Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 23 av 23
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Ahmad, Irma
    et al.
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Infect Dis, Örebro, Sweden..
    Edin, Alicia
    Umeå Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umeå, Sweden..
    Granvik, Christoffer
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Persson, Lowa Kumm
    Umeå Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umeå, Sweden..
    Tevell, Staffan
    Karlstad Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Karlstad, Sweden.;Ctr Clin Res & Educ, Karlstad, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Ctr Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Marklund, Ingela
    Ctr Clin Res & Educ, Karlstad, Sweden.;Umeå Univ, Dept Community Med & Rehabil, Umeå, Sweden..
    Persson, Ida-Lisa
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Kauppi, Anna
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Forsell, Mattias N. E.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    Sundh, Josefin
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Resp Med, Örebro, Sweden..
    Lange, Anna
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Infect Dis, Örebro, Sweden..
    Cajander, Sara
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Infect Dis, Örebro, Sweden..
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Microbiol, Umeå, Sweden..
    High prevalence of persistent symptoms and reduced health-related quality of life 6 months after COVID-192023Ingår i: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 11, artikel-id 1104267Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe long-term sequelae after COVID-19 constitute a challenge to public health and increased knowledge is needed. We investigated the prevalence of self-reported persistent symptoms and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in relation to functional exercise capacity, 6 months after infection, and explored risk factors for COVID-19 sequalae. MethodsThis was a prospective, multicenter, cohort study including 434 patients. At 6 months, physical exercise capacity was assessed by a 1-minute sit-to-stand test (1MSTST) and persistent symptoms were reported and HRQoL was evaluated through the EuroQol 5-level 5-dimension (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire. Patients with both persistent symptoms and reduced HRQoL were classified into a new definition of post-acute COVID syndrome, PACS+. Risk factors for developing persistent symptoms, reduced HRQoL and PACS+ were identified by multivariable Poisson regression. ResultsPersistent symptoms were experienced by 79% of hospitalized, and 59% of non-hospitalized patients at 6 months. Hospitalized patients had a higher prevalence of self-assessed reduced overall health (28 vs. 12%) and PACS+ (31 vs. 11%). PACS+ was associated with reduced exercise capacity but not with abnormal pulse/desaturation during 1MSTST. Hospitalization was the most important independent risk factor for developing persistent symptoms, reduced overall health and PACS+. ConclusionPersistent symptoms and reduced HRQoL are common among COVID-19 survivors, but abnormal pulse and peripheral saturation during exercise could not distinguish patients with PACS+. Patients with severe infection requiring hospitalization were more likely to develop PACS+, hence these patients should be prioritized for clinical follow-up after COVID-19.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Iversen, Soren
    et al.
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ingham, Anna Cäcilia
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Edslev, Sofie Marie
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Tevell, Staffan
    Cty Council Varmland, Dept Infect Dis, SE-65182 Karlstad, Sweden.;Cty Council Varmland, Ctr Clin Res & Educ, SE-65182 Karlstad, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Infect Dis, SE-58183 Norrkoping, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Biomed Sci, SE-58183 Norrkoping, Sweden..
    Söderquist, Bo
    Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Lab Med, Clin Microbiol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Stegger, Marc
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark.;Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Andersen, Paal Skytt
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Alteration of Bacterial Communities in Anterior Nares and Skin Sites of Patients Undergoing Arthroplasty Surgery: Analysis by 16S rRNA and Staphylococcal-Specific tuf Gene Sequencing2020Ingår i: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 8, nr 12, artikel-id 1977Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to study alterations of bacterial communities in patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty to assess the impact of chlorhexidine gluconate soap decolonisation and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. A Swedish multicentre, prospective collection of samples obtained from elective arthroplasty patients (n = 83) by swabbing anterior nares, skin sites in the groin and the site of planned surgery, before and after arthroplasty surgery, was analysed by 16S rRNA (V3-V4) gene sequencing and a complementary targeted tuf gene sequencing approach to comprehensively characterise alterations in staphylococcal communities. Significant reductions in alpha diversity was detected for both bacterial (p = 0.04) and staphylococcal (p = 0.03) groin communities after arthroplasty surgery with significant reductions in relative Corynebacterium (p = 0.001) abundance and Staphylococcus hominis (p = 0.01) relative staphylococcal abundance. In nares, significant reductions occurred for Staphylococcus hominis (p = 0.02), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (p = 0.02), and Staphylococcus pasteuri (p = 0.003) relative to other staphylococci. Staphylococcus aureus colonised 35% of anterior nares before and 26% after arthroplasty surgery. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most abundant staphylococcal species at all sampling sites. No bacterial genus or staphylococcal species increased significantly after arthroplasty surgery. Application of a targeted tuf gene sequencing approach provided auxiliary staphylococcal community profiles and allowed species-level characterisation directly from low biomass clinical samples.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 3.
    Iversen, Søren
    et al.
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ingham, Anna Cäcilia
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Edslev, Sofie Marie
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious Diseases and Centre for Clinical Research and Education, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital Västmanland, Uppsala University, Region Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Stegger, Marc
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Paal Skytt
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Alteration of Bacterial Communities in Anterior Nares and Skin Sites of Patients Undergoing Arthroplasty Surgery: Analysis by 16S rRNA and Staphylococcal-Specific tuf Gene Sequencing2020Ingår i: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 8, nr 12, artikel-id E1977Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to study alterations of bacterial communities in patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty to assess the impact of chlorhexidine gluconate soap decolonisation and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. A Swedish multicentre, prospective collection of samples obtained from elective arthroplasty patients (n = 83) by swabbing anterior nares, skin sites in the groin and the site of planned surgery, before and after arthroplasty surgery, was analysed by 16S rRNA (V3-V4) gene sequencing and a complementary targeted tuf gene sequencing approach to comprehensively characterise alterations in staphylococcal communities. Significant reductions in alpha diversity was detected for both bacterial (p = 0.04) and staphylococcal (p = 0.03) groin communities after arthroplasty surgery with significant reductions in relative Corynebacterium (p = 0.001) abundance and Staphylococcus hominis (p = 0.01) relative staphylococcal abundance. In nares, significant reductions occurred for Staphylococcus hominis (p = 0.02), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (p = 0.02), and Staphylococcus pasteuri (p = 0.003) relative to other staphylococci. Staphylococcus aureus colonised 35% of anterior nares before and 26% after arthroplasty surgery. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most abundant staphylococcal species at all sampling sites. No bacterial genus or staphylococcal species increased significantly after arthroplasty surgery. Application of a targeted tuf gene sequencing approach provided auxiliary staphylococcal community profiles and allowed species-level characterisation directly from low biomass clinical samples. 

  • 4.
    Krifors, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre of Clinical Research, Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Elisabeth
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Rashid Teljebäck, Mulki
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Wallin, Robert P. A.
    SciEd Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Ola
    ABC Labs, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Centre of Clinical Research, Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden .
    Long-lasting T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens after vaccination-a prospective cohort study of HCWs working with COVID-19 patients2023Ingår i: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 53, nr 2, s. 142-148Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of hospitalisation and death, but vaccine-induced IgG antibodies against the spike protein (IgG S) decline over time. Less is known about the nature of the vaccine-induced T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens.

    METHODS: IgG antibodies against nucleocapsid protein (IgG N), IgG S, and T-cell response towards SARS-CoV-2 antigens were determined in samples taken between November 2020 and November 2021 from a cohort of healthcare workers at an Infectious Diseases Department. RT-PCR screening for SARS-CoV-2 was encouraged once every four weeks in addition to testing when symptomatic or identified through contact tracing. Vaccination data were collected at the end of the study.

    RESULTS: At inclusion, T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens was found in 10/15 (66.7%) of participants with a previous/current COVID-19 infection and in 9/54 (16.7%) of participants with no prior/current history of COVID-19 infection. All participants with complete follow-up (n = 59) received two doses of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine during the study. All participants demonstrated detectable IgG (S) antibodies at the end of the study, in median 278 days (IQR 112) after the second vaccine dose. All but four participants displayed T-cell responses towards SARS-CoV-2 antigens. IgG S antibody levels correlated with time since the second vaccine dose. In addition, previous COVID-19 infection and the strength of the S1 T-cell response correlated with IgG S antibody levels. However, no correlation was demonstrated between the strength of the T-cell response and time since the second vaccine dose.

    CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccination induces robust T-cell responses that remain for at least nine months.

  • 5.
    Krifors, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Vastmanlands Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, S-72189 Västerås, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Freyhult, Elisabeth
    Vastmanlands Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Västerås, Sweden..
    Teljeback, Mulki Rashid
    Vastmanlands Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, S-72189 Västerås, Sweden..
    Wallin, Robert P. A.
    SciEd Solut, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Winqvist, Ola
    ABC Labs, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mansson, Emeli
    Vastmanlands Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, S-72189 Västerås, Sweden.;Reg Vastmanland Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res, Västerås, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Örebro, Sweden..
    Long-lasting T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens after vaccination-a prospective cohort study of HCWs working with COVID-19 patients2023Ingår i: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 55, nr 2, s. 142-148Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 reduces the risk of hospitalisation and death, but vaccine-induced IgG antibodies against the spike protein (IgG S) decline over time. Less is known about the nature of the vaccine-induced T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens.

    Methods: IgG antibodies against nucleocapsid protein (IgG N), IgG S, and T-cell response towards SARS-CoV-2 antigens were determined in samples taken between November 2020 and November 2021 from a cohort of healthcare workers at an Infectious Diseases Department. RT-PCR screening for SARS-CoV-2 was encouraged once every four weeks in addition to testing when symptomatic or identified through contact tracing. Vaccination data were collected at the end of the study.

    Results: At inclusion, T-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens was found in 10/15 (66.7%) of participants with a previous/current COVID-19 infection and in 9/54 (16.7%) of participants with no prior/current history of COVID-19 infection. All participants with complete follow-up (n = 59) received two doses of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine during the study. All participants demonstrated detectable IgG (S) antibodies at the end of the study, in median 278 days (IQR 112) after the second vaccine dose. All but four participants displayed T-cell responses towards SARS-CoV-2 antigens. IgG S antibody levels correlated with time since the second vaccine dose. In addition, previous COVID-19 infection and the strength of the S1 T-cell response correlated with IgG S antibody levels. However, no correlation was demonstrated between the strength of the T-cell response and time since the second vaccine dose.

    Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccination induces robust T-cell responses that remain for at least nine months.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Moritz, David
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Krifors, Anders
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Centre of Clinical Research Region Västmanland, Uppsala University, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Elisabeth
    Department of Microbiology, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanlands Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Seroprevalence and T-cell response in 32 children 10 months after COVID-192022Ingår i: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 111, nr 5, s. 1042-1043Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 7.
    Moritz, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för pediatrik.
    Krifors, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Freyhult, Elisabeth
    Vastmanlands Hosp, Dept Microbiol, Västerås, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Seroprevalence and T-cell response in 32 children 10 months after COVID-192022Ingår i: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 111, nr 5, s. 1042-1043Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis in prosthetic joint infections2019Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is ubiquitous in the human microbiota, but also an important pathogen in healthcare-associated infections, such as prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). In this thesis, aspects of the molecular epidemiology of S. epidermidis in PJIs were investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the pre- and perioperative measures required to reduce the incidence of S. epidermidis PJIs.

    In Paper I, S. epidermidis retrieved from air sampling in the operating field during arthroplasty was characterized by multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing. No isolates belonging to sequence types (STs) 2 and 215, previously associated with PJIs, were found in the air of the operating field. During air sampling, several Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates were identified, and as a spin-off of Paper I, the genomic relatedness of these isolates to S. pettenkoferi isolates from blood cultures was described in Paper II.

    In Paper III, genetic traits distinguishing S. epidermidis isolated from PJIs were determined using genome-wide association study accounting for population effects after whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of a population- based 10-year collection of S. epidermidis isolates from PJIs and of nasal isolates retrieved from patients scheduled for arthroplasty. Genes associated with antimicrobial agents used for prophylaxis in arthroplasty, i.e., beta-lactam antibiotics, aminoglycosides, and chlorhexidine, were associated with PJI origin. S. epidermidis from PJIs were dominated by the ST2a, ST2b, ST5, and ST215 lineages.

    In Paper IV, selective agar plates were used to investigate colonization with methicillin resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) in patients scheduled for arthroplasty. MRSE were further characterized by WGS. A subset of patients was found to harbour PJI-associated S. epidermidis lineages in their microbiota before hospitalization, but no isolates belonging to the ST2a lineage nor any rifampicin-resistant isolates were retrieved.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis in prosthetic joint infections
    Ladda ner (png)
    Bild
    Ladda ner (pdf)
    Cover
    Ladda ner (pdf)
    Spikblad
  • 9.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Västmanland – Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden.
    Bech Johannesen, Thor
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nilsdotter, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Stegger, Marc
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Genomic traits in Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with prosthetic joint infectionsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Region Västmanland - Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bech Johannesen, Thor
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Stegger, Marc
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Comparative genomics of Staphylococcus epidermidis from prosthetic: from prosthetic-joint infections and nares highlights genetic traits associated with antimicrobial resistance, not virulence2021Ingår i: Microbial Genomics, E-ISSN 2057-5858, Vol. 7, nr 2, artikel-id 000504Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increased awareness of the worldwide spread of specific epidemic multidrug-resistant (MDR) lineages of the human commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Here, using bioinformatic analyses accounting for population structure, we determined genomic traits (genes, SNPs and k-mers) that distinguish S. epidermidis causing prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs) from commensal isolates from nares, by analysing whole-genome sequencing data from S. epidermidis from PJIs prospectively collected over 10 years in Sweden, and contemporary S. epidermidis from the nares of patients scheduled for arthroplasty surgery. Previously suggested virulence determinants and the presence of genes and mutations linked to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) were also investigated. Publicly available S. epidermidis sequences were used for international extrapolation and validation of findings. Our data show that S. epidermidis causing PJIs differed from nasal isolates not by virulence but by traits associated with resistance to compounds used in prevention of PJIs: β-lactams, aminoglycosides and chlorhexidine. Almost a quarter of the PJI isolates did not belong to any of the previously described major nosocomial lineages, but the AMR-related traits were also over-represented in these isolates, as well as in international S. epidermidis isolates originating from PJIs. Genes previously associated with virulence in S. epidermidis were over-represented in individual lineages, but failed to reach statistical significance when adjusted for population structure. Our findings suggest that the current strategies for prevention of PJIs select for nosocomial MDR S. epidermidis lineages that have arisen from horizontal gene transfer of AMR-related traits into multiple genetic backgrounds. 

  • 11.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hellmark, Bengt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Stegger, Marc
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersen, Paal Skytt
    Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sundqvist, Martin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Genomic relatedness of Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates of different origins2017Ingår i: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 66, nr 5, s. 601-608Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to characterize clinical and environmental Staphylococcus pettenkoferi isolates with regard to genomic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR and core genome phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data verified the presence of distinct clades comprising closely related S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins.

    Methodology: Phylogenetic relationships between 25 S. pettenkoferi isolates collected from blood cultures and intra-operative air sampling were determined by repetitive-sequence-based PCR typing and analysis of similar to 157 000 SNPs identified in the core genome after WGS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing and tests for biofilm production (microtitre plate assay) were performed.

    Results: Repetitive-sequence-based PCR as well as WGS data demonstrated the close relatedness of clinically significant blood culture isolates to probable contaminants, as well as to environmental isolates. Antibiotic-susceptibility testing demonstrated a low level of antimicrobial resistance. The mecA gene was present in two cefoxitin-resistant isolates. No isolates were found to produce biofilm.

    Conclusion: Close genomic relatedness of S. pettenkoferi isolates from different geographical locations and origins were found within clades, but with substantial genomic difference between the two major clades. The ecological niche of S. pettenkoferi remains unconfirmed, but the presence of S. pettenkoferi in the air of the operating field favours the suggestion of a role in skin flora. Identification of S. pettenkoferi in clinical samples should, in a majority of cases, most likely be regarded as a probable contamination, and its role as a possible pathogen in immunocompromised hosts remains to be clarified.

  • 12.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Hellmark, Bengt
    Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Martin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning.
    Sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis associated with prosthetic joint infections are not present in the laminar airflow during prosthetic joint surgery2015Ingår i: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 123, nr 7, s. 589-595Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) has demonstrated a predominance of healthcare-associated multi-drug resistant sequence types (ST2 and ST215). How, and when, patients acquire these nosocomial STs is not known. The aim was to investigate if sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs are found in the air during prosthetic joint surgery. Air sampling was undertaken during 17 hip/knee arthroplasties performed in operating theaters equipped with mobile laminar airflow units in a 500-bed hospital in central Sweden. Species identification was performed using MALDI-TOF MS and 16S rRNA gene analysis. Isolates identified as S. epidermidis were further characterized by MLST and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Seven hundred and thirty-five isolates were available for species identification. Micrococcus spp. (n = 303) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 217) constituted the majority of the isolates. Thirty-two isolates of S. epidermidis were found. S. epidermidis isolates demonstrated a high level of allelic diversity with 18 different sequence types, but neither ST2 nor ST215 was found. Commensals with low pathogenic potential dominated among the airborne microorganisms in the operating field during prosthetic joint surgery. Nosocomial sequence types of S. epidermidis associated with PJIs were not found, and other routes of inoculation are therefore of interest in future studies.

  • 13.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Dept Lab Med,Clin Microbiol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Linköping Univ, Dept Infect Dis, Norrköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Norrköping, Sweden..
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Dept Lab Med,Clin Microbiol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Stegger, Marc
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Dept Lab Med,Clin Microbiol, Örebro, Sweden.;Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Comparative genomics of Staphylococcus epidermidis from prosthetic- joint infections and nares highlights genetic traits associated with antimicrobial resistance, not virulence2021Ingår i: Microbial Genomics, E-ISSN 2057-5858, Vol. 7, nr 2, artikel-id 000504Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increased awareness of the worldwide spread of specific epidemic multidrugresistant (MDR) lineages of the human commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Here, using bioinformatic analyses accounting for population structure, we determined genomic traits (genes, SNPs and k-mers) that distinguish S. epidermidis causing prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) from commensal isolates from nares, by analysing wholegenome sequencing data from S. epidermidis from PJIs prospectively collected over 10 years in Sweden, and contemporary S. epidermidis from the nares of patients scheduled for arthroplasty surgery. Previously suggested virulence determinants and the presence of genes and mutations linked to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) were also investigated. Publicly available S. epidermidis sequences were used for international extrapolation and validation of findings. Our data show that S. epidermidis causing PJIs differed from nasal isolates not by virulence but by traits associated with resistance to compounds used in prevention of PJIs: beta-lactams, aminoglycosides and chlorhexidine. Almost a quarter of the PJI isolates did not belong to any of the previously described major nosocomial lineages, but the AMRrelated traits were also overrepresented in these isolates, as well as in international S. epidermidis isolates originating from PJIs. Genes previously associated with virulence in S. epidermidis were overrepresented in individual lineages, but failed to reach statistical significance when adjusted for population structure. Our findings suggest that the current strategies for prevention of PJIs select for nosocomial MDR S. epidermidis lineages that have arisen from horizontal gene transfer of AMRrelated traits into multiple genetic backgrounds.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland Västerås, Region Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland Västerås, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sahdo, Berolla
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lower activation of caspase-1 by Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections compared to commensals2018Ingår i: Journal of bone and joint infection, ISSN 2206-3552, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 10-14Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nosocomial sequence types of Staphylococcus epidermidis dominate in prosthetic joint infections. We examined caspase-1 activation in human neutrophils after incubation with Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections and normal skin flora. Active caspase-1 was lower after incubation with isolates from prosthetic joint infections than after incubation with commensal isolates. Both host and isolate dependent differences in active caspase-1 were noted. Our results indicate that there might be a host-dependent incapacity to elicit a strong caspase-1 response towards certain strains of S. epidermidis. Further experiments with a larger number of individuals are warranted.

  • 15.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Region Västmanland, Västerås,Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Demirel, Isak
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Staphylococcus epidermidis from prosthetic joint infections induces lower IL-1 release from human neutrophils than isolates from normal flora2018Ingår i: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 126, nr 8, s. 678-684Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) differs from S.epidermidis isolated from normal flora in terms of its capacity to induce activation of caspase-1 and release of IL-1 in human neutrophils. The amount of active caspase-1 was determined over 6h by detecting Ac-YVAD-AMC fluorescence in human neutrophils incubated with S.epidermidis isolates from PJIs (ST2) or normal flora. The amount of IL-1 was detected by ELISA in neutrophil supernatants after 6h of incubation. Mean IL-1 release was lower after incubation with S.epidermidis from PJIs compared to isolates from normal flora, but no statistically significant difference was found in active caspase-1. Substantial inter-individual differences in both active caspase-1 and IL-1 were noted. These results suggest that evasion of innate immune response, measured as reduced capacity to induce release of IL-1 from human neutrophils, might be involved in the predominance of ST2 in S.epidermidis PJIs, but that other microbe-related factors are probably also important.

  • 16.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Centre for Clinical Research, Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Hospital of Västmanland, Västerås, Västerås, Sweden.
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Infectious Diseases, Karlstad Hospital and Centre for Clinical Research and Education, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sundqvist, Martin
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Stegger, Marc
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Lineages in the Nasal and Skin Microbiota of Patients Planned for Arthroplasty Surgery2021Ingår i: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 9, nr 2, artikel-id 265Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, ubiquitous in the human nasal and skin microbiota, is a common causative microorganism in prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). A high proportion of PJI isolates have been shown to harbor genetic traits associated with resistance to/tolerance of agents used for antimicrobial prophylaxis in joint arthroplasties. These traits were found within multidrug-resistant S. epidermidis (MDRSE) lineages of multiple genetic backgrounds. In this study, the aim was to study whether MDRSE lineages previously associated with PJIs are present in the nasal and skin microbiota of patients planned for arthroplasty surgery but before hospitalization. We cultured samples from nares, inguinal creases, and skin over the hip or knee (dependent on the planned procedure) taken two weeks (median) prior to admittance to the hospital for total joint arthroplasty from 66 patients on agar plates selecting for methicillin resistance. S. epidermidis colonies were identified and tested for the presence of mecA. Methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) were characterized by Illumina-based whole-genome sequencing. Using this method, we found that 30/66 (45%) of patients were colonized with MRSE at 1-3 body sites. A subset of patients, 10/66 (15%), were colonized with MDRSE lineages associated with PJIs. The qacA gene was identified in MRSE isolates from 19/30 (63%) of MRSE colonized patients, whereas genes associated with aminoglycoside resistance were less common, found in 11/30 (37%). We found that MDRSE lineages previously associated with PJIs were present in a subset of patients' pre-admission microbiota, plausibly in low relative abundance, and may be selected for by the current prophylaxis regimen comprising whole-body cleansing with chlorhexidine-gluconate containing soap. To further lower the rate of S. epidermidis PJIs, the current prophylaxis may need to be modified, but it is important for possible perioperative MDRSE transmission events and specific risk factors for MDRSE PJIs to be investigated before reevaluating antimicrobial prophylaxis. 

  • 17.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden..
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden.;Karlstad Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, SE-65182 Karlstad, Sweden.;Cty Council Varmland, Ctr Clin Res & Educ, SE-65182 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Linköping Univ, Dept Infect Dis, SE-60182 Norrköping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-60182 Norrköping, Sweden..
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sundqvist, Martin
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Clin Microbiol, Dept Lab Med, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden..
    Stegger, Marc
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden.;Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Clin Microbiol, Dept Lab Med, SE-70182 Örebro, Sweden..
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis Lineages in the Nasal and Skin Microbiota of Patients Planned for Arthroplasty Surgery2021Ingår i: Microorganisms, E-ISSN 2076-2607, Vol. 9, nr 2, artikel-id 265Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, ubiquitous in the human nasal and skin microbiota, is a common causative microorganism in prosthetic joint infections (PJIs). A high proportion of PJI isolates have been shown to harbor genetic traits associated with resistance to/tolerance of agents used for antimicrobial prophylaxis in joint arthroplasties. These traits were found within multidrug-resistant S. epidermidis (MDRSE) lineages of multiple genetic backgrounds. In this study, the aim was to study whether MDRSE lineages previously associated with PJIs are present in the nasal and skin microbiota of patients planned for arthroplasty surgery but before hospitalization. We cultured samples from nares, inguinal creases, and skin over the hip or knee (dependent on the planned procedure) taken two weeks (median) prior to admittance to the hospital for total joint arthroplasty from 66 patients on agar plates selecting for methicillin resistance. S. epidermidis colonies were identified and tested for the presence of mecA. Methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) were characterized by Illumina-based whole-genome sequencing. Using this method, we found that 30/66 (45%) of patients were colonized with MRSE at 1-3 body sites. A subset of patients, 10/66 (15%), were colonized with MDRSE lineages associated with PJIs. The qacA gene was identified in MRSE isolates from 19/30 (63%) of MRSE colonized patients, whereas genes associated with aminoglycoside resistance were less common, found in 11/30 (37%). We found that MDRSE lineages previously associated with PJIs were present in a subset of patients' pre-admission microbiota, plausibly in low relative abundance, and may be selected for by the current prophylaxis regimen comprising whole-body cleansing with chlorhexidine-gluconate containing soap. To further lower the rate of S. epidermidis PJIs, the current prophylaxis may need to be modified, but it is important for possible perioperative MDRSE transmission events and specific risk factors for MDRSE PJIs to be investigated before reevaluating antimicrobial prophylaxis.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 18.
    Månsson, Emeli
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Västmanland – Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Västerås, Västerås, Sweden..
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Karlstad Hospital and Centre for Clinical Research, County Countil of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Department of Infectious Diseases, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Stegger, Marc
    Department of Bacteria, Parasites and Fungi, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis lineages in the nasal and skin microbiota of patients scheduled for arthroplasty surgeryManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 19.
    Rashid-Abdi, Mulki
    et al.
    Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Infect Dis, Västerås, Sweden..
    Krifors, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Infect Dis, Västerås, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sälléber, Andreas
    Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Clin Microbiol, Västerås, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Jenny
    Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Clin Microbiol, Västerås, Sweden..
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Infect Dis, Västerås, Sweden..
    Low rate of COVID-19 seroconversion in health-care workers at a Department of Infectious Diseases in Sweden during the later phase of the first wave; a prospective longitudinal seroepidemiological study2021Ingår i: Infectious Diseases, ISSN 2374-4235, E-ISSN 2374-4243, Vol. 53, nr 3, s. 169-175Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health-care workers are at risk of contracting and transmitting SARS-CoV-2. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies and the rate of seroconversion in an environment with high exposure to SARS-CoV-2.

    Methods: 131 health-care workers at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Vasteras, Sweden, were included in the study. Abbott's SARS-COV-2 IgG immunoassay was used with a signal cut-off ratio of >= 1.4. Every third week from the beginning of May, blood samples were drawn, and the participants completed a questionnaire regarding symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and the result of any SARS-CoV-2 PCR performed since the last sampling occasion. Participants with IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were re-sampled only on the sixth and last occasion.

    Results: At the start of the study, 18 (15%) participants had SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. At the end, 25 (19%) of 131 participants were seropositive. One case of asymptomatic infection was detected, and two cases with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 did not develop IgG antibodies.

    Conclusion: The low rate of seroconversion during the study suggests that it is possible to prevent transmission of SARS-COV-2 in a high-exposure environment. Compliance with adequate infection control guidelines is the likely explanation of our findings.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Rendboe, Amalie Katrine
    et al.
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Johannesen, Thor Bech
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ingham, Anna Cäcilia
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Iversen, Søren
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Baig, Sharmin
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Edslev, Sofie
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jensen, Jørgen Skov
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersen, Paal Skytt
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stegger, Marc
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Bacteria Parasites & Fungi, Copenhagen, Denmark; Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    The Epidome: a species-specific approach to assess the population structure and heterogeneity of Staphylococcus epidermidis colonization and infection2020Ingår i: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikel-id 362Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although generally known as a human commensal, Staphylococcus epidermidis is also an opportunistic pathogen that can cause nosocomial infections related to foreign body materials and immunocompromized patients. Infections are often caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) lineages that are difficult and costly to treat, and can have a major adverse impact on patients’ quality of life. Heterogeneity is a common phenomenon in both carriage and infection, but present methodology for detection of this is laborious or expensive.

    In this study, we present a culture-independent method, labelled Epidome, based on an amplicon sequencing-approach to deliver information beyond species level on primary samples and to elucidate clonality, population structure and temporal stability or niche selection of S. epidermidis communities.

    Results

    Based on an assessment of > 800 genes from the S. epidermidis core genome, we identified genes with variable regions, which in combination facilitated the differentiation of phylogenetic clusters observed in silico, and allowed classification down to lineage level. A duplex PCR, combined with an amplicon sequencing protocol, and a downstream analysis pipeline were designed to provide subspecies information from primary samples. Additionally, a probe-based qPCR was designed to provide valuable absolute abundance quantification of S. epidermidis. The approach was validated on isolates representing skin commensals and on genomic mock communities with a sensitivity of < 10 copies/μL. The method was furthermore applied to a sample set of primary skin and nasal samples, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the S. epidermidis populations. Additionally, the qPCR showed a high degree of variation in absolute abundance of S. epidermidis.

    Conclusions

    The Epidome method is designed for use on primary samples to obtain important information on S. epidermidis abundance and diversity beyond species-level to answer questions regarding the emergence and dissemination of nosocomial lineages, investigating clonality of S. epidermidis communities, population dynamics, and niche selection. Our targeted-sequencing method allows rapid differentiation and identification of clinically important nosocomial lineages in low-biomass samples such as skin samples.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 21.
    Salih, Lavin
    et al.
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tevell, Staffan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Karlstad Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Region Västmanland, Västerås, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Hospital of Västmanland, Uppsala University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Åsa
    Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hellmark, Bengt
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län.
    Söderquist, Bo
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper.
    Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from nares and prosthetic joint infections are mupirocin susceptible2018Ingår i: Journal of bone and joint infection, ISSN 2206-3552, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 1-4Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility including mupirocin among Staphylococcus. epidermidis isolated from prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) (n=183) and nasal isolates (n=75) from patients intended to undergo prosthetic joint replacements. Susceptibility to mupirocin (used for eradication of nasal carriership of Staphylococcus aureus) was investigated by gradient test, and susceptibility to various other antimicrobial agents was investigated by disc diffusion test. All isolates, except three from PJIs and one from the nares, were fully susceptible to mupirocin. Multi-drug resistance (≥3 antibiotic classes) was found in 154/183 (84.2%) of the PJI isolates but only in 2/75 (2.7%) of the nares isolates, indicating that S. epidermidis causing PJIs do not originate from the nares.

  • 22.
    Sjostrom, Bjorn
    et al.
    Västerås Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, S-72189 Västerås, Sweden..
    Månsson, Emeli
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Västerås Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Västerås, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Kamienny, Josefin Viklund
    Västerås Hosp, Dept Med, Div Cardiol, Västerås, Sweden..
    Östberg, Erland
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning, Västerås. Västerås Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia & Intens Care, S-72189 Västerås, Sweden.
    Characteristics and definitive outcomes of COVID-19 patients admitted to a secondary hospital intensive care unit in Sweden2021Ingår i: Health Science Reports, E-ISSN 2398-8835, Vol. 4, nr 4, artikel-id e446Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims

    Most published reports of COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients are from large tertiary hospitals and often present short-term or incomplete outcome data. There are reports indicating that ICUs with fewer beds are associated with higher mortality. This study aimed to investigate the definitive outcome and patient characteristics of the complete first wave of COVID-19 patients admitted to ICU in a secondary hospital.

    Methods

    In this prospective observational study, all patients with respiratory failure and a positive SARS-CoV-2 test admitted to Vasteras Hospital ICU between 24 March and July 22, 2020 were included. The primary outcome was defined as 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, number of days with invasive ventilation, need for vasopressors/inotropes, and use of renal replacement therapy.

    Results

    Fifty-three patients were included. Median age (range) was 59 (33-76) and 74% were men. Obesity and hypertension were the most common comorbidities and 45% of the patients were born outside Europe. Ninety-day mortality was 30%. Median ICU length of stay (interquartile range) was 14 (5-24) days and the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation 16 (12-26) days. No patients received dialysis at 90-day follow-up.

    Conclusion

    In this cohort of COVID-19 patients treated in a secondary hospital ICU, mortality rates were low compared to early studies from China, Italy, and the United States, but similar to other government-funded hospitals in Scandinavia. A preparatory reorganization enabled an increase in ICU capacity, hence avoiding an overwhelmed intensive care organization.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Sjöström, Björn
    et al.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Månsson, Emeli
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Infectious Diseases, Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Viklund Kamienny, Josefin
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Östberg, Erland
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden; Region Västmanland-Uppsala University, Centre for Clinical Research, Västerås Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Characteristics and definitive outcomes of COVID-19 patients admitted to a secondary hospital intensive care unit in Sweden2021Ingår i: Health Science Reports, E-ISSN 2398-8835, Vol. 4, nr 4, artikel-id e446Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Most published reports of COVID-19 Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients are from large tertiary hospitals and often present short-term or incomplete outcome data. There are reports indicating that ICUs with fewer beds are associated with higher mortality. This study aimed to investigate the definitive outcome and patient characteristics of the complete first wave of COVID-19 patients admitted to ICU in a secondary hospital.

    Methods: In this prospective observational study, all patients with respiratory failure and a positive SARS-CoV-2 test admitted to Västerås Hospital ICU between 24 March and July 22, 2020 were included. The primary outcome was defined as 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, number of days with invasive ventilation, need for vasopressors/inotropes, and use of renal replacement therapy.

    Results: Fifty-three patients were included. Median age (range) was 59 (33-76) and 74% were men. Obesity and hypertension were the most common comorbidities and 45% of the patients were born outside Europe. Ninety-day mortality was 30%. Median ICU length of stay (interquartile range) was 14 (5-24) days and the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation 16 (12-26) days. No patients received dialysis at 90-day follow-up.

    Conclusion: In this cohort of COVID-19 patients treated in a secondary hospital ICU, mortality rates were low compared to early studies from China, Italy, and the United States, but similar to other government-funded hospitals in Scandinavia. A preparatory reorganization enabled an increase in ICU capacity, hence avoiding an overwhelmed intensive care organization.

1 - 23 av 23
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf