Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Innovation in the hospitality industry: Firm or location?2017In: Tourism Economics, ISSN 1354-8166, E-ISSN 2044-0375, Vol. 23, no 8, p. 1591-1614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hospitality industry is a rapidly growing revenue generator in many countries and is becoming economically important for generating employment and for integrating of immigrants into the labor market. As an industry where firms face fierce competition, it is important for the firms to maintain their competitiveness by distinguishing themselves from others through continuous improvements and innovations. In this article, we investigate the determinants of innovation in the hospitality industry by analyzing survey data gathered from over 900 firms in Sweden. In the analysis, we differentiate between firm-specific and location-specific features. We conclude that the most important characteristics that explain innovation lie within the firm itself, not the location. These results provide important insights regarding firm- versus location-placed innovation policies.

  • 2.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Innovationer inom besöksnäringen2017Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Holgersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Nordström, Louise
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Dummy variables vs. category-wise models2014In: Journal of Applied Statistics, ISSN 0266-4763, E-ISSN 1360-0532, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Empirical research frequently involves regression analysis with binary categorical variables, which are traditionally handled through dummy explanatory variables. This paper argues that separate category-wise models may provide a more logical and comprehensive tool for analysing data with binary categories. Exploring different aspects of both methods, we contrast the two with a Monte Carlo simulation and an empirical example to provide a practical insight.

  • 4.
    Holgersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Statistics.
    Nordström, Louise
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    On regression modelling with dummy variables versus separate regressions per group: comment on Holgersson et al.2016In: Journal of Applied Statistics, ISSN 0266-4763, E-ISSN 1360-0532, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1564-1565Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lopez, Esteban
    Center for Economics and Regional Policy, Business School, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Chile.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Who works longer - and why?: Regional and individual characteristics in the timing of retirement2018In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 350-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Who works longer - and why? This paper investigates the characteristics of people that stay longer in the workforce, even beyond the time they are eligible to retire. In our regional analysis, we use an 11-year balanced panel of 290 Swedish regions. In the individual analysis, we use a large individual level panel to apply Cox proportional hazard estimates on 'risk' of entering retirement. Our results show a large gender difference: women tend to retire earlier than men. Between employees and entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs retire later. People in larger regions tend to retire later. Higher house prices, and the share of small firms in a region correlate with a lower likelihood of retirement. The local tax rate and the share of blue-collar workers in a region is significantly related to lower retirement age. A high average wage, commuting intensity, and high human capital in a region is associated with later retirement.

  • 6.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    In search of services in the market place: A probability of presence approach for retail services in Sweden2012In: Innovative Marketing, ISSN 1814-2427, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 47-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the probability of finding a number retail services in Swedish municipalities with respect to theirmarket potential. In particular, the authors investigate how different degrees of market potential affects the presence ofcertain retail activities in central and non-central municipalities in Sweden. Using a probabilistic approach, the resultssuggest that, for both central and non-central municipalities, the probability of finding certain retail services dependsheavily on the market potential within the municipality. The size of the external market is determined to have a varyingimpact depending both on the size of the market place, and the type of the retail branch investigated.

  • 7.
    Klaesson, Johan
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Market reach for retail services2014In: The Review of Regional Studies, ISSN 0048-749X, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 153-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retail is concentrated in areas where demand is high. A measure of market potential can be used to calculate place-specific demand for retail services. The effect of distance on market potential depends on the willingness of consumers to travel for the products they purchase. The spatial reach of demand is frequently operationalized using a distance-decay function. The purpose of this paper is to estimate such distance-decay functions for different branches of the retail sector. The paper uses spatial data from the Stockholm region in Sweden. The results indicate that, in line with theory, there are indeed differences in the distance decay of demand among retail subsectors.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Location and co-location in retail: a probabilistic approach using geo-coded data for metropolitan retail markets2014In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 385-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we employ geo-coded data at a fine spatial resolution for Sweden’s metropolitan areas to assess retail co-location. Retail clusters and their place in urban space are assessed from several angles. The probability of a specific type of retail unit to be established in a 250 by 250 m square is modelled as a function of (i) the presence of other similar retail establishments, (ii) the presence of stores that belong to other retail sectors and (iii) other characteristics of the square area, and its access to demand in the pertinent urban landscape. The analysis clarifies which types of retail clusters one can expect to find in a metropolitan region, as well as their relationship to the urban landscape. We analyse three distinct types of stores: clothing, household appliances, and specialized stores. Stores with high intensities of interaction are co-located, and predominantly located close to the urban cores, consistent with predictions from bid rent theory and central place theory. We further document negative location tendencies between shops that sell frequently purchased products and shops that sell durables. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of demand in the close surroundings, which is particularly strong for small-scale establishments.

  • 9.
    Mellander, Charlotta
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Culture City2011In: Journal of Town and City Management, ISSN 1756-9538, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 246-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture and creativity have been seen as catalysts for social change, urban diversity and revitalisation of neighbourhoods by thinkers such as Richard Florida and Charles Landry. The creative and cultural sectors are also viewed as essential parts of urban economies, both as factors attracting population and as a dynamic part of the economy with strong growth. This means that these sectors stimulate economic growth in cities in several ways. From descriptive statistics one knows that occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is spatially concentrated in large metropolitan regions. This observation, and other theoretical arguments, stress that the performance and growth of these sectors should be assumed to be dependent on agglomeration economies. In this analysis, the authors examine the relationship between spatial distribution and growth of occupation, in a sample of people working in the creative and cultural sectors, in relation to growth in cities in Sweden. One interesting finding from the empirical analysis is that, when the authors analyse differences between the core and peripheral parts of functional regions, they find that there are no real signs of significant differences between them. In particular, they find that in the peripheral municipalities (suburbs) that surround the core municipalities, the occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is more correlated to population growth in these municipalities than proximity to creative and cultural occupation in the core parts of the functional regions. From a policy perspective, this means that investments in culture not only matter for the biggest cities and city centres, but also for the medium and smaller-sized regions, as well as the suburbs.

  • 10.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Accessibility to knowledge and new firm formation in Sweden2013In: Studies in Regional Science, ISSN 0287-6256, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 89-104Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how accessibility to knowledge is related to the new firm formation in Sweden. Utilizing municipal level data, the paper examines how and to what extent geographic proximity to establish-ments that are specialized in formal knowledge creation plays a role for the overall entrepreneurial milieu in a city region. While measuring accessibility to knowledge at intra-municipal, intra-regional and extra-regional levels, the paper maps out the clustering patterns of new firms and ranks the municipalities by their perfor-mance in creating an entrepreneurial milieu. The clustering patterns of new firms highlight critical factors in new firm formation and entrepreneurial performance of regions.

  • 11.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Location and Co-location in Retail: A Probabilistic Approach Using Geo-coded Data for Swedish Metropolitan Retail Markets2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a unique empirical approach to detect co-location patterns in the retail sector. We analyse the co-location of retail service establishments in Sweden by using geo-coded data. We pinpoint each establishment in Sweden down to a 250 by 250 metre square. Our analysis captures a general pattern for the co-location of different types of retailing activities, also taking into account several spatial attributes of location. We study the three major retail markets in Sweden (Stockholm, Malmö, and Gothenburg). We position the paper within a framework in which the presence of an economic activity in space is explained by the spatial attributes of the place as well as the nature of the economic activity. Our empirical design follows a probabilistic approach, whereby the probability of finding a particular type of retailing activity in a square is explained by the presence of similar and different kinds of retailing activities in the respective square, as well as by the characteristics of their location. We select three major and distinct types of retailing stores: clothing, household appliances, and specialized stores. Our findings are well in line with the propositions of bid rent theory and central place theory for retail markets. We further document negative location tendencies between shops that sell frequently purchased products and shops that sell durables. Moreover, our results highlight the importance of demand in the close surroundings, which is particularly strong for small-scale establishments.

  • 12.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    RETAIL CITY: Does accessibility to shops explain place attractiveness?2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the role of retail as an amenity and how it contributes to place attractiveness. In this investigation the impact of accessibility to shops on average house prices is investigated using a fixed effect estimation. The analysis use data for Swedish municipalities through the years 2002-2008. The empirical design is constructed using the across-cities spatial equilibrium framework of Roback (1982), and house prices are assumed to reflect the attractiveness of municipalities. In order to capture the precise impact from retail access, mean wages, population density, unemployment, leisure service concentration, and municipal tax levels are controlled for. Results indicate a strong relationship between retail access and place attractiveness, where a retail-premium on house prices is found to be present for Swedish municipalities.

  • 13.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), Sweden.
    Retail City: The Relationship between Place Attractiveness and Accessibility to Shops2017In: Spatial Economic Analysis, ISSN 1742-1772, E-ISSN 1742-1780, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 72-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retail city: the relationship between place attractiveness and accessibility to shops. Spatial Economic Analysis. This paper explores the role of retailers as an urban amenity. Using data for Swedish rural and city municipalities for 2002–08, ‘accessibility-to-shops’ measures are constructed for the shops in the municipalities and the hosting regions separately to examine the relationship between consumption possibilities and place attractiveness in a spatial continuum. Place attractiveness is proxied by a Q ratio for Swedish housing investment based on Tobin’s Q. Access to stores within municipal market boundaries is found to be relevant for the place attractiveness of city municipalities, whereas no such relationship is evident for rural municipalities.

  • 14.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Retail Location2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis in hand presents four individual chapters, all of which explore the spatial aspects of the retail sector. The theoretical framework used in all four papers is vastly rooted in the urban and regional economics literature. Using novel data from Sweden for the application of various econometric methods, the thesis investigates (i) the distance sensitivity of demand and market reach for various types of retail activities, (ii) the spatial composition of retail markets and co-location patterns between the various branches of the sector, (iii) the spatial determinants of independent retailers’ productivity, and (iv) the relationship between the retail sector and place attractiveness.

    The first paper (co-authored with Johan Klaesson) establishes a methodological framework for estimating distance decay and market accessibility for various types of retail activities given a lack of consumer data. The paper addresses the heterogeneous nature of the sector and provides a solid categorization for various types of retail activities. The second paper (coauthored with Johan P. Larsson) employs a unique empirical approach to characterize the location and co-location of retailers in the metropolitan markets. The analysis captures the co-location tendencies between various types of retailers at a highly disaggregated  geographical level, where the importance of access to demand in the pertinent urban landscape is also accentuated.

    In the third paper, I investigate the spatial determinants of retail productivity. The focus of the paper is on the influence of market size and regional hierarchy on the productivity of independent retailers. The results show a higher productivity premium from the immediate market potential for stores located in central markets compared to stores located in non-central markets. On the other hand, regional market potential is found to play an equally important role for the productivity of stores located both in central and non-central markets. In the fourth paper, I address the role of retail as an urban amenity. In the empirical analysis, to capture the relevance of consumption possibilities for place attractiveness, “access to stores” measures are constructed for both the municipal and regional levels. Although consumption possibilities in the region are found to be positively associated with the place attractiveness of both rural and city municipalities, store access in municipal market boundaries is found to be relevant only for the place attractiveness of city municipalities.

  • 15.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Sweden.
    Retail Productivity: The effects of market size and regional hierarchy2018In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 711-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How important is regional hierarchy for retailers’ productivity? This paper investigates the determinants of independent retailers’ productivity in Sweden between 2002 and 2008 with respect to market size and regional hierarchy. Using an accessible market potential approach, the impact of the potential demand in close proximity, and in the region is investigated separately for stores in central and peripheral retail markets. The findings suggest that the market size in close proximity has a higher impact on the productivity of stores located in central markets, whereas the market potential in the region has similar productivity returns for both stores in central markets and stores in non-central markets.

