
    Lundquist, Daniel
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Arne
    Looking for foes and friends: Perceptual and Emotional factors when Finding a Face in the Crowd2005In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 379-395Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Mörtberg, Ewa
    et al.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Fyring, Cecilia
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Intense Cognitive-Behavioural Group Treatment (CBGT) of Social Phobia: A randomized controlled study2006In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 646-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of intensive cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) for social phobia (DSM-IV) were studied in 26 patients randomly assigned either to a treatment group (TG) or to a 6-month waiting list control group (WG). Treatment involved 2 weeks of daily treatment sessions separated by 1 week of homework assignments. TG was superior to WG at all assessment points, i.e., at 3 weeks and at 3 and 6 months of post-treatment. After 6 months, significant treatment effects were found in the majority of social phobia measures indicating decreased levels of social anxiety and avoidance, safety-behaviors and symptoms influence on daily life. The WG received treatment following the waiting list period and was combined with the TG in order to evaluate the outcome in a larger sample. Treatment gains at 3 weeks were maintained or improved at 1-year follow-up. Average effect sizes of social phobia measures ranged from 0.56 at post-treatment, 0.68 at 3 months and 0.81 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively.

  • 7. Ruck, Christian
    et al.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Douglas Steele, J
    Edman, Gunnar
    Meyersson, B
    Ericsson, K
    Nyman, H
    Åsberg, M
    Svanborg, P
    Capsulotomy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: long term follow up of 25 patients2008In: Archives of General Psychiatry, ISSN 0003-990X, E-ISSN 1538-3636, Vol. 65, no 8, p. 914-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Context: Capsulotomy is sometimes used as a treatment of last resort in severe and treatment refractory cases of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Objective: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of capsulotomy in OCD. Design: Non-controlled long-term follow-up trial (mean 10.9 years after surgery). Setting: University hospital referral center. Patients: 25 consecutive OCD patients having undergone capsulotomy between the years 1988 and 2000. Intervention: Unilateral or bilateral capsulotomy. Lesions were created either by conventional heating or by gamma-radiation (radiosurgery). Main Outcome Measure: Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Rating Scale (Y-BOCS). Results: Mean Y-BOCS was 34 preoperatively and dropped to 18 at long-term follow-up (p<0.0001). Response (defined as ≥ 35 % reduction at long-term compared to baseline) was seen in 12 patients at long-term. Eight patients were in remission (Y-BOCS < 16) at long-term follow-up. Response rates did not differ between surgical method. A mean weight gain of 6 kg was reported in the first postoperative year. Ten patients were considered to sufferer from significant problems in the area of executive functioning, apathy or disinhibition. Six of these ten patients had either had high doses of radiation or multiple surgical procedures. Our MRI analysis of 11 patients suggests that the OCD symptom reduction may be increased by reducing the lateral extension of the lesions, and a reduction in the medial and posterior extension may limit the risk of side effects, that is, smaller lesions may produce better results. Conclusions: Capsulotomy is effective in reducing OCD symptoms. There is a substantial risk of side effects and the risk may vary between surgical methods. Our findings suggest that smaller lesions are safer and that high radiation doses and multiple procedures should be avoided.

  • 8.
    Thomtén, Johanna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Center for Health and Medical Psychology (CHAMP), School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psychological factors in genital pain: The role of fear-avoidance, pain catastrophizing and anxiety sensitivity among women living in Sweden2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 193-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: One in five women under the age of 30 report recurrent genital pain and pain during sexual intercourse. Female genital pain negatively affects sexual and general health, as well as dyadic function and quality of life. Although the current field of research and clinical expertise in general agree upon a biopsychosocial conceptualization, there is still a lack of theoretical models describing the psychosocial mechanisms involved in the development of genital pain. Originally developed to outline the transition from acute to chronic back pain, the fear avoidance (FA) model has lately been proposed as a possible tool in illustrating the mechanisms involved in genital pain. However, only few studies have empirically tested the components of the FA model empirically. The aim of the present study is to examine fear avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and symptoms of depression and anxiety among women reporting genital pain, and to relate these concepts to sexual satisfaction/function and the characteristics of pain. Methods: The study was a population-based study using a postal questionnaire administered to 4052 women (age 18-35). Of these 944 (response rate: 23%) took part in the study. Results: Genital pain of six months duration was reported by 16.1% of the women. Women with pain reported elevated levels of symptoms of anxiety, fear avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing and anxiety sensitivity. Symptoms of anxiety also predicted pain in the explanatory model together with vaginal tension and fungal infection. Vaginal tension has previously been described as a fear-response to painful intercourse and the results thereby seem to give further support to viewing genital pain from a fear avoidance perspective. Furthermore, fear avoidance beliefs seem to be of similar importance as lack of desire for the experience of sexual satisfaction and could also predict pain during specific activities among women with pain. The results also indicate that sexual satisfaction is related to a specific pain-related fear, rather than a heightened level of general anxiety. Conclusions: The study had a low response rate, but still indicates that genital pain is common and is associated with several aspects of fear and avoidance. In sum, the results support the FA model by giving strong support for fear reactions (vaginal tension) and fear avoidance beliefs, and moderate support for negative affect. In the model negative affect drives pain catastrophizing. Implications: It seems that the experience of genital pain among women in the general population is common and could be associated with increased levels of anxiety and fear-avoidance beliefs. However, the associations should not be understood in isolation from physiological mechanisms but seem to indicate interactions between, e.g. fungal infections, negative appraisals of pain and symptoms, lack of sexual function and satisfaction and increased pain experience. It is possible that psychological mechanisms work in the transition from acute physiological pain to chronic psychologically maintained pain in terms of secondary reactions to, e.g. repeated fungal infections by adding emotional distress, fear of pain and avoidance behaviours. © 2014 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf