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  • 1.
    Bentley, Gill
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Collinge, Chris
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Gibney, John
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Murie, Alan
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Tilson, Barbara
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Opportunity West Midlands: Understanding Business Change in the Regional Economy1999Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brockett, Susan
    et al.
    Nordregio.
    Böhme, Kai
    Nordregio.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Wild cards and trends2004In: Spatial Development Trends: Nordic Countries in a European Context / [ed] Brockett, Susan, Dahlström, Margareta, Stockholm: Nordregio , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Brockett, Susan
    et al.
    Nordregio.
    Dahlström, MargaretaKarlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Spatial Development Trends: Nordic Countries in a European Context2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Caffyn, Alison
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Connecting Town and Country: Joint working of local authorities in urban and rural areas2001Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Caffyn, Alison
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Regional Innovation Strategy: Urban-Rural Interdependencies, Policy and Innovation – an explorative study of opportunities with the new Objective 2 programme2001Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Caffyn, Alison
    et al.
    University of Birmingham.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    University of Birmingham.
    Spencer, Ken
    University of Birmingham.
    Rogers, Steve
    University of Birmingham.
    Rural Proofing for Local Authorities2002In: Local Governance, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 273-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theconcept of rural proofing, identified by the Government in its Rural WhitePaper, involves identifying whether new or existing policies will havedifferential impacts in rural areas and considering adjustments orcompensations to address these. The article examines how local authorities canput rural proofing into practice at the local level. Based on researchundertaken for the Countryside Agency, it considers how local authority policyand decision making processes can lend themselves to rural proofing andmitigate differential impacts in rural areas. A localised rural proofingchecklist is drawn up and a range of issues associated with implementing such amechanism are debated. Conclusions are drawn as to how local authorities cantake rural proofing forward.

  • 7.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Analysing globalisation: a method2004In: Spatial Development Trends: Nordic Countries in a European Context / [ed] Brockett, Susan, Dahlström, Margareta, Stockholm: Nordregio , 2004, p. 41-53Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Change and Development in the Business Services Sector: an Emerging Regional Agenda2000In: Regional Development Agencies and Business Change / [ed] Bentley, Gill, Gibney, John, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Cross-sectoral knowledge dynamics – film tourism example2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Cultural Tourism: Definitions and Links2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Den ekonomiska geografin glömmer tjänsteproduktionen1990In: Nordisk Samhällsgeografisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0282-4329, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism. Nordregio.
    EURODITE – the project and key findings2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Film and regional development in Sweden: public support of feature film production2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Film and regional development in Sweden: public support of feature filmproduction2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Film och regional utveckling i Norden2005In: Film och regional utveckling i Norden / [ed] Dahlström, M., Bjarnadóttir, H., Hermelin, B., Jörgensen, J., Lähteenmäki-Smith, K., Rusten, G., Skúladóttir, M.G., Wengström, E., Stockholm: Svenska filminstitutet & Nordregio , 2005, p. 7-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Film tourism in Skåne: demand led development and knowledge dynamics2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the development of film tourism in Skåne, the southernmost region of Sweden. The point of departure is the research framework developed within the ongoing 6th Framework project EURODITE highlighting knowledge dynamics at regional and firm levels.

     

    On the conceptual level, the research framework includes two integrated knowledge dynamics; territorial knowledge dynamics and firm level knowledge dynamics. The territorial knowledge dynamics concern knowledge exchange, networks and interactions between different actors from a spatial perspective. Key actors may include firms, higher education institutions, chambers of commerce and regional authorities. The spatial focus stresses the importance of the regional level at the same time as it emphasises that interaction is not constrained to an administrative regional level. On the contrary, territorial knowledge dynamics are seen as multi-scalar that may include important interactions at great distances. Understanding the territorial knowledge dynamics demands probing issues such as the role of proximity and distance in terms of knowledge interactions, and the importance of mobility of different actors and individuals. Special attention is paid to how various types of policies affect the knowledge dynamics. These policies may stem from supranational, national, regional or local level, but it is the way that the policies are played out at the regional level that is in focus.

     

    The firm level knowledge dynamics concern how knowledge is developed and transferred at a micro level; within a firm or an organisation, or within a network of firms or organisations. The research framework uses a knowledge biography approach in investigating these knowledge dynamics starting from a change in product, process or organisation. The empirical research is carried out through case studies using narrative interviews. Key events of knowledge interaction are identified in an attempt to understand the processes and the role of different actors aiming at ‘telling the story’ of the change from idea to implementation. There are links between the firm level knowledge dynamics and the territorial knowledge dynamics, e.g. through interaction between different actors.

     

    The empirical study presented in the paper deals with the development of film tourism in Skåne. This type of tourism has expanded in the last decade, mainly triggered by the influx of tourists to the small town of Ystad, which is the base for Henning Mankell’s books about Inspector Wallander. The first book was published in 1991, and they have since been translated to over 35 languages and become international bestsellers. The books generated tourists, particularly from Germany, that visited Ystad to walk Wallander’s streets. In 2004, 13 Wallander films were shot in and around Ystad. The release of these films triggered an influx of film tourists that wanted to visit the studios, Wallander’s office in the police station, his flat and so on. These new demands triggered the local authorities to develop more than the Wallander maps that had been produced in response to the literature tourists. In the summer 2006 a project started Cineteket, an attraction focusing on films produced in Ystad and including guided tours of the studios.

     

    Due to the high profile of the Wallander films, that also include a BBC production with Kenneth Branagh in 2008 and a series of 13 new Wallander films 2008-2009, it is easy to interpret film production in Skåne as a recent phenomenon. However, this is not the case. The first Swedish feature films were, in fact, shot in a studio in another Skåne town, Kristianstad, some 80 kilometres north of Ystad. This studio is now a Film Museum with an additional permanent exhibition about Skåne in Swedish films in the regional museum in Kristianstad. A third film related heritage in the region is the Hasse & Tage Museum in Tomelilla, a small town 15 kilometres north of Ystad. The duo Hasse Alfredsson and Tage Danielsson were very versatile artists that produced shows, radio and films during the 1960s-1980s. Many of these films were shot in and around Tomelilla. The Hasse & Tage Museum opened in 2006. It is a unique museum of only 15m2 that only fits eight visitors at a time. The three film attractions, Cineteket in Ystad, the Film Museum in Kristianstad and the Hasse & Tage Museum in Tomelilla have now started collaborating within the concept of ‘the Film Track’.

     

    The paper discusses and analyses the growing film tourism and the development of the Film Track, using the conceptual framework of territorial and firm level knowledge dynamics.

  • 17.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Filmturism: möten mellan kultur och näring i globaliseringens tid2008In: Globalisering och kultur / [ed] Kolmodin, Anne, Östersund: Institutet för Tillväxtpolitiska studier , 2008, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Från ung till vuxen: Utbildning, arbete, fritid och framtid för ungdomar i Troms1994Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Gränsöverskridande samarbete1994In: Barents perspektiv, ISSN 0804-6174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Is there a Nordic perspective on regional policy?2004In: Regions Magazine, ISSN 1367-3882, no 254, p. 27-30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Knowledge anchoring in game development and film tourism2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Knowledge dynamics and green growth: Climate change adaptation needs as innovation drivers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge dynamics and green growth – climate change adaptation needs as innovation drivers in the Lake Vänern region 

    How can Europe deliver a smart, sustainable and inclusive growth? The tall order of green growth forms the EU’s overarching strategy for economic development, Europe 2020, for the 21st Century. (EC, 2010) But what is green growth? How can it be achieved? How can the dual great global challenges of climate change and economic development (OECD, 2011) be addressed at the same time? Taking on this challenge calls for innovative, multi- and transdisciplinary approaches to research, and development of new concepts and methods are needed. The research should involve different actors to safe guard relevance for policy and practice in addition to development of new knowledge. (Carillo-Hermosilla et al. 2009, 2010) This paper reports from a budding project that builds on existing research and expertise within the research team in two broad fields; climate change adaptation and knowledge dynamics and innovation. By further development and interconnection of these fields, new knowledge of relevance to the worlds of science, policy and practice will be produced.

    The research puts the interconnections between climate change adaptation and green growth at the core of the project. This is done through three linked work packages: 1) climate change adaptation and scenarios that identify needs for such adaptations, 2) green growth, particularly in relation to knowledge dynamics and (eco)-innovation processes, and 3) multi- and transdisciplinary research methods, which are the fundamental approach for the entire project. The overall research question is: How can climate change adaptation needs act as innovation drivers and contribute to green growth?

    The research follows a multi- and transdisciplinary approach, combining different methodologies of scenario development and living lab processes. The LakeVänern region is the empirical focus and serves as living lab environment. The focus for the scenarios will be climate change effects on water. The scenarios will produce qualitative and quantitative information on possible climate change effects on water-related issues e.g. floods, fishing or tourism. Scenario techniques are used to integrate narrative information (storylines) provided by a wide range of stakeholders in the region. The scenarios provide input about how climate change adaptation and green growth in living lab-inspired processes interact, exploring (eco)-innovation opportunities across a wide range of actors in the region. Against this background potential innovation for green growth for the LakeVänern region will be identified.

    One aim with the project is to develop living-lab-inspired methods on knowledge dynamics in relation to issues of green growth, (eco-) innovation and sustainable development in the Lake Vänern region. A living lab is a user-centred research concept - often operating within a territorial context (e.g. city, agglomeration or region), systematically integrating both research and innovation processes simultaneously. (Eriksson et al., 2005, Schumacher & Feurstein, 2006, Marsh, 2008) Budweg et al., 2011).The living lab approach is being used world-wide, for example in a European network of living labs (www.openlivinglabs.eu) and by the Swedish Government Agency for Innovation Systems (www.vinnova.se).

    The paper explores knowledge dynamics and green growth with an empirical focus on the Lake Vänern Region in western Sweden. Lake Vänern is the largest lake within the EU and with its surrounding area provides a multifaceted region where many of the green economy challenges and opportunities are present. The lake has a unique fauna and flora and is the fresh water source for the 300 000 inhabitants in the region. It is also Sweden’s largest hydroelectric power dam and is used for transportation, commercial fishing and recreational purposes for the local population as well as for the tourism industry. With regards to local planning, the lake provides an attractive setting for waterside developments. Lake Vänern administratively affects thirteen local, two regional and two national authorities, in addition to regulations at EU levels that are affecting the lake and its surroundings. Through the many competing demands on the resource of Lake Vänern, the region provides a valuable case to study knowledge dynamics in a green economy.

  • 23.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Knowledge dynamics and networks for ‘greening the economy’: the case of Paper Province 2.02014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Knowledge dynamics and the 'green economy': developing an innovation system for a bio based economy2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores knowledge dynamics processes applied on an initiative aiming to develop an innovation system for a bio based economy.

    Demands for conversions into ecological sustainable production calls for the development of new knowledge. Knowledge from diverse disciplines have to come together to develop new knowledge needed for solving problems to advance a green economy. Radical, rather than incremental innovations of products, services and processes are required. The development of new knowledge takes place in complex relationships between different types of actors located in diverse places. Actors include SMEs, transnational firms, universities, research institutions and public agencies. Knowledge interactions across sectors, scales and actors can be called knowledge dynamics.

    This paper deals with the initiative ‘Paper province 2.0 – an innovation system for a bio based economy’. It builds on extensive triple helix networks centred in the cluster organisation ‘The Paper Province’ incorporating pulp- and paper technology firms, KIBS and other actors in Värmland and neighbouring areas in Sweden. The networks of the cluster are as complex as the relations described above.

    The initiative has won support from Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems to work up an application to the Vinnväxt programme. Successful initiatives win funding for 10 years to through radical initiatives develop strong, internationally competitive innovation systems within strategic areas of importance for sustainable regional development.

    In what ways are knowledge interactions across sectors, scales and actors present and have capacity to contribute to the green economy through developing an innovation system for a bio based economy?

  • 25.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Knowledge dynamics in a green economy2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge dynamics in a green economy

    This paper aims to develop the understanding of knowledge dynamics processes developed in the European research project ‘Regional trajectories to the knowledge economy’ (EURODITE) applied on knowledge dynamics processes in a green economy.

    Demands for conversions into ecological sustainable production of goods and services calls for the generation and processing of new knowledge. To address the challenges of an ecological sustainable production, the furthering of knowledge within single scientific disciplines is not sufficient for driving innovations to tackle these challenges. On the contrary, different types of knowledge such as analytic, synthetic and symbolic, as well as knowledge from diverse disciplines have to come together to develop new knowledge needed for solving problems to advance a green economy. Hence, the generation and development of new knowledge takes place in complex relationships between different types of actors located in different places. Actors involved in knowledge generation and development range from micro businesses to transnational firms, higher education and research institutions and public actors and agencies of different kinds. Increasingly, also users and consumers are identified as playing important roles with regards to knowledge dynamics. Knowledge interactions across sectors, scales and actors can be called knowledge dynamics. An important aspect of knowledge dynamics is that changes in knowledge are driving innovation. In addition, policy actors can play a role in taking action to promote and support knowledge dynamic processes and remove obstacles obstructing such processes.

    The paper explores knowledge dynamics in a green economy with an empirical focus on Lake Vänern in western Sweden. Lake Vänern is the largest lake within the EU and with its surrounding area provides a multifaceted region where many of the green economy challenges and opportunities are present. The lake has a unique fauna and flora and is the fresh water source for the 300 000 inhabitants in the region. It is also Sweden’s largest hydroelectric power dam and is used for transportation, commercial fishing and recreational purposes for the local population as well as for the tourism industry. With regards to local planning, the lake provides an attractive setting for waterside developments. Lake Vänern administratively affects thirteen local and two regional authorities, in addition to regulations at national and EU levels that are affecting the lake and its surroundings. Through the many competing demands on the resource of Lake Vänern, the region provides a valuable case to study knowledge dynamics in a green economy.

  • 26.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Knowledge dynamics in the Skåne film tourismindustry2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Geography, Media and Communication.
    Knowledge dynamics, networks and policy interactions: the case of Paper Province 2.02014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Multi-actor and multi-scalar regional development policies in theknowledge economy2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is increasingly difficult for firms and other actors to access all necessary knowledge for innovation within their ‘home’ region. This is the case for all types of firms and regions. Large firms with their own research and development units as well as small firms need to access extra-regional knowledge to continue to innovate. Regardless of in which type of a region that a firm is located, firms are depending on knowledge interactions crossing the regional boundaries. This relates just as well to regions with large populations and strong economies as to less populated regions. Public policies can play a role with regards to the ability for firms to be able to link into global knowledge flows. However, regional development agencies have to act in a challenging and changing context to support and promote economic development in the knowledge economy.

     

    The paper is based on two linked international research projects[1] dealing with knowledge generation, use and circulation in European regions. Seven main sectors are included: tourism; food and drink; biotechnology; new media; automotive; ICT and knowledge intensive business services (KIBS). Empirical case studies in 29 regions have been carried out, and include investigations into how policy actors and public funds at local, regional, national and European levels are utilised for supporting knowledge interactions.

     

    The mainly qualitative empirical research and the theoretical discussions in these projects have unravelled the complexity of knowledge interactions between different types of actors. The case studies have revealed very complex patterns of knowledge interactions between different types of actors (firms, organisations, higher education institutions and policy actors) both within the ‘home’ regions of firms and across regional and national borders. It is also clear that the policy options and policy funding alternatives are manifold and complex that include local, regional, national and international funding and programmes.

     

    The research has shown that RDAs and other policy actors target knowledge generation and transfers in a variety of ways. Partnerships, networks and governance structures are some key words in descriptions of policies in this regard. Since knowledge interactions involve many actors locally, regionally, nationally and internationally the context for these policies is increasingly complex and difficult to master. The multi-actor and multi-scalar characters of the knowledge economy in which the RDAs act are the focus of this paper.

    [1] The two projects are the 6th framework project ’Regional Trajectories to the Knowledge Economy [EURODITE]’ (2005-2010) and its sister project ‘Regional Trajectories to the Knowledge Economy – Nordic-European Comparisons [REKENE]’ part-funded by Nordic Innovation Center (2007-2010)

  • 29.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Private Sector Services: Current Trends in the West Midlands Region1999Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    REKENE in a nutshell2010In: Journal of Nordregio, ISSN 1650-5891, no 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Service Industries, Restructuring and the New Regionalism: The Case of the West Midlands2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Service Production: Uneven Development and Local Solutions in Swedish Child Care1993Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Small firms and regional specialisation: Nordic experiences1995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    The Business Services Sector in the West Midlands Region: Growth and Constraints1998Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    The Production of Child Care Services in Sweden: Uneven Development and Local Solutions1995Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    The production of child care services in Sweden- uneven development and local solutions1997In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507, ISSN 0264-2069, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 28-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the production and regional development of child care services in Sweden. The production of social services outside the home is discussed in relation to labour market needs and equal opportunities. Staffing, organisation and extension of child care services, as well as restructuring trends are dealt with. The services studied are characterised by local solutions. Reasons for local variations are discussed with special references to labour market factors, political tradition and level of urbanisation. No single factor can explain the variations. Explanations have to be found in the specific local mix of factors.

  • 37.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    The Role of the Service Sector in the Restructuring of Old Industrial Regions: The Case of the West Midlands1999In: Regional Prosperity and Sustainability, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Tjänsteproduktion, den lokala resursbasen och regional utveckling: exemplet barnomsorg1992In: Internationalisering af service og regional udvikling i Norden, København: NordREFO, 1992:5, 1992Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Tjänsteproduktionen anatomi och geografi1995In: Samhällets geografi / [ed] Berger, Sune, Uppsala: Nordisk Samhällsgeografisk Tidskrift , 1995, 2, p. 95-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Urban-rural interdependencies: exploring ‘Hidden’ Employment in the Urban-Rural Fringe2000Report (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Nordregio.
    Urban-rural interdependencies: Partnerships, planning and policies2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms urban and rural are commonly used in an oppositional or compartmentalised fashion. Policies promoting regional development have similarly been developed by urban or rural authorities and agencies with little cross referencing. This paper argues that compartmentalisation is not always the best mechanism and that there are benefits to be gained by taking an integrated urban-rural approach focusing on commonalities, complementarities  and links rather than differences. Literature and policy documents at the European Union, national and regional levels are increasingly stressing interdependencies placing a new emphasis on functional regions and sub-regions rather than dichotomised town and country.

     

    This paper presents the results of research into joint working between urban and rural local authorities in Britain. Local authorities, together with other public and private partners, have increasingly engaged in cross-boundary collaboration to address issues relating to sustainable regional development in the widest sense. The paper reports primary research in the United Kingdom into the scale and scope of such collaboration. In terms of scale, it is clear that joint working between urban and rural partners is increasingly common. This way of working has been promoted and supported by national agencies such as the Local Government Association and the Countryside Agency. With regards to scale, there is a very wide range of projects where urban-rural collaboration is used to address issues ranging from transport planning, sustainability and environment issues, via economic development, tourism and job creation to social exclusion, health and youth issues. Projects also range in size from just a few partners to over 30; from very small budgets to budgets well over £35 million; and from short term projects to long term initiatives of up to seven years plans and earmarked funding.

     

    Alongside a literature review, the research is based on a national postal questionnaire survey and telephone interviews with key informants in selected case studies. It reports the experiences of partners and benefits and challenges of urban-rural joint working. The paper also discusses urban-rural joint working in the light of the European spatial policy agenda, particularly in relation to the European Spatial Development Perspective (ESDP), the European Spatial Observatory Network (ESPON) and the Study Programme on European Spatial Planning (SPESP) and European funding programmes such as Interreg. Does the European agenda, and funding opportunities, inspire and facilitate joint working at regional and sub-regional levels? Or, is urban-rural joint working the result of a pragmatic ‘bottom-up’ approach to address issues that demand collaboration at a different geographical scale than that of individual local authorities? What scope is there for exchange of best practice between different regions and across national boundaries regarding this way of working?

     

    The paper concludes that the urban-rural interdependency perspective can be developed as a useful tool to increase our understanding of sustainable regional development. It can provide a framework to aide spatial planning in the widest sense at the regional and sub-regional levels. At a more theoretical level, the urban-rural interdependency perspective has the potential to contribute to the development of a social economy approach to regional development.

     

  • 42.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    University of Birminghma, UK.
    Urban-rural interdependency: explorative research, policy and practice2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Young women in a male periphery: experiences from the Scandinavian north1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Young women in a male periphery: experiences from the Scandinavian north1996In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 259-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the migration of young women from rural areas in northern Scandinavia. The way from adolescence to adulthood is discussed and the notionof a male periphery is presented. An attempt is made to shift focus in studies ofrural youth migration. The emphasis here is on the socially constructed space thatthe young women leave. Is one reason behind the rural migration pattern to be foundin the male periphery? The periphery is dominated by male economic and leisureactivities. Women in the rural areas are less visible, and their activities arenot as valued as the male activities. Young men tend to follow in the footstepof their fathers, while young rural women break with the mothers on their lifepaths. There are few modern role models for the daughters in the periphery. Astudy of young women and men in Troms county in northern Norway is used toillustrate the women's paths from adolescence to adult life. Young women inrural Troms do, to a much larger extent than the young rural men, take highereducation. They have ambitions of highly qualified jobs, either in towns or intheir home localities. The young rural women break new ground by continuing inhigher education. The young men run the risk of being left behind as losers.

  • 45.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Aldea-Partanen, Andrea
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Fellman, Katarina
    Ålands Statistik och Utredningsbyrå.
    Hedin, Sigrid
    Nordregio.
    Javakhishvili Larsen, Nino
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Bornholm, Denmark.
    Jóhannesson, Hjalti
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Manniche, Jesper
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Denmark.
    Mattland Olsen, Grete
    , Møre Recearch/Volda University College, Norway.
    Peterson, Tage
    Centre for Regional and Tourism Research, Bornholm, Denmark.
    How to Make a Living in Insular Areas: Six Nordic Cases2006Report (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Nordregio.
    Bjarnadottír, HólmfrídurNordregio.Hermelin, BritaStockholm University.Jørgensen, JohnNordregio.Lähteenmäki-Smith, KaisaNordregio.Rusten, GreteUniversity of Bergen, Norway.Skúladóttir, Marta G.Ministry of Education, Reykjavik, Iceland.Wengström, ElisabethSvenska Filminstitutet.
    Film och regional utveckling i Norden2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Nordregio.
    Bjarnadóttir, Hólmfrídur
    Nordregio.
    Hermelin, Brita
    Stockholm University.
    Jørgensen, John
    Nordregio.
    Lähteenmäki-Smith, Kaisa
    Nordregio.
    Rusten, Grete
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Skúladóttir, Marta G.
    Ministry of Education, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Wengström, Elisabeth
    Svenska Filminstitutet.
    Kopplingar mellan filmproduktion och regional utveckling i Norden: skillnader och likheter2005In: Film och regional utveckling i Norden / [ed] Dahlström, M., Bjarnadóttir, H., Hermelin, B., Jörgensen, J., Lähteenmäki-Smith, K., Rusten, G., Skúladóttir, M.G., Wengström, E., Stockholm: Nordregio och Svenska filminstitutet , 2005, p. 195-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Braunerhielm, Lotta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Developing the experience economy in non-metropolitan regions: cross-clusternetworks in Värmland2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common challenge for many companies in the experience economy is that firms are small, struggle with low profits and, particularly in non-metropolitan regions, often are scattered over a large area. These challenges make it different for the firms to find time for accessing new markets and to innovate and engage in product development. An important aspect of product development is the interaction between producer and consumer that drives innovation through new trends expressed through consumer demands. One way of supporting firms in the experience economy is through different types of collaborative bodies such as destination management organisations or cluster organisations. These organisations typically include different actors such as public agencies, local authorities and chambers of commerce in addition to the companies. Public agencies working with local and regional development issues tend to be actively involved in the setting up and managing these organisations both because they can play the role as broker and ‘neutral’ party in relation to many different competing interests and also because of the importance of a strong experience economy with regards to regional growth.

    This paper presents a new project that focuses on cross-cluster networking in the Värmland region in Sweden. This non-metropolitan region has a number of strong and established clusters in several export industries supported by cluster organisations such as the IT cluster ‘Compare’, the cluster of pulp and paper technology ‘Paper Province’ and ‘Steel & Engineering’. In February 2011 a cluster organisation for the experience economy ‘Visit Värmland’ was established based on earlier collaboration. The project aims at studying and supporting cross-cluster networks between Visit Värmland and other clusters. Two important aspects of the study is firstly to focus on opportunities for firms in the experience economy with regards to product development and accessing new markets through collaborations with the established clusters and secondly to explore knowledge development and learning for both the new and the established clusters through cross-cluster networking. The project involves actors from the clusters and is thereby partly co-produced research.

    The first aspect of the study is based on the practice of the export firms in the established clusters to involve different types of Värmland experiences in their customer relations. A large number of small and large events are organised every year involving a variety of firms within the experience economy. The scale and scope of these activities are not known. In a first phase of the project a mapping exercise is taking place with regards to these activities and the scope for a development of the experience economy through a more organised cross-cluster networking between ‘Visit Värmland’ and the established clusters. Can firms in the experience economy tap into this market and through customer-producer interactions with overseas visitors access opportunities to innovate and engage in product development? The second aspect of the study is planned to involve deeper research into the knowledge dynamics of cross-cluster networks e.g. in terms of organisational learning. In what ways can the new cluster ‘Visit Värmland’ learn from interactions with the established clusters and their ways of working with regards to activities such as business development, innovation, marketing and competence development? In what ways can established clusters learn from a new cluster organisation for example through being exposed to different ways of working and thereby perhaps avoiding getting locked in in established work practices? Cross-cluster networks may provide opportunities for innovative thinking also in terms of organisation development since this type of interaction challenges what is taken for granted in organisational practices. In a third phase of the project we aim to expand the study to comparative research involving cross-cluster working with the experience economy in other regions and countries.

  • 49.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Geography and Tourism.
    Eskelinen, HeikiUniversity of Joensuu, Finland.Wiberg, UlfUniversity of Umeå, Sweden.Haapanen, Elisa
    The East-West Interface in the European North1995Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Dahlström, Margareta
    et al.
    Nordregio.
    Hansen, Malin
    Nordregio.
    Östberg, Sara
    Nordregio.
    Kahila, Petri
    Nordregio.
    Storstadsnära landsbygd i regional utvecklingsplanering2008Report (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 82
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