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  • 1. Aguilera, Thomas
    et al.
    Cattaneo, Claudio
    Dee, E.T.C.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    van der Steen, Bart
    Warnecke, Jakob
    Mapping the Movement: Producing maps of squatted social centres in Western Europe2017In: Trespass Journal, Vol. 1, p. 84-102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Barranco, Oriol
    et al.
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    González, Robert
    Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, México.
    La PAH y la emergencia habitacional2018In: Movimientos sociales y derecho a la ciudad: creadores de democracia radical / [ed] Pedro Ibarra, Ricard Gomà, Salvador Martí, Robert González, Barcelona: Icaria , 2018, p. 54-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cattaneo, Claudio
    et al.
    Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.
    MARTINEZ, MIGUEL A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Department of Sociology.
    The Squatters' Movement in Europe, Commons and Autonomy as Alternatives to Capitalism2014Book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dadusc, Deanna
    et al.
    Univ Brighton, Sch Appl Social Sci, Criminol, Brighton, E Sussex, England.
    Grazioli, Margherita
    Gran Sasso Sci Inst, Social Sci Dept, GSSI, Urban Studies Unit, Laquila, Italy.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Introduction: citizenship as inhabitance? Migrant housing squats versus institutional accommodation2019In: Citizenship Studies, ISSN 1362-1025, E-ISSN 1469-3593, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 521-539Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue focuses on migrants’ self-organised strategies in relation to housing in Europe, namely the collective squatting of vacant buildings and land. In particular, the contributions to this special issue differentiate between shelter provided in state-run or humanitarian camps and squatted homes. Migrants squats are an essential part of the ‘corridors of solidarity’ that are being created throughout Europe, where grassroots social movements engaged in anti-racist, anarchist and anti-authoritarian politics coalesce with migrants in devising non-institutional responses to the violence of border regimes. In these spaces contentious politics and everyday social reproduction uproot racist and xenophobic regimes. The struggles emerging in these spaces disrupt host-guest relations, which often perpetuate state-imposed hierarchies and humanitarian disciplining technologies. Moreover, the solidarities and collaborations between undocumented and documented activists challenge hitherto prevailing notions of citizenship and social movements, as well as current articulations of the common. These radical spaces enable possibilities for inhabitance beyond, against and within citizenship, which do not only reverse forms of exclusion and repression, but produce ungovernable resources, alliances and subjectivities that prefigure more livable spaces for all. Therefore, these struggles are interpreted here as forms of commoning, as they constitute autonomous socio-political infrastructures and networks of solidarity beyond and against the state and humanitarian provision.

  • 5.
    Díaz-Parra, Ibán
    et al.
    Human Geography Department, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
    Martínez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Shifting Socio-Spatial Contexts and the Space of Social Movements: Squatting in Seville2018In: The Urban Politics of Squatters' Movements / [ed] Miguel A. Martinez, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    González, Robert
    et al.
    Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca, Mexico.
    Díaz-Parra, Ibán
    University of Seville, Sevilla, Spain.
    Martínez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Squatted Social Centres and the Housing Question2018In: The Urban Politics of Squatters' Movements / [ed] Miguel A. Martinez, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 271-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    González, Robert
    et al.
    Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, México.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Barranco, Oriol
    Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Autogestión de equipamientos y espacios urbanos: los centros sociales okupados y autogestionados2018In: Movimientos sociales y derecho a la ciudad: creadores de democracia radical / [ed] Pedro Ibarra, Ricard Gomà, Salvador Martí y Robert González, Barcelona: Icaria , 2018, p. 88-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Martinez Lopez, Miguel Angel
    et al.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Lorenzi Fernandez, Elisabeth
    Univ Nacl Educ Distancia, Madrid, Spain..
    AUTONOMOUS ACTIVIST-RESEARCH The case of the squatters' movement in Madrid2012In: Revista Internacional de Sociologia, ISSN 0034-9712, E-ISSN 1988-429X, Vol. 70, p. 165-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Citizen participation has been recently incorporated in the design and implementation of different public policies but participants have often criticised that there is little room for autonomous modes of citizen participation within institutional frameworks. Which are the specific features of autonomous processes of citizen participation compared to the most institutional ones? How does autonomous participation develop? This article deals with the methodological aspects of autonomous participation. In doing so, we will present an experience of autonomous activist-research within the squatters' movement of Madrid which lasted for two and a half years. In particular, we focus on the methodological decisions taken by activist-researchers and describe the major contributions of this participatory process. We argue that such an activist-research process was based upon three different strategies which provided a productive framework for the participants' involvement: a) an open, horizontal and self-managed group of activist-researchers; b) an open-source and copy-left commitment in order to fulfill an equal access to the production of knowledge; c) a qualitative and comprehensive methodology which allowed to gather a wide range of information taking into account the social diversity within the squatters' movement.

  • 9.
    Martinez López, Miguel
    Department of Sociology II: Human Ecology and Population, Universidad Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Complexity and participation: the path of strategic invention2008In: ISR. Interdisciplinary science review, ISSN 0308-0188, E-ISSN 1743-2790, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 153-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epistemological basis of the participatory action-research (PAR) methodology in the so-called 'paradigm of complexity' is plagued with misconceptions, imprecision and significant omissions. The appropriate and contextualised translation of concepts from the natural sciences for use in the social sciences is particularly necessary in qualitative-structural and participatory-dialectic methodological trends. This paper focuses on the concepts of 'entropy', 'complexity' and 'strategic action'. Based on a general notion of complexity relating to the consideration of uncertainty, innovation and the contextualisation of systems, performance-related aspects indicative of actions implied by this paradigm may be highlighted. Thus, it is argued that the conceptualisation of operations such as 'acting in order to know' and 'act knowing/know by acting', encompassed in the notion of 'strategic invention', complement and exceed the scope of typical planning operations and even self-planning ('knowing in order to act'). In short, these definitions are coherent with an ecosystemic perspective of social and natural reality, in which it is necessary to contextualise what is more or less complex in the world, in our knowledge of the world and in our practical actions when acting in the world. Consequently, participatory action-research methodologies should adopt this complex ecosystemic epistemological perspective, and be designed through a 'strategic invention' approach, in order to clarify the concepts imported from other scientific disciplines.

  • 10.
    Martinez López, Miguel A.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Fac Ciencias Polit & Sociol, Dept Sociol 2, Madrid, Spain.
    The Squatters' Movement in Europe: A Durable Struggle for Social Autonomy in Urban Politics2013In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 866-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatting empty properties for living or to develop public activities has lasted in European cities for more than three decades. Although local and national contexts differ significantly, there are also some general trends and patterns that deserve careful attention. When squatting occasionally appears in public debates, controversy is generated and many gaps open between academic, social and political perceptions. In this article I use evidence from several European cities to argue that the squatters' movement has produced an original impact in urban politics. The main feature of this impact has been to generate a relatively wide autonomous and mainly non-institutional mode of citizen participation, protest and self-management. How has this been possible? Which are the specific contributions made by this urban movement? These are questions that both scholars and activists continuously claim to be relevant, so that this research attempts to offer some general answers based on detailed comparisons and experiences.

  • 11.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Amanda Huron 2018: Carving out the Commons: Tenant Organizing and Housing Cooperatives in Washington, DC. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press2019In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 812-814Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Univ Complutense Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Dimensiones múltiples de la participación ciudadana en la planificación espacial2011In: REVISTA ESPANOLA DE INVESTIGACIONES SOCIOLOGICAS, ISSN 0210-5233, no 133, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pluralist and one-dimensional views are prevalent in the analysis of citizen participation processes linked to spatial planning processes. This article examines the definitions of such processes as proposed by authors with elitist, conflictualist and, in general, multi-dimensional perspectives. Their contributions provide more suitable theoretical frameworks for social investigation purposes and highlight important variables such as the role of experts, the origin of participatory initiatives and their socio-political consequences. We maintain that multi-dimensional perspectives offer a more comprehensive approach to the analysis of urban policies in which citizen participation is embedded. Hence, the article focuses on four multi-dimensional approaches, their main differentiating features, and the ways in which they represent an alternative to one-dimensional conceptions of citizen participation in terms of the collective exercise of power and the actors and methods involved.

  • 13.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Framing Urban Movements, Contesting Global Capitalism and Liberal Democracy2019In: Contested Cities and Urban Activism / [ed] Yip, Ngai Ming, Martínez López, Miguel A., Sun, Xiaoyi, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, 1, , p. 313p. 25-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume advances our understanding of urban activism beyond the social movement theorization dominated by thesis of political opportunity structure and resource mobilization, as well as by research based on experience from the global north. Covering a diversity of urban actions from a broad range of countries in both hemispheres as well as the global north and global south, this unique collection notably focuses on non-institutionalised or localised urban actions that have the potential to bring about radical structural transformation of the urban system and also addresses actions in authoritarian regimes that are too sensitive to call themselves “movement”. It addresses localized issues cut off from international movements such as collective consumption issues, like clean water, basic shelter, actions against displacement or proper venues for street vendors, and argues that the integration of the actions in cities in the global south with the specificity of their local social and political environment is as pivotal as their connection with global movement networks or international NGOs. A key read for researchers and policy makers cutting across the fields of urban sociology, political science, public policy, geography, regional studies and housing studies, this text provides an interdisciplinary and international perspective on 21st century urban activism in the global north and south.

  • 14.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Good and Bad Squatters?: Challenging Hegemonic Narratives and Advancing Anti-Capitalist Views of Squatting in Western European Cities2019In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 165-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mainstream mass media and politicians tend to portray squatters as civic evils. Breaking in and trespassing on private property is clumsily equated with the occupation of empty premises. Squatting is often represented as a serious criminal offence even before any legal verdict has been determined. The social diversity of squatters and the circumstances around this practice are usually omitted. Dominant narratives in Western European cities were effective in terms of criminalisation of squatting and the social groups that occupied vacant properties –homeless people in need of a shelter, those who cannot afford to buy or rent convenient venues for performing social activities, activists who squat as a means of protest against real estate speculation, etc. This article reviews the available evidence of those narratives and disentangles the main categories at play. I first examine homogenisation stereotypes of squatters as a whole. Next, I distinguish the divides created by the conventional polarisation between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ squatters. It is argued that both dynamics foster the stigma of squatting and facilitate its repression, although these discursive struggles engage squatters as well. As a consequence, I discuss the implications of ‘reversive’ and ‘subversive’ narratives performed by squatters to legitimise their practices and movements. In particular, the anti-capitalist features of these counter-hegemonic responses are identified and elaborated, which adds to the topic’s literature.

  • 15.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The autonomy of struggles and the self-management of squats: legacies of intertwined movements2019In: Interface. A journal for and about social movements, ISSN 2009-2431, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 178-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do squatters’ movements make a difference in urban politics? Their singularity in European cities has often been interpreted according to the major notion of ‘autonomy’. However, despite the recent upsurge of studies about squatting (Cattaneo et al. 2014, Katsiaficas 2006, Martínez et al. 2018, Van der Steen et al. 2014), there has not been much clarification of its theoretical, historical and political significance. Autonomism has also been identified as one of the main ideological sources of the recent global justice and anti-austerity movements (Flesher 2014) after being widely diffused among European squatters formore than four decades, which prompts a question about the meaning of its legacy. In this article, I first examine the political background of autonomism as a distinct identity among radical movements in Europe in general (Flesher et al. 2013, Wennerhag et al. 2018), and the squatters in particular—though not often explicitly defined. Secondly, I stress the social, feminist and anti-capitalist dimensions of autonomy that stem from the multiple and specific struggles in which squatters were involved over different historical periods. These aspects have been overlooked or not sufficiently examined by the literature on squatting movements. By revisiting relevant events and discourses of the autonomist tradition linked to squatting in Italy, Germany and Spain, its main traits and some contradictions are presented. Although political contexts indicate different emphases in each case, some common origins and transnational exchanges justify an underlying convergence and its legacies over time. I contend that autonomism is better understood by focusing on the social nature of the separate struggles by the oppressed in terms of self-management, collective reproduction and political aggregation rather than highlighting the individualistic view in which personal desiresand independence prevail. This interpretation also implies that autonomy for squatters consists of practices of collective micro-resistance to systemic forms of domination which politicise private spheres of everyday life instead of retreating to them.

  • 16.
    Martinez, Miguel
    University Complutense of Madrid — Sociology II, Madrid, Spain..
    The Citizen Participation of Urban Movements in Spatial Planning: A Comparison between Vigo and Porto2011In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 147-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urban planning of municipal territory is still a key element of urban politics despite competition from other types of spatial planning and the influence of supra-local policies such as those introduced by European institutions. To gauge its importance, I selected the last two master plans developed in the cities of Vigo (Spain) and Porto (Portugal) and examined the contributions of urban movements to citizen participation in these plans. The periods of transition to democracy in both cities prompted the appearance of important citizen movements, but these have evolved differently in each city. This article describes the evolution of these movements in both cities and explains why they culminated in a conflictive participation model in the master plan of Vigo, while in Porto the opportunities for citizen participation in the master plan were neutralized. To conclude, it is argued that this comparison reveals the importance of local contexts of urban governability shaped by a history of strategic interactions between urban movements and elites, which reduces the validity of neoliberal conceptions of governance to explain citizen participation in relation to spatial planning. Resume L'urbanisation du territoire municipal reste un element-cle de la politique de la ville malgre la concurrence d'autres types de planification spatiale et l'influence de programmes d'amenagement supra-locaux, comme ceux qui emanent des institutions europeennes. Pour evaluer son importance, cette etude a choisi les deux derniers plans directeurs elabores dans les villes de Vigo (Espagne) et de Porto (Portugal) afin d'analyser ce que les mouvements urbains ont apporte a la participation des habitants dans le cadre de ces plans. Les phases de transition vers la democratie ont fait naitre d'importants mouvements citoyens, ceux-ci evoluant differemment dans chacune des deux villes. Cet article decrit la transformation de ces mouvements et explique pourquoi ils menent a un modele participatif conflictuel dans le cas du plan directeur de Vigo, tandis que les possibilites de participation des habitants ont ete neutralisees dans celui de Porto. En conclusion, cette comparaison revele l'importance des contextes locaux de la gouvernementalite urbaine, celle-ci etant faconnee par l'historique des interactions strategiques entre les elites et les mouvements urbains, ce qui module la validite des conceptions neoliberales de gouvernance dans leur explication de la participation des habitants en lien avec l'amenagement spatial.

  • 17.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Univ La Rioja, La Rioja, Spain.
    The squatters' movement: Urban counter-culture and alter-globalization dynamics2007In: South European Society & Politics, ISSN 1360-8746, E-ISSN 1743-9612, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 379-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatting in abandoned houses and buildings in Spanish cities has been a continuous occurrence since the early 1980s. CSOAs (Ccntros Sociales Okupados y Autogestionados/Squatted and Self-Managed Social Centres) acquired greater public importance than buildings squatted only for housing purposes. Nevertheless, both forms of squatting have taken place simultaneously. This article delineates the main characteristics of this movement by taking into consideration: (a) spatial trends, (b) the ideological principles, (c) attempts at coordination and (d) the interrelationship with other social movements. This exercise develops a working definition of the squatters' movernent in Spain which allows us to argue that its repertoire of protest and political objectives represents an innovation in the cycle of alter-globalization demonstrations which the squatters' movement has actively joined.

