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  • 1. Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    et al.
    Sirel, Madle
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    Chan, Sherwin Chun Leung
    Moll, Kirsten
    Tellgren-Roth, Asa
    Nilsson, IngMarie
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Epitopes of anti-RIFIN antibodies and characterization of rif-expressing Plasmodium falciparum parasites by RNA sequencing2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 43190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variable surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum have been a major research focus since they facilitate parasite sequestration and give rise to deadly malaria complications. Coupled with its potential use as a vaccine candidate, the recent suggestion that the repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) mediate blood group A rosetting and influence blood group distribution has raised the research profile of these adhesins. Nevertheless, detailed investigations into the functions of this highly diverse multigene family remain hampered by the limited number of validated reagents. In this study, we assess the specificities of three promising polyclonal anti-RIFIN antibodies that were IgG-purified from sera of immunized animals. Their epitope regions were mapped using a 175,000-peptide microarray holding overlapping peptides of the P. falciparum variable surface antigens. Through immunoblotting and immunofluorescence imaging, we show that different antibodies give varying results in different applications/assays. Finally, we authenticate the antibody-based detection of RIFINs in two previously uncharacterized non-rosetting parasite lines by identifying the dominant rif transcripts using RNA sequencing.

  • 2.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Bradley, Frideborg
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Guthrie, Brandon L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Global Hlth, Washington, DC USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol Hlth, Washington, DC USA..
    Birse, Kenzie
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Noel-Romas, Laura
    Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, SciLifeLab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bosire, Rose
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kiarie, James
    Univ Nairobi, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Farquhar, Carey
    Univ Washington, Dept Med Global Hlth & Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Burgener, Adam D.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Manitoba, Dept Med Microbiol, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.;Publ Hlth Agcy Canada, JC Wilt Infect Dis Ctr, Natl HIV & Retrovirol Labs, Winnipeg, MB, Canada..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Broliden, Kristina
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna,Unit Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A High-throughput Bead-based Affinity Assay Enables Analysis of Genital Protein Signatures in Women At Risk of HIV Infection2019In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 461-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women at high risk of HIV infection, including sex workers and those with active genital inflammation, have molecular signatures of immune activation and epithelial barrier remodeling in samples of their genital mucosa. These alterations in the local immunological milieu are likely to impact HIV susceptibility. We here analyze host genital protein signatures in HIV uninfected women, with high frequency of condom use, living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. Cervicovaginal secretions from women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships (n = 62) were collected at three time points over 12 months. Women living in HIV-negative seroconcordant relationships (controls, n = 25) were sampled at one time point. All study subjects were examined for demographic parameters associated with susceptibility to HIV infection. The cervicovaginal samples were analyzed using a high-throughput bead-based affinity assay. Proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation were increased in HIV-serodiscordant women. By combining several methods of analysis, a total of five proteins (CAPG, KLK10, SPRR3, elafin/PI3, CSTB) were consistently associated with this study group. Proteins analyzed using the affinity set-up were further validated by label-free tandem mass spectrometry in a partially overlapping cohort with concordant results. Women living in HIV-serodiscordant relationships thus had elevated levels of proteins involved in epithelial barrier function and inflammation despite low prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and a high frequency of safe sex practices. The identified proteins are important markers to follow during assessment of mucosal HIV susceptibility factors and a high-throughput bead-based affinity set-up could be a suitable method for such evaluation.

  • 3.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Moll, Kirsten
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Idris, Zulkarnain Md
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Kebangsaan, Malaysia Med Ctr, Fac Med, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Saiwaew, Somporn
    Mahidol Univ, Fac Trop Med, Dept Clin Trop Med, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Antibodies in children with malaria to PfEMP1, RIFIN and SURFIN expressed at the Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell surface2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naturally acquired antibodies to proteins expressed on the Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell (pRBC) surface steer the course of a malaria infection by reducing sequestration and stimulating phagocytosis of pRBC. Here we have studied a selection of proteins representing three different parasite gene families employing a well-characterized parasite with a severe malaria phenotype (FCR3S1.2). The presence of naturally acquired antibodies, impact on rosetting rate, surface reactivity and opsonization for phagocytosis in relation to different blood groups of the ABO system were assessed in a set of sera from children with mild or complicated malaria from an endemic area. We show that the naturally acquired immune responses, developed during malaria natural infection, have limited access to the pRBCs inside a blood group A rosette. The data also indicate that SURFIN4.2 may have a function at the pRBC surface, particularly during rosette formation, this role however needs to be further validated. Our results also indicate epitopes differentially recognized by rosette-disrupting antibodies on a peptide array. Antibodies towards parasite-derived proteins such as PfEMP1, RIFIN and SURFIN in combination with host factors, essentially the ABO blood group of a malaria patient, are suggested to determine the outcome of a malaria infection.

  • 4.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Natl Univ Singapore, Dept Microbiol & Immunol, Singapore, Singapore..
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Imam, Maryam
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hultenby, Kjell
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Res Ctr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Theisen, Michael
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Congenital Disorders, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Int Hlth Immunol & Microbiol, Ctr Med Parasitol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Moll, Kirsten
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Chan, Sherwin
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Biomedicum, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol MTC, Stockholm, Sweden..
    SURGE complex of Plasmodium falciparum in the rhoptry-neck (SURFIN4.2-RON4-GLURP) contributes to merozoite invasion2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 8, article id e0201669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium falciparum invasion into red blood cells (RBCs) is a complex process engaging proteins on the merozoite surface and those contained and sequentially released from the apical organelles (micronemes and rhoptries). Fundamental to invasion is the formation of a moving junction (MJ), a region of close apposition of the merozoite and the RBC plasma membranes, through which the merozoite draws itself before settling into a newly formed parasitophorous vacuole (PV). SURFIN4.2 was identified at the surface of the parasitized RBCs (pRBCs) but was also found apically associated with the merozoite. Using antibodies against the N-terminus of the protein we show the presence of SURFIN4.2 in the neck of the rhoptries, its secretion into the PV and shedding into the culture supernatant upon schizont rupture. Using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry we describe here a novel protein complex we have named SURGE where SURFIN4.2 forms interacts with the rhoptry neck protein 4 (RON4) and the Glutamate Rich Protein (GLURP). The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of SURFIN4.2 mediates binding to the RBC membrane and its interaction with RON4 suggests its involvement in the contact between the merozoite apex and the RBC at the MJ. Supporting this suggestion, we also found that polyclonal antibodies to the extracellular domain (including the CRD) of SURFIN4.2 partially inhibit merozoite invasion. We propose that the formation of the SURGE complex participates in the establishment of parasite infection within the PV and the RBCs.

  • 5. ten Berge, Josianne C.
    et al.
    van Rosmalen, Joost
    Vermeer, Jacolien
    Hellström, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rothova, Aniki
    Schreurs, Marco W. J.
    Serum Autoantibody Profiling of Patients with Paraneoplastic and Non-Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Retinopathy2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, article id e0167909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Although multiple serum antiretinal autoantibodies (ARAs) have been reported in patients with paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic autoimmune retinopathy ((n)pAIR), not all retinal antigens involved in (n)pAIR are specified. This study aims to serologically identify patients with presumed (n)pAIR through determination of both known and unknown ARAs by autoantibody profiling. Methods An antigen suspension bead array using 188 different antigens representing 97 ocular proteins was performed to detect ARAs in serum samples of patients with presumed (n)pAIR (n = 24), uveitis (n = 151) and cataract (n = 21). Logistic regressions were used to estimate the associations between ocular antigens and diagnosis. Validation of interphotoreceptor matrix proteoglycan 2 (IMPG2) and recoverin antigens was performed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot, respectively. Results Samples of patients with presumed (n)pAIR exhibited a broad spectrum of ARAs. We identified retinal antigens that have already been described previously (e.g. recoverin), but also identified novel ARA targets. Most ARAs were not specific for (n)pAIR since their presence was also observed in patients with cataract or uveitis. High titers of autoantibodies directed against photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor and retinol-binding protein 3 were more common in patients with presumed (n)pAIR compared to uveitis (p = 0.015 and p = 0.018, respectively). The presence of all other ARAs did not significantly differ between groups. In patients with presumed (n)pAIR, anti-recoverin autoantibodies were the most prevalent ARAs. Validation of bead array results by immunohistochemistry (anti-IMPG2) and immunoblot (anti-recoverin) showed concordant results in (n)pAIR patients. Conclusions Patients with (n)pAIR are characterized by the presence of a broad spectrum of ARAs. The diagnosis of (n)pAIR cannot be based on the mere presence of serum ARAs, as these are also commonly present in uveitis as well as in age-related cataract patients.

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