  • 16.
    Öner, Özge
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    RETURNS TO LOCATION IN RETAIL: Investigating the relevance of market size and regional hierarchy2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates returns to location in the retail sector and further analyzes the systematic variations across central and peripheral retail markets, as well as across different types of retailing activities. The empirical design utilizes individual level data, where the earnings of individuals working in the retail sector are used as a proxy for retail performance, which allows for a comparison across different types of retailing activities, although the sector as a whole is highly heterogeneous. In order to capture the urban-periphery interaction in retail markets, an accessible market potential measure is used, which allows for capturing the impact from potential demand in close proximity, in the region and from outside of the region separately. In the analysis, the impacts of spatial, store, and individual characteristics are analyzed for four types of retailing activities: food retailing, clothing, household retailing and specialized stores. The results are in line with previous theoretical arguments that rely on traditional location theories. There is a distinct variation between urban and peripheral retail markets, as well as between different types of retailing activities. Market size in close proximity is found to play an important role for stores selling goods for frequent purchase, whereas the relevant market extends beyond municipal borders for retailers selling goods for less frequent purchase. The competition effect is evident for non-central markets, driven from close proximity to large central markets.

  • 17.
    Öner, Özge
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Does ethnic enclaves foster immigrant entrepreneurship? The Swedish experience2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Öner, Özge
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Location of leisure: the New Economic Geography of leisure services2017In: Leisure Studies, ISSN 0261-4367, E-ISSN 1466-4496, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 203-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding more about the geographic location of leisure services is an important quest for research. For a long time now in developed economies, almost all employment growth is occurring within the service sector. In this sector, leisure services are fast growers. This means that the location of these services is important for economic growth and for employment opportunities of local market areas. Regional policy-makers time and again highlight these sectors as future engines of growth. This paper investigates the role of local demand in determining the availability and the scale of various types of leisure services. The analysis is motivated by observed regularities that indicate large and persistent interregional differences in the location and growth of leisure services. Based on a New Economic Geography framework, we investigate the role of local and regional demand for the size of leisure services in geographically separate markets in Sweden. We use data for 290 Swedish municipalities for the period 2002–2013 and run year-municipality fixed-effects regressions. Our main findings suggest a strong dependency on local demand, and less on the demand originating from other regions.

  • 19.
    Öner, Özge
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Larsson, Johan P.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Which retail services are co-located?2014In: International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, ISSN 0959-0552, E-ISSN 1758-6690, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 281-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Which retail services are co-located in space? Is it possible to categorize retail stores of different kinds with respect to their location pattern? Acknowledging the spatial dependency between different and similar kinds of retailing activities, the aim of this paper is to find if and to what extent co-location is present in a retail market and what kind of retailing activities are co-located.

    Design/methodology/approach – The authors analyse the co-location of different types of retail stores in Sweden by using geo-coded data. The data they use allows them to pinpoint each establishment in Sweden down to a 250 by 250m square in space. First, they identify a measure of co-location for each retail service by utilizing pairwise correlations between the different retail service establishments with respect to the squares in which they are present. Later, by using the finest level of industrial categorization for all physical retailing activities (and limiting their geographical unit to the Stockholm metropolitan market), they perform factor analysis to nest these retailing activities under relevant categories based on their co-location pattern.

    Findings – In this analysis the authors obtain four major factors for the squares with retail stores, in which several kinds of retail activities are nested. These factors reveal a certain degree of location commonality for the markets in question.

    Originality/value – The authors' empirical design is based on a highly disaggregated spatial information and the methodology is novel in a sense that it has not been used to address a similar question. Rather than sampling, the authors use the total population, where they take all physical retailing activities into account to be able to draw a general picture for the co-location phenomena in the entire retail market.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf