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  • 1.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Kelly, Greg
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Martins, Isabel
    Exploring the Landscape of Scientific Literacy: Visions for Research and Practice: Exploring language perspectives2009In: Symposium paper presented at European Science Education Research Association ESERA 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    A Disciplinary Discourse Perspective on University Science Learning: Achieving Fluency in a Critical Constellation of Modes2009In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, ISSN 0022-4308, E-ISSN 1098-2736, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 27-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this theoretical article we use an interpretative study with physics undergraduates to exemplify a proposed characterization of student learning in university science in terms of fluency in disciplinary discourse. Drawing on ideas from a number of different sources in the literature, we characterize what we call “disciplinary discourse” as the complex of representations, tools and activities of a discipline, describing how it can be seen as being made up of various “modes”. For university science, examples of these modes are: spoken and written language, mathematics, gesture, images (including pictures, graphs and diagrams), tools (such as experimental apparatus and measurement equipment), and activities (such as ways of working—both practice and praxis, analytical routines, actions, etc.). Using physics as an illustrative example, we discuss the relationship between the ways of knowing that constitute a discipline and the modes of disciplinary discourse used to represent this knowing. The data comes from stimulated recall interviews where physics undergraduates discuss their learning experiences during lectures. These interviews are used to anecdotally illustrate our proposed characterization of learning and its associated theoretical constructs. Students describe a repetitive practice aspect to their learning, which we suggest is necessary for achieving fluency in the various modes of disciplinary discourse. Here we found instances of discourse imitation, where students are seemingly fluent in one or more modes of disciplinary discourse without having related this to a teacher-intended disciplinary way of knowing. The examples lead to the suggestion that fluency in a critical constellation of modes of disciplinary discourse may be a necessary (though not always sufficient) condition for gaining meaningful holistic access to disciplinary ways of knowing. One implication is that in order to be effective, science teachers need to know which modes are critical for an understanding of the material they wish to teach.

  • 3.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University ; University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Bilingual Scientific Literacy2011In: Exploring the landscape of scientific literacy / [ed] C. Linder, L. Östman, D. Roberts, P.-O. Wickman, G. Ericksen & A. MacKinnon, London: Routledge , 2011, p. 106-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Tvåspråkig ämneskompetens? En studie av naturvetenskaplig parallellspråkighet i svensk högre utbildning: Bilingual disciplinary literacy? A study of parallel language use in Swedish undergraduate science2010In: Språkvård och språkpolitik: Svenska språknämndens forskningskonferens i Saltsjöbaden 2008 = Language planning and language policy : proceedings of the Swedish Language Council Research Conference in Saltsjöbaden 2008 / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Andersson, Olle Josephson, Inger Lindberg, Mats Thelander, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2010, p. 195-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Challenges faced by teachers implementing socio-scientific issues as core elements in their classroom practices2015In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 159-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers may face considerable challenges when implementing socio‐scientific issues (SSI) in their classroom practices, such as incorporating student‐centred teaching practices and exploring knowledge and values in the context of socio-scientific issues. This year‐long study explores teachers’ reflections on the process of developing their classroom practices when implementing SSI. Video‐recorded discussions between two upper secondary school science teachers and an educational researcher, grounded in the teachers’ reflections on their classroom practices, provided data for the analysis. The results show that during the course of the implementation the teachers enhanced their awareness of the importance of promoting students’ participation and supporting their independence as learners. However, the results also suggest a conflict between the enactment of a student‐centred classroom practice and the achievement of intended learning goals. In order to accept the challenge of implementing SSI in the classroom, it is suggested that it is essential for teachers to build strategies, which integrate dialogue about learning goals.

  • 6.
    Bossér, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Lundin, Mattias
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Teachers’ challenges when faced with developing their practice through the integration of SSI2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Edfors, Inger
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Fokusgrupper avslöjar representationersmöjligheter och begränsningar för lärande i naturvetenskap2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Fredlund, Tobias
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction2012In: European journal of physics, ISSN 0143-0807, E-ISSN 1361-6404, Vol. 33, p. 657-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that interactive engagement enhances student learning outcomes. A growing body of research suggests that the representations we use in physics are important in such learning environments. In this paper we draw on a number of sources in the literature to explore the role of representations in interactive engagement in physics. In particular we are interested in the potential for sharing disciplinary knowledge inherent in so-called persistent representations (such as equations, diagrams and graphs), which we use in physics.

    We use selected extracts from a case study, where a group of senior undergraduate physics students are asked to explain the phenomenon of refraction, to illustrate implications for interactive engagement. In this study the ray diagram that was initially introduced by the students did not appear to sufficiently support their interactive engagement. However, the introduction of a wavefront diagram quickly led their discussion to an agreed conclusion. 

    From our analysis we conclude that in interactive engagement it is important to choose appropriate persistent representations to coordinate the use of other representations such as speech and gestures. Pedagogical implications and future research are proposed. 

  • 9.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Wågman, Åsa
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Anne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    University teachers’ professional development through a focus group approach2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Norms, knowledge claims and authorities as justifications in students' reasoning about using new technology in societal practice2011In: Science & Culture: Promise, Challenge and Demand, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how students draw on norms, knowledge claims and authorities when reasoning about socioscientific issues. The aim of the study is to provide an image of students' sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues by referring to the above mentioned modalities of the societal structures ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ (Giddens 1984). Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). At the time for interviews, the students had participated in and completed an introductory course in genetics which included a group discussion about genetic diseases and ethics. A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis of interviews. Students were found to use both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. By doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge claims can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in experts. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on sharing norms with experts.

  • 11.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Students' Ontological Security and Agency in Science Education: An Example from Reasoning about the Use of Gene Technology2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 14, p. 2299-2330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a study of how students’ reasoning about socioscientific issues is framed by three dynamics: societal structures, agency and how trust and security issues are handled. Examples from gene technology were used as the forum for interviews with 13 Swedish highschool students (year 11, age 17–18). A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used to structure the analysis. The results illustrate how the participating students used both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify positions that accept or reject new technology. The analysis also showed how norms and knowledge can be used to justify opposing positions in relation to building trust in science and technology, or in democratic decisions expected to favour personal norms. Here, students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on perceptions of the knowledge base that the authority was seen to be anchored in. Difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms) was also found. These outcomes are used to draw attention to the educational challenges associated with students’ using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation) and how this is related to the development of a sense of agency in terms of sharing norms with experts or with laymen.

  • 12.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Students' reasoning about using new technology and the change of societal practice.2011In: Science Learning & Citizenship, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates how students' reasoning about socioscientific issues is framed by their notion of societal structures, for the purpose to provide an image of their sense of agency and how they handle trust and security issues. Examples from gene technology were used as the subject for interviews with 13 Swedish high-school students (year 11, age 17-18). A grid based on modalities from the societal structures described by Giddens was used for analysis. Students used both modalities for ‘Legitimation’ and ‘Domination’ to justify acceptance or rejection of new technology. Doing that, they showed how norms as well as knowledge can be used to justify opposing position as they were trying to build trust in either science and technology or in democratic decisions expected to favour their norms. It was found that students accepted or rejected the authority of experts based on their having or lacking appropriate knowledge. Students were also found to have difficulty in discerning between material risks (reduced safety) and immaterial risks (loss of norms). Attention is drawn to the problem of students' using knowledge claims (Domination) to support norms (Legitimation). Furthermore, students' sense of agency appears to be dependent on either sharing norms with experts or with laymen.

  • 13.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala Universitet.
    The nature - nurture conflict: a part of biology education?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through historical discourses the boundaries between the concepts “nature” and “nurture” have been blurred, thus hampering the understanding of conflicts in contemporary debates on, for example, medicine and gene technology. In education, such conflicts between nature and nurture are brought to the fore, and without promoting the understanding of the multiple meanings of these concepts and their roles in societal discourse the goals to develop students’ socioscientific decision-making seem unattainable. This study problematizes students’ use of “nature” and “naturalness” to further the development of the experience of science education in relation to the nature-nurture debate. We build on the social constructivism view that present conceptions of nature and naturalness emanate from historical and modern social constructions of nature. Data were collected from interviews with 33 upper secondary school students (16-19 years) from 4 classes. Students’ claims or explanations that actualized the control of human actions pertaining to treatments for hereditary diseases by making use of concepts of “nature” and “naturalness were analysed. Within the Enlightenment view and the Romantic view, the students suggested control of human activity on different levels of biological organisation. The Romantic concept of nature was described by referring to the balance in nature (population level), the purity of nature (organism and cellular levels), and the laws of nature (gene level). Students holding the Enlightenment view of nature presented the imperfection of nature (organism, cellular and gene levels) as a common phenomenon. Here, nurture was considered natural to overcome such imperfections. Apparently, the Enlightenment view allows the embedding of nurture into nature by use of knowledge, in contrast to the preserving and moral stance held within the Romantic view. These conflicting views should be addressed in biological education to promote students’ understanding of contemporary discourses dependent on the different concepts of nature and nurture.

  • 14.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    What’s natural about nature? Deceptive concepts in socio-scientific decision-making2015In: European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 2301-251X, E-ISSN 2301-251X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 250-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conflicts between nature and nurture are brought to the fore and challenges socio-scientific decision-making in science education. The multitude of meanings of these concepts and their roles in societal discourses can impede students’ development of understanding for different perspectives, e.g. on gene technology. This study problematizes students’ use of “nature” and “naturalness” to further the development of the experience of science education in relation to the nature-nurture debate. We build on the social constructivism view that present conceptions of nature and naturalness emanate from historical and modern social constructions of nature. Claims presented by upper secondary school students in interviews actualizing the control of human actions pertaining to treatments for hereditary diseases by making use of concepts of “nature” and “naturalness were analysed. The students suggested control of human activity on different levels of biological organisation, either from within the Romantic view or the Enlightenment view on nature. The Romantic view provided students with moral grounds for consistently preserve what is considered as nature and means to bolster their reasoning by referring to the balance in nature, the purity of nature, and the laws of nature. The Enlightenment view provided students with means to support gene technology by embedding “nurture” into the concept “nature” by using knowledge while implying that nurture is a natural way to overcome such imperfections of nature. We propose that these conflicting views should be addressed in biological education to promote students’ understanding of contemporary discourses dependent on the different concepts of nature and nurture.

  • 15.
    Patron Sigfridsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Wikman, Susanne
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Edfors, Inger
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Johansson-Cederblad, Brita
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala universitet.
    Kemilärares reflektioner kringanvändning av visuella representationer2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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