  • 18.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Beyond solidarity: Migrants and squatters in Madrid2017In: Migration, Squatting and Radical Autonomy / [ed] Mudu, P. & Chattopadhyay, S, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 189-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Bitter wins or a long-distance race?: Social and political outcomes of the Spanish housing movement2019In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1588-1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates whether housing movements can produce significant outcomes. In particular, I examine the case of the Platform for People Affected by Mortgages (PAH), the main organization in the Spanish housing movement between 2009 and 2017. First, I discuss how their demands were framed according to specific contexts of legitimation. Second, I distinguish the nature and scope of the outcomes produced by this movement. My analysis uniquely combines a critical assessment of the PAH’s achievements with its unintended consequences and the significant social, political and economic contexts that help to explain its major outcomes. The global financial crisis, the convergence of the PAH with other anti-neoliberal movements and shifts among the dominant political parties determine the opportunities and constraints of the PAH’s development. Within this environment, the housing movement strategically operates by framing the culprits of the economic crisis in a new manner and by appealing to a broad social base beyond the impoverished mortgage holders. I also include the capacity of the movement’s organization to last, expand and increase its legitimacy as a relevant socio-political outcome. This is explained here through the articulation of the PAH’s agency (organizational form and protest repertoire) within the aforementioned contexts.

  • 20.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    University Complutense of Madrid Department of Sociology II Madrid Spain.
    How Do Squatters Deal with the State?: Legalization and Anomalous Institutionalization in Madrid2014In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 646-674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radical and autonomous urban movements like the European squatters' movement tend to resist integration into the institutions of the state, although particular legal and political conditions in each country or city may significantly alter this tendency. In this article, I examine the controversial issue of 'institutionalization' among squatters, focusing on the few cases of legalized squats (social centres) in the city of Madrid. Negotiations with the state authorities and processes of legalization are the major forms of institutionalization involving squatters. However, an anomalous kind of institutionalization also emerges once squats, whether legalized or not, become consolidated and socially accepted. For squatting to have a successful impact, then, depends on both the type of autonomy achieved by squatters and the different outcomes of the processes of institutionalization. The case of Madrid provides empirical evidence that: (1) negotiations with state authorities were very frequent among squatters, but most were defensive; (2) the few cases of legalization were due to specific conditions such as the urban centrality of the squats, single-issue identities, social network solidarity, favourable media coverage, formal organizations working as facilitators and the squatters' leadership of the process. Furthermore, legalized squats in Madrid preserved a high degree of autonomy, self-management and ties to other radical social movements. In conclusion, both the legalized squats and the squatters' movement in Madrid as a whole, avoided 'terminal institutionalization' and, instead, gave shape to a 'flexible' one.

  • 21.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
    Squatters and migrants in Madrid: Interactions, contexts and cycles2017In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 2472-2489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squatters and migrants use the city space in a peculiar and anomalous manner. Their contributions to the social and political production of urban space are not usually considered crucial. Furthermore, their mutual relationship is under-researched. In this paper I investigate the participation of migrants in the squatting of abandoned buildings. This may entail autonomous forms of occupation but also various kinds of interactions with native squatters. By looking historically at the city of Madrid I distinguish four major forms of interactions. I collect evidence in order to show that deprivation-based squatting is not necessarily the prevailing type. The forms of ‘empowerment’ and ‘engagement’ were increasingly developed while ‘autonomy’ and ‘solidarity’ were continuously present. These variations occurred because of specific drivers within the cycles of movements’ protests and other social and political contexts which facilitated the cooperation between squatters and migrants, although language barriers, discrimination in the housing market and police harassment constrained them too. Therefore, I argue first that two key social organisations triggered the interactions in different protest cycles. Second, I show how, in spite of the over-representation of Latin American migrants, the political squatting movement in Madrid has consistently incorporated groups of migrants and their struggles in accordance with anti-fascist, anti-racist and anti-xenophobic claims and practices. The analysis also provides a nuanced understanding about the ‘political’ implications of squatting when migrants are involved.

  • 22.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Squatters in the Capitalist City: Housing, Justice, and Urban Politics2020Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the disperse research on the squatters’ movement in Europe. In Squatters in the Capitalist City, Miguel A. Martínez López presents a critical review of the current research on squatting and of the historical development of the movements in European cities according to their major social, political and spatial dimensions. 

    Comparing cities, contexts, and the achievements of the squatters’ movements, this book presents the view that squatting is not simply a set of isolated, illegal and marginal practices, but is a long-lasting urban and transnational movement with significant and broad implications. While intersecting with different housing struggles, squatters face various aspects of urban politics and enhance the content of the movements claiming for a ‘right to the city.’ Squatters in the Capitalist City seeks to understand both the socio-spatial and political conditions favourable to the emergence and development of squatting, and the nature of the interactions between squatters, authorities and property owners by discussing the trajectory, features and limitations of squatting as a potential radicalisation of urban democracy.

  • 23.
    Martinez, Miguel A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roitman, Sonia
    The University of Queensland.
    Informal Settlers2019In: The Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Urban and Regional Studies / [ed] Anthony M. Orum, New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature and scope of “informal settlers” are defined according to specific historical conditions, social conflicts, and spatial configurations. In contrast with the prevailing negative features of slums, other types of informal dwelling are here distinguished and a more nuanced account of informal living given. This approach has consequences for the study of land tenure in terms of its diversity, security, and possible formalization. It is argued that investigations on informality need to focus on the power struggles over resources and the meanings and perceptions of informality, in addition to the systemic constraints for informal settlers, instead of only identifying social practices not in accordance with dominant conventional and legal norms.

  • 24.
    Martinez, Miguel Angel
    et al.
    City Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Garcia, Angela
    Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Inst Govern & Polit Publ, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain..
    Occupy the squares, freeing buildings2015In: ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies, ISSN 1492-9732, E-ISSN 1492-9732, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 157-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 15-M movement has faced financial crisis and neoliberal policies with an explosive and sustained social mobilisation of a precarious multitude. Organisational autonomy and transnational networks also defined the novelties of this movement. In this article we explain the main structural components of the 15-M movement and argue that the initial protest camps served as models of selforganisation and direct democracy, beyond their function as mere means for fuelling major discontents. Secondly, we explain how a virtuous convergence between the occupiers of the squares and the squatters of buildings was produced. Based on an empirical research of the Madrid case, we conclude that the convergence of those two social movements was possible due to: a) a process of "cumulative chains of activists exchanges"; b) specific socio-spatial and socio-political opportunity conditions; c) the successful appeal to both squatters and occupiers of the campaign "stop foreclosures" by bringing about the housing question as a key issue within the 15-M movement. Among the consequences of this mutual collaboration, squatting gained an increasing legitimacy and was more frequently practised.

  • 25.
    Martinez, Miguel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Garcia, Angela
    Converging movements: occupations of squares and buildings2017In: Crisis and Mobilization in Contemporary Spain: the 15M Movement / [ed] Benjamin Tejerina Montaña, & Ignacia Perugorria, Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Martinez, Miguel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Miguel, Angel
    The urban politics of squatters' movements2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume sheds light on the development of squatting practices and movements in nine European cities (Madrid, Barcelona, Seville, Rome, Paris, Berlin, Copenhagen, Rotterdam and Brighton) by examining the numbers, variations and significant contexts in their life course. It reveals how and why squatting practices have shifted and to what extent they engender urban movements. The book measures the volume and changes in squatting over various decades, mostly by focusing on Squatted Social Centres but also including squatted housing. In addition, it systematically compares the cycles, socio-spatial structures and the political implications of squatting in selected cities. This collection highlights how squatters’ movements have persisted over more than four decades through different trajectories and circumstances, especially in relation to broader protest cycles and reveals how political opportunities and constraints influence the conflicts around the legalisation of squats.

  • 27.
    Martinez, Miguel
    et al.
    Univ Complutense Madrid, E-28040 Madrid, Spain..
    Rosende, Silvia
    Univ Santiago de Compostela, Santiago De Compostela, Spain..
    Participación ciudadana en las agendas 21 locales: cuestiones críticas de la gobernanza urbana2011In: Scripta Nova: revista electrónica de geografía y ciencias sociales, ISSN 1138-9788, E-ISSN 1138-9788, Vol. 15, no 355, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental planning such as the Local Agenda 21 (LA21) launched by United Nations in the Summit of Rio de Janeiro in 1992, has been increasingly used as a new strategy of urban governance without challenging the mainstream patterns of economic growth and representative democracy. This kind of planning focuses on sustainable issues of both cities and global spaces by means of public debate, citizen involvement and consensual agreements. Along the last decade, the European Union has supported and funded many of these planning processes based on the assumption that they will improve urban sustainability and citizen participation. Nevertheless, we think that the supposed new styles of urban governance and citizen participation implied by LA21 processes do not change substantially the pluralist and elitist ways of urban governability. What we have discovered due to the comparative analysis of two cases of successful LA21, one in Portugal and one in Spain, is that citizen participation was not so plural as expected, and had little consequences for the improvement of participatory democracy and urban sustainability. Based on in-depth interviews and documents, our assessment of these two LA21 processes also shows that local politics -such as the cycles of mobilization and the social networks around public services- and supra-local contexts -such as the ways of management conflicts and EU funds by one euroregional lobby- are relevant for explaining the apparent success of citizen participation in these two cities. Finally, we indicate several social conflicts which were disrupting the whole processes. Thus, we conclude by pointing out the methods and contexts of the actual implementation of LA21 in order to explain why, in practice, citizen participation was conducted more by the action of authorities and managers than by the citizens who were involved in such a process.

  • 28.
    Martínez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Introduction: The Politics of Squatting, Time Frames and Socio-Spatial Contexts2018In: The Urban Politics of Squatters' Movements / [ed] Miguel A. Martinez, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Martínez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Socio-Spatial Structures and Protest Cycles of Squatted Social Centres in Madrid2018In: The Urban Politics of Squatters' Movements / [ed] Miguel A. Martinez, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 25-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Martínez, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Urban emptiness, ghost owners, and squatters' challenges to private property2018In: Contested Property Claims: What disagreement tells us about ownership / [ed] Maja Hojer Bruun, Patrick Joseph Cockburn, Bjarke Skærlund Risager, and Mikkel Thorup, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Martínez, Miguel A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    García, Ángela
    University of Barcelona.
    The Occupation of Squares and the Squatting of Buildings: Lessons About the Convergence of Two Social Movements2018In: Crisis and Social Mobilization : The 15M Movement / [ed] B. Tejerina & I. Perugorria, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Piazza, Gianni
    et al.
    University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Martínez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    More than Four Decades of Squatting: Cycles, Waves and Stages of Autonomous Urban Politics in European Cities2018In: The Urban Politics of Squatters' Movements / [ed] Miguel A. Martinez, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 229-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Polanska, Dominika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Department of Sociology.
    Piotrowski, Grzegorz
    European Solidarity Center, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Wstęp2018In: Skłoting w Europie Środkowej i Rosji / [ed] Dominika V. Polanska, Grzegorz Piotrowski, Miguel A. Martínez, Gdansk: European Solidarity Centre , 2018, p. 5-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Polanska, Dominika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Piotrowski, GrzegorzEuropean Solidarity Center, Gdańsk, Poland.Martinez, Miguel
    Skłoting w Europie Środkowej i Rosji2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [pl]

    Skłoting – czyli zajmowanie pustostanów bez zgody ich właścicieli – jest od dawna przedmiotem akademickiej dyskusji. Jednak ten fenomen nie doczekał się jeszcze kompleksowego ujęcia z perspektywy Europy Środkowej. Niniejszy raport jest pierwszą tego rodzaju próbą w języku polskim. Autorzy tekstów nie tylko przedstawiają genealogie tego zjawiska w Budapeszcie, Wilnie, Pradze, Poznaniu, Warszawie czy Petersburgu, ale także podejmują debatę z aktualną literaturą przedmiotu, analizując to zjawisko z różnych perspektyw.

  • 35.
    Tan, Hongze
    et al.
    Department of Sociology at Nankai University, City University of Hong Kong, China.
    Martinez López, Miguel A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Dancing with shackles? The sociopolitical opportunities, achievements, and dilemmas of cycling activism in Guangzhou, China2019In: Journal of Urban Affairs, ISSN 0735-2166, E-ISSN 1467-9906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, urban cycling has re-emerged as a popular mode oftransportation in Chinese cities. This article examines how grassroots activismcontributed to this cycling renaissance by considering the case ofGuangzhou. In the wake of rapid economic development, the Chinese gov-ernment modified its transportation policies such that cycling was revived,with Guangzhou playing a role in the“rise, fall, and re-emergence”of Chinaas a“cycling kingdom.”We contend that these sociopolitical circumstances ofeconomic development and political opening up provided a structuralopportunity for cycling activists, who gained public visibility and institutionalrecognition through their strategic interaction with both governmental andnongovernmental actors. In addition, activists empowered themselves byaccumulating and transforming their social capital. Their example resonatedwith other marginal organizations and the resulting alliances enhanced thelegitimacy of cycling as a movement. Finally, we identify the dilemmas andlimitations of cycling activism in urban China due to the closure of localgovernance channels and the perception that cycling issues are“nonurgent.”

  • 36.
    Tan, Hongze
    et al.
    Nankai University, Tianjin, China.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Has Urban Cycling Improved in Hong Kong?: A Sociopolitical Analysis of Cycling Advocacy Activists’ Contributions and Dilemmas2019In: Contested Cities and Urban Activism / [ed] Yip, Ngai Ming; Martínez López, Miguel A.; Sun, Xiaoyi, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, 1, , p. 313p. 123-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, bicycles, as a mode of urban transportation, have become increasingly visible in the political agenda and the public debate in Hong Kong, a traditionally ‘non-cycling’ city (Zhao 2010). Although the trans-portation issue as a whole, and the urban cycling issue in particular, is traditionally a ‘public’ area in which the government plays a key role, a significant change that recently occurred is that some non- governmental actors increasingly enjoyed active and influential roles in bringing changes to the issue. This article concerns one category of emerging non-governmental actors in Hong Kong-cycling advocacy activists—to explore how they bring changes to both the cycling issue and the power relations surrounding it through interactions with other actors, especially state agencies. Besides, we will also reveal and discuss the real and poten-tial dilemmas they face.

  • 37.
    Yip, Ngai Ming
    et al.
    City University of Hong Kong.
    Martinez, MiguelUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.Sun, XiaoyiFudan University.
    Contested Cities and Urban Activism2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This edited volume advances our understanding of urban activism beyond the social movement theorization dominated by thesis of political opportunity structure and resource mobilization, as well as by research based on experience from the global north. Covering a diversity of urban actions from a broad range of countries in both hemispheres as well as the global north and global south, this unique collection notably focuses on non-institutionalised or localised urban actions that have the potential to bring about radical structural transformation of the urban system and also addresses actions in authoritarian regimes that are too sensitive to call themselves “movement”. It addresses localized issues cut off from international movements such as collective consumption issues, like clean water, basic shelter, actions against displacement or proper venues for street vendors, and argues that the integration of the actions in cities in the global south with the specificity of their local social and political environment is as pivotal as their connection with global movement networks or international NGOs. A key read for researchers and policy makers cutting across the fields of urban sociology, political science, public policy, geography, regional studies and housing studies, this text provides an interdisciplinary and international perspective on 21st century urban activism in the global north and south.

  • 38.
    Yip, Ngai Ming
    et al.
    City University of Hong Kong.
    Martinez, Miguel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sun, Xiaoyi
    Fudan University.
    Introductory Remarks and Overview2019In: Contested Cities and Urban Activism / [ed] Yip, Ngai Ming, Martínez López, Miguel A., Sun, Xiaoyi, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, 1, , p. 313p. 3-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of ‘urban activism’ holds an ambiguous status in both the fields of social movements and urban studies. It usually conflates the meanings of ‘urban movements’ and all sorts of activist practices that take place in cities. ‘Urban movements’ is the conventional expression to capture sustained mobilisations and protests that challenge consolidated power structures in relation to the production and transformation of urban spaces. When these collective actions are neither lasting over time nor sufficiently challenging the rulers and managers over the territory, it seems convenient to just designate them broadly as ‘activism’. Therefore, we argue that urban activism occurs within specific organisations not much coordinated with others, and when it is focused on single-issue demands and campaigns with limited duration and capacity to alter the deep roots of urban politics. Activists are engaged participants in collec-tive action as members of disparate groups who can turn into contributors to larger movements under certain circumstances. We elaborate on this distinction more accurately.

1 - 38 of 38
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