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  • 1. Löfdahl, Annica
    et al.
    Hägglund, Solveig
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Förskolebarns sociala kunskapsdomäner - ett sätt att tillsammans förstå, hantera och ordna den sociala vardagen2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Ribaeus, Katarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Analysing conditional participation in preschool2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ribaeus, Katarina
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Preschool Children as Democratic Subjects: Agents of Democracy2019In: Challenging Democracy in Early Childhood Education: Engagement in Changing Global Contexts / [ed] Valerie Margrain & Annica Löfdahl Hultman, Singapore: Springer, 2019, 1, p. 233-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, we focus on children’s democratic practices in two Swedish preschool settings, drawing on the child dimension in the theoretical model presented in the introduction of this book. The specific aim is to contribute knowledge about children’s own constructions of democracy. Our research questions are the following: How do children negotiate democracy, and what does this entail? The chapter takes its point of departure in the intersection between our previous dissertations (Ribaeus K, Demokratiuppdrag i förskolan [Democratic mission in preschool]. Doctoral dissertation, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden, 2014; Skånfors L, Barns sociala vardagsliv i förskolan [Children’s everyday social life in preschool]. Doctoral dissertation, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden, 2013) which in different ways have focused questions about 3- to 5-year-old preschool children’s agency and influence and preschool teachers’ democratic practice. The empirical material consists of reanalysed data from our dissertations. We use the model Institutional Events of Democracy (Ribaeus K, Demokratiuppdrag i förskolan [Democratic mission in preschool]. Doctoral dissertation, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden, 2014) to identify and understand children’s constructions of democracy. The results show how children in various ways construct and negotiate democracy in terms of participation, power relations and through political influence, illustrating children as democratic subjects and agents of democracy. We conclude by arguing a need for a more explicit emphasis on democracy in early childhood education.

  • 4.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Barn som 'minor politics' i förskolan2009In: Det politiska barnet: bidrag till utforskandet av barn och barndom som politiska kategorier / [ed] Saar, Tomas; Hägglund, Solveig; Löfdahl, Annica, Karlstad: Estetisk-filosofiska fakulteten, Pedagogik, Karlstads universitet , 2009, no 2009:39, p. 27-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.
    Barns samtal om etablerade relationer, rätt ålder och att vara duktigManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies.
    Barns sociala vardagsliv i förskolan2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching aim of the studies in this dissertation is to contribute knowledge about children’s shared social knowledge in their preschool peer cultures, regarding both content and how it is established and maintained.

    An ethnographic approach has been used to study the shared activities of children, aged 3-5, in the preschool. During 1 ½ years, one preschool setting was visited on a regular basis. One hundred hours of observation have been made and documented through video camera recordings and field notes. The theory of children’s peer cultures (Corsaro, 2005), positioning theory (Harré & Langenhove, 1999a) and social representation theory (Moscovici, 2001) have been used as theoretical tools in the analyses.

    The empirical results are presented in four articles (articles I-IV) and are all illustrations of the children’s shared social knowledge. The findings are that children’s shared social knowledge involves two main aspects of knowledge about relations; how to establish and maintain relations vis-à-vis various tokens or social resources (articles III and IV), and how to create distance to relations (articles I and II). Another find is that there seems to be a tension between the children’s social knowledge and the social norms explicitly formulated in the studied preschool context.

     

     

  • 7.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Ethics in child research: Children's agency and researchers' 'ethical radar'2009In: Childhoods Today, ISSN 1753-0849, E-ISSN 1753-0849, Vol. 3, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reflects on ethical dilemmas encountered during a study with 2–5-year-old children in preschool. A brief overview of the ethical research field indicates that discussions mostly revolve around problems of the consent process. Empirical illustrations are given and discussed in an endeavour to contribute to knowledge within this field. The conclusion is that ‘ethical radars’ are necessary throughout the research process, as children seem to have other ways of expressing acceptance and rejection/withdrawal than just verbally.

  • 8.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Tokens, peer context and mobility in preschool children's positioning work2010In: Nordisk Barnehageforskning, ISSN 1890-9167, E-ISSN 1890-9167, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 41-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about the positioning work of preschool children. Ethnographic observations were made of interactions among 2–5-year-olds in their preschool setting. In the analysis, Corsaro’s theoretical framework of children’s peer cultures and positioning theory as described by Harré & Langenhove were used. Results show that children share knowledge concerning their social positions in the peer group as built up, negotiable and possible to move between in relation to various ‘tokens’, namely established relationship, proper age and specific competence, all of which change in relevance depending on the actual peer context and activity.

  • 9.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Löfdahl, Annica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Preschool children's shared knowledge about age and the relation between the right to join and the right to 'say no'2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Löfdahl, Annica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Vilken tur att vi har dig, du som är så stor!: En studie om förskolebarn och tolkande reproduktion2007In: KAPET, Karlstads universitets pedagogiska tidskriftArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Skånfors, Lovisa
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Löfdahl, Annica
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Hägglund, Solveig
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Department of Education.
    Hidden spaces and places in the preschool: Withdrawal strategies in preschool children's peer cultures2009In: Journal of Early Childhood Research, ISSN 1476-718X, E-ISSN 1741-2927, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 94-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses how children make use of their preschool contex tin order to withdraw. Ethnographic observations were made of two- to five-year-old children’s interactions during free play and teacher-led activities in the preschool, and documentation was carried out through fieldnotes and video recordings. The empirical material was analysed using Corsaro’s theory on children’s peer cultures. Results show that children, in their peer cultures, construct withdrawal strategies – ‘making oneself inaccessible’ and ‘creating and protecting shared hidden spaces’ – by making use of the preschool’s organization of time and space.

1 - 11 of 11
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  • apa
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