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  • 1.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parent's reactions to adolescents' problematic behaviors2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional socialization theories suggest that parents shape their children, and parents’ socialization strategies are decided upon largely independent of the children. These ideas, however, have received criticism. In this dissertation, I focus on how children and adolescents influence their parents’ behaviors. Specifically, I examine parents’ reactions to problematic behaviors in their adolescents. In the three studies, I presented theoretical models that offered explanations why parents react as they do to problematic behaviors in their adolescents. In these models, parents’ cognitions worked as mechanisms to explain their subsequent reactions. The overall pattern in the studies was that parents tended to shift in cognitions about their own role as parents and their adolescents’ behaviors when they were faced with problematic behaviors, which influenced their behaviors toward their adolescents. In Study I, parents became less strictly opposed to adolescent drinking when they encountered their adolescents intoxicated. This reaction was explained by a reduction in dissonance between their attitudes to adolescent drinking and their knowledge of their own adolescents’ drinking. In Study II and Study III, parents of adolescents with hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems (HIA) reported that their adolescents did not respond to their attempts to correct their behaviors. This cognition made them feel powerless and, as a consequence, they increased in negative behaviors and decreased in positive parenting strategies. In these two studies, parents decreased in their thoughts of being able to deal with their adolescents’ misbehaviors. In addition, as was shown in the third study, these cognitions seem to be influenced by parents’ earlier experiences with their first-born children. In sum, the results of this dissertation suggest that adolescents influence their parents’ cognitions and behaviors. Further, the results highlight the importance of focusing on how parents’ ways of thinking influence their parenting strategies.

  • 2.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Actor- and Partner-Effects among Mothers and Fathers’ Parental Self-efficacy, Marital Satisfaction, and Depressive Symptoms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Change and Predictors of Change in Parental Self-Efficacy from Early to Middle Adolescence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, United States.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, United States.
    Change and predictors of change in parental self-efficacy from early to middle adolescence2015In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 1367-1379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE) describes parents' beliefs about being able to handle developmentally specific issues and being able to influence their child in a way that fosters the child's positive development and adjustment (Bandura, 1997). Parents of adolescents have been shown to feel less efficacious than parents of preadolescent children (Ballenski & Cook, 1982), but little is known about the factors behind low levels of PSE among parents of adolescents. This study examined mean-level changes in PSE and predictors of change among parents of adolescents. The sample was derived from a 3-wave longitudinal data set of 398 parents of children starting spanning early (11 or 12 years) to middle (14 or 15 years) adolescence (47% boys). Latent growth curve analysis was performed, and it was hypothesized that theoretically driven predictors reflecting the developing child, as well as the ecological context, would predict the level of PSE. Despite generally high levels of PSE across all time points, parents decreased in PSE during the developmental period. Some predictors were of particular importance for the level and amount of change in PSE, such as physical changes in the child, parents' target-based expectations for risk taking during adolescence, the quality of parent-adolescent communication, and ethnicity. This study adds insight into the development of PSE during the critical transitional period of early and middle adolescence. The findings advance theory of PSE, as it illuminates why some parents' decrease in PSE more than do other parents.

  • 5.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Change and Predictors of Change in Parental Self-Efficacy from Early to Middle Adolescence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, United States.
    Over-Time Associations Among Parental Self-Efficacy, Promotive Parenting Practices, and Adolescents’ Externalizing Behaviors2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, United States.
    Over-time associations among parental self-efficacy, promotive parenting practices, and adolescents' externalizing behaviors2015In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 427-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE) is defined as parents' beliefs about their abilities to influence their children in a way that fosters their children's positive development. Research has shown links among PSE, parenting, and children's behavior (Jones & Prinz, 2005), but there are still questions concerning the associations over time. Theory predicts 3 types of processes relevant to these associations: a PSE-driven process, a parent-behavior-driven process, and a child-driven process. In this study, we tested these processes during early to middle adolescence using reports from 401 parents (286 mothers, 115 fathers) from 305 families, and their adolescents (M-age = 11.5 years), at 3 time points. Cross-lagged panel models were used to examine the associations among PSE, promotive parenting practices, and adolescents' externalizing. Results supported a PSE-driven process for mothers within early adolescence. In addition, evidence for parent-behavior-driven and child-driven processes emerged at different times within this developmental period.

  • 8.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Cotter, Allison
    Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn AL, USA.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Adolescents' Behaviors as Moderators for the Link between Parental Self-Efficacy and Parenting Practices2017In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 989-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on theory that parents with higher levels of self-efficacy (PSE) should find it easier to parent effectively in the face of challenging child behaviors than should parents with lower levels of PSE, this study examines the link between PSE and parenting using children's behaviors as potential moderators. Participants were 130 parents who had an older adolescent (M (age) = 17.58) in addition to the target adolescent (M (age) = 11.79), and both adolescents' externalizing behaviors were used as moderators for the link between PSE and parenting of the target adolescent. Path analysis in Mplus showed that higher PSE was linked to more promotive parenting but only among parents who had an older adolescent with lower levels of externalizing behaviors. Among parents of adolescents with higher levels of externalizing behaviors, whose promotive parenting was significantly lower than other parents overall, PSE did not predict promotive parenting. The link between PSE and parenting did not differ depending on the target adolescents' behavior. Findings suggest that the link between parents' beliefs and parenting depends on the broader family context. More specifically, how PSE is linked to parenting practices depends at least partly on the experiences that parents bring from parenting an older adolescent to their interactions with a later-born adolescent. From a clinical perspective, parents might need guidance in how to think about their earlier parenting experiences when parenting a younger adolescent.

  • 9.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crowe, Elizabeth
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Buchanan, Christy
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Internet-specific parental self-efficacy: Developmental differences and links to Internet-specific mediation2018In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 84, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most children spend significant time on the Internet every day, and parents have an important role in helping their children to avoid negative online experiences.  In this study, we examine the potential role of Internet-specific parental self-efficacy (Internet-specific PSE) as an antecedent for Internet-specific parenting practices.  A study of 1025 parents of children in grades 6 (approximately 11-12 years) to 12 (approximately 17-18 years) allowed us to examine the links among Internet-specific PSE, the child’s grade in school, and Internet-specific parenting practices.  The results showed developmental decreases in Internet-specific PSE and Internet-specific parenting practices: Parents of older adolescents felt less efficacious and used less control-based parenting practices than did parents of younger adolescents.  Furthermore, Internet-specific PSE was a significant predictor of Internet-specific parenting practices (both communication-based and control-based practices).  These results suggest the importance of both parental beliefs and children’s grade in school for parenting in the area of children’s online activities. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-07-31 13:42
  • 10.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Crowne, E.
    Buchanan, C.M.
    Parents’ role in children’s Internet use2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dahl, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The role of family experiences for adolescents’ readiness to use and participate in illegal political activity2016In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used reactance theory as a starting point to explain what role a perceived undemocratic and controlling family has for adolescents’ attitudes toward illegal political activity. We also examined whether adolescents’ readiness to use illegal political means was related to actual political behavior, which has been lacking in research. Data came from a longitudinal two age-cohort sample of 720 adolescents (MC1 = 13.44; MC2 = 16.62) collected in a mid-sized city in Sweden. Results showed that adolescents who perceived their families as undemocratic and controlling increased in readiness to use illegal political means over time. In addition, older adolescents’ attitudes were associated with actual political behavior. This highlights the role a perceived family environment has on adolescents’ political identity development in today’s democratic societies.

  • 12.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Koning, Ina M.
    Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    The Outcomes of an Alcohol Prevention Program on Parents' Rule Setting and Self-efficacy: a Bidirectional Model2016In: Prevention Science, ISSN 1389-4986, E-ISSN 1573-6695, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most adolescents have their first encounter with alcohol in early or middle adolescence. Parents' rule setting about alcohol has been shown to be important to delay the onset and reduce the frequency of adolescents' alcohol drinking, but less is known about the potential role of parents' beliefs about their competence in and ability to influence their adolescents' drinking habits (i.e., parental self-efficacy [PSE], Bandura (Psychological Review, 84, 191-215, 1977). In this study, we examined the direction of influence between parents' rule setting and PSE as outcomes of the program "Prevention of Alcohol use in Students" (PAS), a prevention program aiming to reduce underage drinking by targeting parents and adolescents both separately and in a combined intervention. We tested two mediation processes in which the program would (a) have a direct effect on PSE, which in turn would increase parents' rule setting or (b) have a direct effect on parents' rule setting, which in turn would increase PSE. To examine these processes, we used a sample of 2562 parent-adolescent dyads (age 12 at baseline), followed annually over 3 years. The results showed that the combined intervention increased PSE via an increase in parents' rule setting. No significant effect of the intervention on rules about alcohol via PSE was found. This is the first study to test the mediation processes involving PSE and parental rule setting in an experimental context where parenting practices are being actively changed. The results suggest that giving parents concrete advice on how to deal with alcohol drinking in their adolescents and at the same time helping adolescents to develop healthy attitudes about alcohol drinking have a positive influence on parents' self-efficacy.

  • 13.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Violence in Family Sub-Systems: Links to Peer Victimization and Long-Term Emotional and Behavioral Problems2019In: Journal of family Violence, ISSN 0885-7482, E-ISSN 1573-2851, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 423-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although childhood violence by any person is negative for children, little is known about whether violence by different family members is linked differently to problems in young adulthood, as family relationships might play different roles in children’s individual development. In this study, we examine parent and sibling violence and associations with emotional and behavioral problems, directly and indirectly via peer victimization. We used retrospective reports from 347 young adults (aged 20–24) who all reported childhood family physical violence, and we performed a path analysis using Mplus. The results showed that participants who had been victimized by a sibling only or by both a sibling and parent were more likely to report peer victimization than were participants who had been victimized by parents only. Peer victimization was, in turn, linked to more aggres- sion, criminality, and anxiety. Theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  • 14.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Lippold, Melissa
    School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Jensen, Todd
    School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Fosco, Greg
    Human Development and Family Studies and The Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Feinberg, Mark
    College of Health and Human Development and The Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Hostile interactions in the family: Patterns and links to youth externalizing problems2019In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 56-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with family systems theory, we examined patterns of hostile interactions within families and their associations with externalizing problems among early-adolescent children. Using hostility scores based on observational data of six dyadic interactions during a triadic interaction (n = 462; i.e., child-to-mother, mother-to-child, child-to-father, father-to-child, mother-to-father, father-to-mother)—latent profile analysis supported three distinct profiles of hostility. The low/moderate hostile profile included families with the lowest levels of hostility across dyads; families in the mutual parent-child hostileprofile scored higher on parent-child hostility, but lower on interparental hostility; the hostile parentprofile showed higher levels of parent-to-child and interparental hostility, but lower child-to-parent hostility. Concerning links to youth outcomes, youth in the mutual parent-child hostile profile reported the highest level of externalizing problems, both concurrently and longitudinally. These results point to the importance of examining larger family patterns of hostility to fully understand the association between family hostility and youth adjustment.

  • 15.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Exploring parents' experiences and reactions to adolescents' hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems2013In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1030-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents' hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems (HIA) have been shown to make parents feel powerless. In this study, the authors examined whether these feelings were dependent on parents' experiences with their older children. Two models that offer different predictions of how parents make use of their earlier experiences when raising their later-born children were explored: the learning-from-experience model and the spillover model. The authors used reports from 372 parents with 1 child (M-age=11.92) and 198 parents with 2 children (M-age=11.89 and 14.35) from a small town in a European country. The results did not support a learning-from-experience process. Instead, consistent with a spillover process, parents felt particularly powerless about their younger children with HIA if they also felt powerless about their older children. This study suggests that parents' experiences of raising their older children are important for their reactions to HIA in their younger children.

  • 16.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The influence of an older child’s problematic behavior on parents’ reactions to their younger child’s problematic behavior2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A test of cognitive dissonance theory to explain parents’ reactions to youths’ alcohol intoxicationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Studies have shown that parents reduce control and support in response to youths’ drinking. Why they react this way, however, is still much unknown. From cognitive dissonance theory, we derived hypotheses about parents’ reactions.

    Methods:

    We used a longitudinal, school-based sample of 494 youths (13 and 14 years, 56% boys) and their parents. General Linear Model (GLM) analyses were used to test the main hypotheses.

    Results:

    In accord with our hypotheses, parents who encountered their youths intoxicated became less opposed to underage drinking over time. In addition, parents who remained strongly opposed to youth drinking experienced more worries than parents who became less opposed. Alternative explanations for the results were tested, but were not supported.

    Conclusions:

    The findings suggest that to eliminate the dissonance between their strict attitudes against youth drinking and their knowledge of their own youths’ drinking, parents changed their attitudes and became more lenient.

  • 18.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    A test of cognitive dissonance theory to explain parents' reactions to youths' alcohol intoxication2012In: Family Relations, ISSN 0197-6664, E-ISSN 1741-3729, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 629-641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown that parents reduce control and support in response to youths' drinking. Why they react this way, however, is still unknown. From cognitive dissonance theory, we derived hypotheses about parents' reactions. We used a longitudinal, school-based sample of 494 youths (13 and 14 years, 56% boys) and their parents. General Linear Model (GLM) analyses were used to test the main hypotheses. In accord with our hypotheses, parents who encountered their youths intoxicated became less opposed to underage drinking over time. In addition, parents who remained strongly opposed to youth drinking experienced more worries than parents who became less opposed. Alternative explanations for the results were tested, but were not supported. The findings suggest that to eliminate the dissonance between their strict attitudes against youth drinking and their knowledge of their own youths' drinking, parents changed their attitudes and became more lenient.

  • 19.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parents’ reactions to adolescents’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems: do their experiences of having raised a child before matter?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents learn from their experiences of having raised a child before, but it is unknown if it makes them better to deal with challenging behaviors in their later-born children. Some behaviors are particularly difficult to handle, such as Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems (HIA), which have been shown to make parents feel powerless. In this study, we examined if these feelings were dependent on parents’ experiences with their older children. Two models were examined, the learning-from-experience model and the spillover model, which make different predictions of how parents make use of their earlier experiences when they raise their later-born children. We used reports from 372 parents who had one child (M = 11.92 years), and 198 parents who had two children (M = 11.89 and 14.35 years). In agreement with Bugental’s parental attribution model, HIA was associated with parents’ feelings of powerlessness among parents who both had and those who had not raised a child before. Further, we did not find empirical support for the learning-from-experience model — parents felt powerless about their younger children with HIA even if they had raised a child before with HIA. However, consistent with the spillover hypothesis, parents felt particularly powerless about their younger children with HIA if they also felt powerless about their older children. These findings highlight the importance of acknowledging parents’ experiences with their older children in research and clinical settings.

  • 20.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parents’ reactions to youths’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems2011In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1125-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems(HIA) in children and adolescents are stressful for parents. In this study, we used theories of parents’ perceived power and attributions for youths’ behaviors to develop a model to understand parents’ reactions to their youths’ HIA. We followed 706 youths (376 boys and 330 girls, aged 10–12 years at T1) and their parents in a community-based project over 5 years. Measures of youths’ HIA, youths’ unresponsiveness to correction, parents’ feelings of powerlessness, parental monitoring, and parents’ negative behaviors toward their youths, were used. HIA in youths predicted increases in parents’ perceptions that their youths were unresponsive to correction, which in turn prompted parents to feel more powerless over time. Further, parents’ feelings of powerlessness were associated with increases in negative parenting behaviors over time. These results indicate a movement to more negative parenting practices over time as a result of youths’ HIA.

  • 21.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Understanding why parents give up when they encounter problematic youth adjustment2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Understanding Why Parents Give Up When They Encounter Problematic Youth Adjustment2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Glatz, Terese
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Trifan, Tatiana Alina
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Examination of Parental Self-Efficacy and Their Beliefs About the Outcomes of Their Parenting Practices2019In: Journal of Family Issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1321-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined parental self-efficacy (PSE) in light of Bandura's distinction between efficacy expectations and outcome expectations, and their links to parenting practices. We used a sample of 968 parents of children aged 11 to 18 years and examined the factor structure of items measuring PSE and parents' outcome expectations, as well as the links between these two cognitive aspects and parenting practices. The results suggested that PSE and our measure of parents' outcome expectations constituted two distinct factors and were not part of the same overall factor. Additionally, the analyses showed that PSE might be seen as a unidimensional construct with multidimensional aspects and was more strongly linked to parenting practices than were parents' outcome expectations. In general, this study offers a comprehensive model of two different parental cognitive mechanisms as antecedents of parenting behaviors in different developmental periods.

  • 24.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Utsatthet för våld inom familjen2019In: Barns och ungas utsatthet / [ed] B. Johansson & Å. Källström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, p. 21-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jonhed, Anna L
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Källström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Utmaningar i relationsbaserat arbete med barn och föräldrar som lever med våld i familjen2018In: Relationer i socialt arbete : I gränslandet mellan profession och person / [ed] Bruhn, Anders & Källström, Åsa, Liber, 2018, p. 138-153Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kiang, Lisa
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Buchanan, Christy M.
    Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC, USA.
    Acculturation Conflict, Cultural Parenting Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Parenting Competence in Asian American and Latino/a Families2017In: Family Process, ISSN 0014-7370, E-ISSN 1545-5300, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 943-961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents from immigrant backgrounds must deal with normative parenting demands as well as unique challenges associated with acculturation processes. The current study examines the independent and interactive influences of acculturation conflict and cultural parenting self-efficacy (PSE; e.g., parents' confidence in instilling heritage, American, and bicultural values in their children) on perceptions of general parenting competence. Using data from 58 Asian American and 153 Latin American parents of children in grades 6-12, ethnic differences were also explored. Results suggest that lower acculturation conflict is associated with higher perceptions of general parenting competence for both Asian and Latin American parents. Higher cultural PSE is associated with higher perceived general parenting competence for Latino/a parents only. One significant interaction was found, and only for Asian Americans, whereby the negative association between acculturation conflict and perceptions of parenting competence was weaker for those who felt efficacious in transmitting heritage messages. Results are discussed in light of clinical implications and the need for further recognition and study of culturally relevant factors and frameworks among families from immigrant backgrounds.

  • 27.
    Koning, Ina M.
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    van den Eijnden, Regina J.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vollebergh, Wilma A.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Don't Worry! Parental Worries, Alcohol-Specific Parenting and Adolescents' Drinking2013In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, ISSN 0147-5916, E-ISSN 1573-2819, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1079-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study precursors (risk behavior, parental self-efficacy and parental awareness) of parental worries about their child's behavior during adolescence (12-16 years) were examined. To this end, a new measure of parental worries about the child's involvement in risk behavior is developed. Second, the effect of parental worries on adolescents' alcohol use was tested and third whether ineffective alcohol-specific parenting mediated this effect. Longitudinal data including four waves from 703 parent-adolescent (M age = 12.2 years, SD = 0.5) dyads were used to conduct latent path and growth analysis in Mplus. Results showed that parental awareness, confidence in the effectiveness of their parenting practices and adolescent risk behavior at age 12 related to higher levels of worries in parents. Furthermore, more parental worries predicted an increase in adolescents' drinking (slope), yet worries did not predict the amount of drinking at age 12 (intercept). In addition, parental worries predicted less restrictive rule setting and a lower quality of communication. This ineffective parenting accounted for the effect of parental worries on adolescent alcohol use. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that worries about risk behavior of their child uniquely contribute to higher drinking rates due to less effective parenting. These findings implicate that alcohol interventions should provide parents with effective leads to tackle the drinking behavior in their children (e.g. strict rules about alcohol).

  • 28.
    Källström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Thunberg, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Physical Violence in Family Sub-Systems: Links to Peer Victimization and Long-Term Emotional and Behavioral Problems2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although childhood violence by any person is negative for children little is known about whether violence by different family members is linked differently to problems in young adulthood as family relationships might play different roles in children’s individual development. In this study we examine parent and sibling violence and associations with emotional and behavioral problems directly and indirectly via peer victimization. We used retrospective reports from 347 young adults (aged 20–24) who all reported childhood family physical violence and we performed a path analysis using Mplus. The results showed that participants who had been victimized by a sibling only or by both a sibling and parent were more likely to report peer victimization than were participants who had been victimized by parents only. Peer 127 victimization was in turn linked to more aggression criminality and anxiety. Theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  • 29.
    Lippold, Melissa A
    et al.
    School of Social Work, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC, USA.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fosco, Gregory M
    Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA, USA.
    Feinberg, Mark E
    Prevention Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, Old Main PA, USA.
    Parental perceived control and social support: linkages to change in parenting behaviors during early adolescence2018In: Family Process, ISSN 0014-7370, E-ISSN 1545-5300, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 432-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior studies have found that parents' perceptions of control over their lives and their social support may both be important for parenting behaviors. Yet, few studies have examined their unique and interacting influence on parenting behaviors during early adolescence. This longitudinal study of rural parents in two-parent families (N = 636) investigated (a) whether perceived control and social support when their youth were in sixth grade were independently or interactively associated with changes in parenting behaviors (discipline, standard setting) and parent-child warmth and hostility 6 months later and (b) if these linkages differed by parent gender. We also investigated the interactive links between perceived control, social support, and parenting. Specifically, we tested if parents' perceived control moderated the linkages between social support and parenting and if these linkages differed by parent gender. Greater perceived control predicted more increases in parents' consistent discipline and standard setting, whereas greater social support predicted increases in parent-child warmth and decreases in parent-child hostility. Parental perceived control moderated the effect of social support on parental warmth: For mothers only, social support was significantly linked to parent-child warmth only when mothers had low (but not high) perceived self-control. The discussion focuses on reasons why perceived control and social support may have associations with different aspects of parenting and why these might differ for mothers and fathers.

  • 30.
    Tokic Milakovic, Ana
    et al.
    University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Glatz, Terese
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Pecnik, Ninoslava
    University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    How do parents facilitate or inhibit adolescent disclosure?: The role of adolescents' psycholoogical needs satisfaction2018In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, ISSN 0265-4075, E-ISSN 1460-3608, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1118-1138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to test whether the correlation between parental behaviors in the context of adolescent disclosure and adolescents’ self-reported disclosure could be explained by fulfillment of adolescents’ basic psychological needs within their relationships with mothers and fathers. The cross-sectional data were collected from a representative sample of 1,074 seventh graders in Croatia. Parental facilitating behaviors (initiating conversation, support and respectful guidance) and some of the inhibiting behaviors (unavailability, punishment) were shown to be indirectly associated with adolescents’ disclosure through the perceptions of their needs satisfaction. The assumption about the unique contribution of the need-for-relatedness satisfaction in mediating the link between parental behaviors and disclosure was consistently supported, whereas the specific contribution of the need-for-autonomy was apparent only in data about mothers, but not fathers. The results are equivalent for routine disclosure and self-disclosure, suggesting that the processes through which parents facilitate or inhibit both are rather comparable.

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