Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Kianian, Babak
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Additive Manufacturing Technology Potential: A Cleaner Manufacturing Alternative2016In: INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2015, VOL 4, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016, Vol. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on an emerging manufacturing technology called Additive Manufacturing (AM) and its potential to become a more efficient and cleaner manufacturing alternative. This work is built around selected case companies, where the benefit of AM compared to other more traditional technologies is studied through the comparison of resource consumption. The resource consumption is defined as raw materials and energy input. The scope of this work is the application of AM in the scale model kit industry. The method used is the life cycle inventory study, which is a subtype of life cycle assessment (LCA). The result of the paper is the quantification of raw materials and energy consumption. The outcomes shows that AM has higher efficiency in terms of materials usage, as a higher proportion of materials ending up in the final product. Injection Molding (IM), on the other hand, wastes a significant proportion of raw materials in components that are not part of the final product. If the same or similar raw materials are used in both manufacturing methods, the advantage is clearly with AM. However, AM has higher energy consumption in comparison to the injection molding technique (IM). In terms of energy consumption, AM only has an advantage in this area when working with a very low production volume. The analysis of the energy consumption shows that most of the energy used in AM is to create the final product, while IM only uses a fraction of the total energy to produce the final product. AM technologies are still very new but have the potential for development and reduction of energy consumption in the future. Added to this potential is the higher materials usage efficiency of AM, which reduce the waste of materials and the energy, embedded in them. These two factors are likely to position AM as cleaner manufacturing alternative.

  • 2.
    Kianian, Babak
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Tavassoli, Mohammad
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Manufacturing Renaissance: Return of manufacturing to western countries2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing Renaissance, i.e. return of manufacturing to west, has been recently observed. This paper analyzes the patterns observed within each of the four main drivers behind this new phenomenon and delves more deeply into the driver that centers on the new manufacturing technologies such as Additive Manufacturing (AM) and 3D Printing. Next, this paper will make the case that the location of manufacturing will be in west, relying on the established theory that has been able to explain the location of manufacturing, i.e. Product Life Cycle Model (PLC).

  • 3.
    Kianian, Babak
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Larsson, Tobias C
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    The Role of Additive Manufacturing Technology in job creation: an exploratory case study of suppliers of Additive Manufacturing in Sweden2015In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier , 2015, Vol. 26, p. 93-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his paper investigates how Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies, as a process innovation, may contribute to a job creation. Further, the various mechanisms in which AM may contribute to an increase in job creation as well as the types of jobs are analyzed. The analysis also goes beyond AM technologies and incorporates other non-technological factors which foster job creation, i.e. higher wages in BRIC countries, lower quality in BRIC countries, and a rising demand for western-made products. The analysis is based on a case study and the data collected was through interviews with three prominent actors within the AM technologies field in Sweden: technology developers, leading suppliers and users. The main findings indicate that AM (i) contributes to job creation in both the manufacturing sector and in the service sector, (ii) does not bring back mass production jobs from emerging economies such as BRIC, (iii) contributes to job creation in product development stages (e.g. rapid prototyping), and (iv) contributes to job creation in production stages of low-volume batches mainly of complex products. The findings also suggest there are barriers for full exploitation of AM in several areas, including education systems.

  • 4.
    Kianian, Babak
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Larsson, Tobias C.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Diegel, Olaf
    Lund Univ, Fac Engn LTH, Design Sci Dept, Lund, Sweden..
    The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden2016In: 13TH GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING - DECOUPLING GROWTH FROM RESOURCE USE, 2016, p. 7-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes the adoption of Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies in Sweden. The dataset consists of a recent and representative sample of Swedish AM users (companies, universities, and research institutes). The authors investigate two questions. Firstly, what are the current applications of AM in Sweden (e.g. Rapid Prototyping (RP), production)? Secondly, what are the factors that can explain the variation in AM adoption among the users? Using a regression analysis technique, the main findings are as follows. (i) There is a variation among users' choice of AM application, and the majority of users are expanding their AM applications beyond RP. (ii) There are two factors that positively affect the decision of firms to expand classical RP and also incorporate production and management. These two factors are using multiple AM technologies (as opposed to single Fused Deposition Modeling technology) and being small companies. The authors discuss the implication of these results. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 5.
    Kianian, Babak
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Tavassoli, Sam
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Industrial Economics.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Diegel, Olaf
    The Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in Sweden2015In: 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, ISSN 2329-7662, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies in Sweden. The data set consists of a recent and representative sample of Swedish AM users (companies, universities, and research institutes). The authors investigate two questions. First, what are the current applications of AM in Sweden (e.g., rapid prototyping [RP], production)? Second, what are the factors that can explain the variation in AM adoption among the users? Using a regression analysis technique, the main findings are as follows. (i) There is a variation among users' choice of AM application, and the majority of users are expanding their AM applications beyond RP. (ii) There are two factors that positively affect the decision of firms to expand classical RP and incorporate production and management as well. These two factors are using multiple AM technologies (as opposed to single fused deposition modeling technology) being small companies. The authors discuss the implication of these results.

  • 6.
    Nopparat, Nanond
    et al.
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Kianian, Babak
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Thompson, Anthony
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Strategic Sustainable Development.
    Larsson, Tobias
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Resource Consumption in Additive Manufacturing with a PSS Approach2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1980’s, additive manufacturing (AM) has gradually advanced from rapid prototyping applications towards fabricating end consumer products. Many small companies may prefer accessing AM technologies through service providers offering production services as result-oriented Industrial Product-Service System (IPSS) rather than investing in their own production line. This study investigated potential benefits of IPSS using system dynamics modeling to study resource demands between two situations: one where an IPSS approach is used and one that is the traditional ownership of production equipment. This study concluded that AM service providers with demand-varying customers could increase service performance and maximize use of production equipment.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf