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  • 1.
    Bodin, Maja
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nationella interventioner för att förebygga alkoholrelaterade skador bland barn och unga: en sammanställning av myndigheternas arbete och resultat2011Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bodin, Maja
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Prevention av alkoholrelaterade skador bland unga: en forskningsöversikt2011Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    The effect of stricter licensing on road traffic injury events involving 15 to 17-year-old moped drivers in Sweden: a time series intervention study2015In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 83, p. 154-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to evaluate and quantify the effect of the introduction of the AM driving license on non-fatal moped-related injuries in Sweden. With the introduction of the new license category in October 2009, prospective moped drivers are now required to pass a mandatory theory test following a practical and theoretical course. In addition, obtaining a license to operate a moped is now considerably more costly.

    METHODS:Time series intervention analysis on monthly aggregated injury data (1st Jan 2007-31st Dec 2013) was performed using generalized additive models for location, shape and scale (GAMLSS) to quantify the effect size on injury events involving teenage (15-17 years) moped drivers, while controlling for trend and seasonality. Exposure was adjusted for by using the number of registered mopeds in traffic as a proxy.

    RESULTS:The introduction of AM license was associated with a 41% reduction in the rate of injury events involving 15-year-old moped drivers (IRR 0.59 [95% CI: 0.48-0.72]), and a 39% and 36% decrease in those involving 16-year-old (IRR 0.61 [95% CI: 0.48-0.79]) and 17-year-old drivers (IRR 0.64 [95% CI: 0.46-0.90]), respectively. The effect in the 15-year-old stratum was decreased roughly by half after adjusting for exposure, but remained significant, and the corresponding estimates in the other age groups did not change noticeably.

    CONCLUSIONS:This study provides quasi-experimental evidence of an effect on non-fatal moped-related injuries as a result of stricter licensing rules. Only part of the effect could be explained by a reduction in the number of mopeds in traffic, indicating that other mechanisms must be studied to fully understand the cause of the reduction in injuries.

  • 4.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Can the provision of a home help service for the elderly population reduce the incidence of fall-related injuries?2016In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 22, no Suppl.2, p. A181-A181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Fall-related injuries are a global public health problem, especially in elderly populations. In this study, the effect of an intervention aimed at reducing the risk of falls in the homes of community-dwelling elderly persons was evaluated. The intervention, which involves home hazards reduction by providing a minor home help service, is provided in the majority of Swedish municipalities.

    Methods Intention-to-treat effect estimates were derived using quasi-experimental time series intervention (ITS) analysis for immediate effects and a difference-in-discontinuity (RD) design for long term effects, and community-level estimates were pooled using meta-analysis. The outcome measure was the incidence of fall-related hospitalizations in the treatment population, the age of which varied by municipality (≥65 years, ≥67 years, ≥70 years or ≥75 years).

    Results We found no statistically significant reductions in injury incidence in the ITS (IRR 1.01 [95% CI: 0.98–1.05]) or RD (IRR 1.00 [95% CI: 0.97–1.03]) analyses. The results are robust to several different model specifications, including segmented panel regression analysis with linear trend change and community fixed effects parameters.

    Conclusions It is unclear whether absence of an effect is due to a low efficacy of the home hazards modifications provided, or a result of low utilisation. Additional studies of the effects on other quality of life measures are recommended before conclusions are drawn regarding the cost-effectiveness of the provision of home help services

  • 5.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Can the provision of a minor home help service for the elderly population reduce the incidence of fall-related injuries?: A quasi-experimental study of the community-level effects on hospital admissions in Swedish municipalities2016In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 412-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fall-related injuries are a global public health problem, especially in elderly populations. The effect of an intervention aimed at reducing the risk of falls in the homes of community-dwelling elderly persons was evaluated. The intervention mainly involves the performance of complicated tasks and hazards assessment by a trained assessor, and has been adopted gradually over the last decade by 191 of 290 Swedish municipalities.   

    Methods

    A quasi-experimental design was used where intention-to-treat effect estimates were derived using panel regression analysis and a regression-discontinuity (RD) design. The outcome measure was the incidence of fall-related hospitalizations in the treatment population, the age of which varied by municipality (≥65 years, ≥67 years, ≥70 years or ≥75 years).

    Results

    We found no statistically significant reductions in injury incidence in the panel regression (IRR 1.01 [95% CI: 0.98-1.05]) or RD (IRR 1.00 [95% CI: 0.97-1.03]) analyses. The results are robust to several different model specifications, including segmented panel regression analysis with linear trend change and community fixed effects parameters.

    Conclusions

    It is unclear whether the absence of an effect is due to a low efficacy of the services provided, or a result of low adherence. Additional studies of the effects on other quality of life measures are recommended before conclusions are drawn regarding the cost-effectiveness of the provision of home help service programs.

  • 6.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Jakobsson, Niklas
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Karlstad Business School (from 2013). Norwegian Social Research (NOVA), Oslo, Norway.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Are fire safe cigarettes actually fire safe?: Evidence from changes in US state laws2018In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effects of fire safe cigarette laws on fire mortality and cigarette-related fires in the USA.

    METHODS: We examined the gradual implementation of the laws to identify their average effects, using difference-in-differences analysis to account for common year effects, time-invariant state effects, state-specific trends and observable time-varying state-level covariates.

    RESULTS: We found no statistically significant effects on all-cause fire mortality, residential fire mortality or cigarette-caused fire rates. The estimates for cigarette-caused fire deaths were significant under some specifications, but were not robust to the inclusion of state-specific trends or comparisons to effects on other cause-determined fires.

    CONCLUSIONS: Given the mixed state of our results, we conclude that previous claims regarding the effects of fire safe cigarette laws may be premature.

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  • 7.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Jonsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Investigating the effect of banning non-reduced ignition propensity cigarettes on fatal residential fires in Sweden 2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 334-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:Annually, 100 people die as a result of residential fires in Sweden and almost a third of the fatal fires are known to be caused by smoking. In an attempt to reduce the occurrence of these events, reduced ignition propensity (RIP) cigarettes have been developed. They are designed to reduce the risk of fire by preventing the cigarette from burning through the full length when left unattended. In November 2011, a ban was introduced, forbidding the production and sale of all non-RIP cigarettes in all member states of the European Union, including Sweden.

    METHODS:Monthly data on all recorded residential fires and associated fatalities in Sweden from January 2000 to December 2013 were analyzed using an interrupted time series design. The effect of the intervention [in relative risk (RR)] was quantified using generalised additive models for location, shape and scale.

    RESULTS:There were no statistically significant intervention effects on residential fires (RR 0.95 [95% CI: 0.89-1.01]), fatal residential fires (RR 0.99 [95% CI: 0.80-1.23]), residential fires where smoking was a known cause (RR 1.10 [95% CI: 0.95-1.28]) or fatal residential fires where smoking was a known cause (RR 0.92 [95% CI: 0.63-1.35]).

    CONCLUSION:No evidence of an effect of the ban on all non-RIP cigarettes on the risk of residential fires in Sweden was found. The results may not be generalisable to other countries.

  • 8.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Sociodemografiska skillnader i risken för bostadsbrand, prevalens av brandskydd i hemmet och hantering av bränder: En analys av nationella enkäter 2001, 2005 och 20082017Report (Other academic)
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  • 9.
    Bonander, Carl
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    The effect of the Swedish bicycle helmet law for children: An interrupted time series study2014In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 51, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous population-based research has shown that bicycle helmet laws can reduce head injury rates among cyclists. According to deterrence theory, such laws are mainly effective if there is a high likelihood of being apprehended. In this study, we investigated the effect of the Swedish helmet law for children under the age of 15, a population that cannot be fined. Method  An interrupted time series design was used. Monthly inpatient data on injured cyclists from 1998–2012, stratified by age (0–14, 15 +), sex, and injury diagnosis, was obtained from the National Patient Register. The main outcome measure was the proportion of head injury admissions per month. Intervention effect estimates were obtained using generalized autoregressive moving average (GARMA) models. Pre-legislation trend and seasonality was adjusted for, and differences-in-differences estimation was obtained using adults as a non-equivalent control group. Results There was a statistically significant intervention effect among male children, where the proportion of head injuries dropped by 7.8 percentage points. There was no evidence of an intervention effect on the proportion of head injuries among female children. Conclusion According to hospital admission data, the bicycle helmet law appears to have had an effect only on male children.

  • 10.
    Carlström, Eric
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden; University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Sweden.
    Palm, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Khorram-Manesh, Amir
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holmer, Björn
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berner, Andreas
    Region Västra Götaland.
    Örninge, Per
    Region Västra Götaland.
    Luning, Hampus
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Sweden.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gelang, Carita
    Region Västra Götaland.
    Thorsson, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Erratum: Medical Emergencies During a Half Marathon Race - The Influence of Weather2019In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 312-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Carlström, Eric
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg; Campus Vestfold, Borre.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Ostra, Gothenburg.
    Palm, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Khorram-Manesh, Amir
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Holmer, Björn
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Berner, Andreas
    Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg.
    Örninge, Per
    Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg.
    Luning, Hampus
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Gelang, Carita
    Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg.
    Thorsson, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Medical Emergencies During a Half Marathon Race - The Influence of Weather2019In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 312-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to analyze the influence of weather conditions on medical emergencies in a half-marathon, specifically by evaluating its relation to the number of non-finishers, ambulance-required assistances, and collapses in need of ambulance as well as looking at the location of such emergencies on the race course. Seven years of data from the world's largest half marathon were used. Meteorological data were obtained from a nearby weather station, and the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) index was used as a measure of general weather conditions. Of the 315,919 race starters, 104 runners out of the 140 ambulance-required assistances needed ambulance services due to collapses. Maximum air temperature and PET significantly co-variated with ambulance-required assistances, collapses, and non-finishers (R (2) =0.65-0.92; p=0.001-0.03). When air temperatures vary between 15-29 degrees C, an increase of 1 degrees C results in an increase of 2.5 (0.008/1000) ambulance-required assistances, 2.5 (0.008/1000) collapses (needing ambulance services), and 107 (0.34/1000) non-finishers. The results also indicate that when the daily maximum PET varies between 18-35 degrees C, an increase of 1 degrees C PET results in an increase of 1.8 collapses (0.006/1000) needing ambulance services and 66 non-finishers (0.21/1000).

  • 12.
    Grundel, Alexandra
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Mobiltelefonens inverkan på bilföraren - en litteraturstudie2012Report (Other academic)
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  • 13.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Investigating the fall-injury reducing effect of impact absorbing flooring among female nursing home residents: initial results2015In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 320-32-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:Fall-related injuries affect the lives of elderly to a substantial degree. This quasi-experimental study investigates the fall-injury reducing effect of impact absorbing flooring among female nursing home residents.

    METHODS:The intervention site is a nursing home in Sweden where impact absorbing flooring was installed in parts of one of six wards (six out of 10 apartments (excluding bathrooms), the communal dining-room and parts of the corridor). The impact absorbing flooring is a 12 mm thick closed cell flexible polyurethane/polyurea composite tile (500×500 mm) with an exterior surface of polyurethane/polyurea. A generalised linear model (log-binomial) was used to calculate the RR of injury from falls on impact absorbing flooring compared to falls on regular flooring, adjusted for age, body mass index, visual and cognitive impairments.

    RESULTS:During the study period (1 October 2011 to 31 March 2014), 254 falls occurred on regular flooring and 77 falls on impact absorbing flooring. The injury/fall rate was 30.3% for falls on regular flooring and 16.9% for falls on impact absorbing flooring. Adjusted for covariates, the impact absorbing flooring significantly reduced the RR of injury in the event of a fall by 59% (RR 0.41 (95% Cl 0.20 to 0.80)).

    CONCLUSIONS:This is, to our knowledge, the first study evaluating the injury-reducing effect of impact absorbing flooring in a nursing home showing statistically significant effect. The results from this study are promising, indicating the considerable potential of impact absorbing flooring as a fall-related injury intervention among frail elderly.

  • 14.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    A quasi-experimental evaluation of compliant flooring in a residential care setting2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201290Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fall injuries affect the lives of older people to a substantial degree. This quasi-experimental observational study investigates the potential fall injury reducing effect of a compliant flooring in a residential care setting.

    Methods

    The allocation of the compliant flooring was non-random. Data on fall-events and individual characteristics were collected in a residential care unit during a period of 68 months. The primary outcome was the fall injury rate per fall, and a logistic regression analysis was used to test for the effect of complaint flooring. Falls per 1000 bed days was the secondary outcome, used to measure the difference in fall risk on compliant flooring versus regular flooring.

    Results

    The event dataset is an unbalanced panel with repeated observations on 114 individuals, with 70% women. The mean age was 84.9 years of age, the average Body Mass Index (BMI) was 24.7, and there was a mean of 6.57 (SD: 15.28) falls per individual. The unadjusted effect estimate showed a non-significant relative risk injury reduction of 29% per fall (RR 0.71 [95% CI: 0.46–1.09]) compared to regular flooring. Re-estimating, excluding identified outliers, showed an injury risk reduction of 63% (RR 0.37 [95% CI: 0.25–0.54]). Falls per 1000 bed days showed that individuals living in apartments with compliant flooring had a fall rate of 5.3 per 1000 bed days compared to a fall rate of 8.4 per 1000 bed days among individuals living in regular apartments. This corresponds to an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 0.63 (95% exact Poisson CI: 0.50–0.80).

    Conclusion

    The results of this non-randomized study indicate that compliant flooring has the potential to reduce the risk of fall injury without increasing the fall risk among older people in a Swedish residential care setting.

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    Gustavsson_et_al_2018
  • 15.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Jernbro, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    There is more to Life than Risk Avoidance: Elderly Peoples Perspectives of Falls and Compliant Flooring2018In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 1479586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Falls are the most common cause of injury in all ages and are especiallydifficult to prevent among residential care residents. Compliant flooring has beenproposed as a measure to prevent fall-injury, however little is known regarding theimplementation aspects in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to explore thefrail elderly person's view on falls, the risk of fall-injury, prevention in general andspecifically compliant flooring as an injury preventative measure. Methods. In this qualitative study, we used the grounded theory method and conductedin depths interviews with eight elderly people in residential care.Results. The identified categories were Falling as a part of life, Fearing theconsequences and A wish to prevent falls and injuries. Through the results is was clearthat There is more to life than risk avoidance, permeated the interviews, thereforeforming the grounded theory. The interviewees viewed falls as something common andnormal, and were uninterested in focusing on the risk of falls. Although they wanted toprevent falls, it was often difficult to integrate preventative measures into their everydaylife. They embraced the idea of an injury reducing compliant flooring, but their maininterests lie elsewhere.Conclusions. The results in this paper propose explanations on the obstacles ofimplementing fall prevention measures in an elderly frail population. The findings cangive us insights as to why interest, compliance for active fall prevention measures arelow, and on various factors that have to be taken under consideration in the process ofconstructing prevention. Compliant flooring is a passive fall injury prevention measurethat does not require the target group to make active decisions, adapt or activelyparticipate in the program. Therefore, we conclude that complaint flooring, from theperspective of the residents, can work well in residential care.

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  • 16.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Fallskador bland äldre: steg för steg2015In: Personsäkerhet - teori och praktik / [ed] Ragnar Andersson, Per Nilsen, Karlstad: Myndigheten för Samhällsskydd och Beredskap (MSB) , 2015, p. 179-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Trends on fall induced injury morbidity and mortality among the elderly in Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Fall och fallskador hos äldre – en introduktion2011Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Preventing fall injuries among elderly by shock absorbing flooring2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Within nursing homes, the fall-related fracture incidence rate is between 5 and 10 %. For those living in nursing homes there are limited options for active fall injury prevention, due to physical impairments and diseases. Instead, passive fall injury prevention is a more realistic alternative. Shock absorbing flooring has been suggested as a potential passive safety measure for this group of individuals.

    Aims/Objectives/Purpose. To evaluate the fall injury reducing effect of shock absorbing flooring in a nursing home setting in Sunne, Sweden.

    Methods. The study is case controlled, with the shock absorbing flooring installed on one ward with a maximum of 12 residents and the other 5 wards are controls. The total number of residents including control wards is approximately 60. Baseline measurements are made with estimates of the risk of falling as well as the risk of fall-related injury.

    Results/Outcome. After one year, there has been 22 falls on the shock absorbing flooring, with no resulting injury compared to 130 falls and 4 fractures on the control wards. An unexpected finding is that the acoustic environment has improved considerably, creating a calmer environment for the elderly.

    Significance/Contribution to the field. To our knowledge, this is the first time a shock absorbing flooring has been tested and evaluated as a means of injury preventionin a nursing home. Although this is a pilot study, it contributes towards improved passive safety  for this frail group of elderly.

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    PREVENTING FALL INJURIES AMONG ELDERLY BY SHOCK ABSORBING FLOORING
  • 20.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Stötabsorberande golv som fallskadepreventiv åtgärd – resultat efter ett år2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I april 2011 lades ett stötabsorberande golv, framtaget för att förhindra skador vid fall, in på ett särskilt boende i Sunne kommun. Sedan 1 oktober 2011 har data om fallhändelser samlats in för att följa upp effekter av golvet. Det som undersöks är konsekvenser av fall på olika golvunderlag samt om risken att ramla påverkas.

    Under den tid som studien pågått (12 mån) har 21 fall registrerats på det stötabsorberande golvet, ingen har skadats sig allvarligt och en har skadats lindrigt som en följd av dessa fall. På övriga golvytor med fler boende har 156 fall registrerats, varav fem lett till fraktur och 30 till lindrig skada. Resultaten hittills tyder på att golvet kan ha den eftersträvade effekten.

    Det stötabsorberande golvet bidrar också till en dämpad ljudnivå vilket personalen upplever som positivt.

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    fulltext
  • 21.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Rahm, GullBritt
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Jernbro, Carolina
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Effects of Impact-Absorbing Flooring in Residential Care from the Perspectives of Enrolled Nurses2017In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 367-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Falls are a daily occurrence in nursing homes and few interventions for reducing fall-related injuries have proven to be effective. Impact absorbing flooring (IAF) in residential care has shown promising results in reducing fail-injuries and in the process of developing and implementing IAF all aspects are valuable to explore. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study is to describe the enrolled nurses (ENs) experiences of IAF. We carried out focus group interviews with ENs and used content analysis to process the data. The ENs experienced both negative and positive aspects with the IAF. Importantly, the ENs perceived the IAF as effective in preventing fall-injuries. They also appreciated the improvements in acoustics. Negative aspects were that the flooring initially was challenging to walk on and that it made it harder to maneuver heavy equipment. A significant and transferable finding in this study was the importance of the ENs' perceived difficulty in preventing fall-injuries amongst elderly people living in nursing homes. This seemed to be a driving force to accept the intervention. Although IAF affects the working conditions in a nursing home, ENs are willing to accept these issues given the perceived effectiveness of the intervention.

  • 22.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Huss, Fredrik
    Burn Center, Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The state of the residential fire fatality problem in Sweden: Epidemiology, risk factors, and event typologies2017In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 62, p. 89-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Residential fires represent the largest category of fatal fires in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of fatal residential fires in Sweden and to identify clusters of events.

    Method

    Data was collected from a database that combines information on fatal fires with data from forensic examinations and the Swedish Cause of Death-register. Mortality rates were calculated for different strata using population statistics and rescue service turnout reports. Cluster analysis was performed using multiple correspondence analysis with agglomerative hierarchical clustering.

    Results

    Male sex, old age, smoking, and alcohol were identified as risk factors, and the most common primary injury diagnosis was exposure to toxic gases. Compared to non-fatal fires, fatal residential fires more often originated in the bedroom, were more often caused by smoking, and were more likely to occur at night. Six clusters were identified. The first two clusters were both smoking-related, but were separated into (1) fatalities that often involved elderly people, usually female, whose clothes were ignited (17% of the sample), (2) middle-aged (45–64 years old), (often) intoxicated men, where the fire usually originated in furniture (30%). Other clusters that were identified in the analysis were related to (3) fires caused by technical fault, started in electrical installations in single houses (13%), (4) cooking appliances left on (8%), (5) events with unknown cause, room and object of origin (25%), and (6) deliberately set fires (7%).

    Conclusions

    Fatal residential fires were unevenly distributed in the Swedish population. To further reduce the incidence of fire mortality, specialized prevention efforts that focus on the different needs of each cluster are required.

    Practical applications

    Cooperation between various societal functions, e.g. rescue services, elderly care, psychiatric clinics and other social services, with an application of both human and technological interventions, should reduce residential fire mortality in Sweden.

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    Jonsson2017
  • 23.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Huss, Fredrik
    Uppsala University .
    Seriously injured due to residential fires in sweden2018In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 24, p. A16-A16, article id PA 07-5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Runefors, Marcus
    Särdqvist, Stefan
    Fire-related mortality in Sweden: Temporal trends 1952 to 20132015In: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1697-1707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines temporal trends in deaths due to fire-related accidents in Sweden from 1952 to 2013 based on statistics in the Cause of Death register held by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Fatalities coded with underlying cause of death associated with fire-related accidents are included and absolute numbers and age-adjusted mortality rates are calculated and statistically analysed for trends using Poisson regression. The results show a significant reduction in both absolute numbers and in the age-adjusted mortality rate with a decline in absolute number of deaths of 34% over the period. However, the elderly population (80+ years) showed a significant increase in absolute numbers. Regarding the age-adjusted mortality rate, a significant reduction of 63% was observed and children aged 0 to 4 years showed the largest decrease (91%). A reduction was seen both in terms of fatalities due to burns and carbon monoxide poisoning, although the reduction was more pronounced with regards to burns (69% compared to 46%). Although an overall decrease was observed in both absolute numbers and in the age-adjusted mortality rate, with an aging population, the absolute numbers of fire-related deaths for the elderly population will most likely increase in the future. Therefore, whilst previously a child-injury issue, fire-related deaths in Sweden is now predominantly an issue of safety for the elderly. In combination with more deaths now being attributed to carbon monoxide poisoning, new preventative strategies may be required

  • 25.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Runefors, Marcus
    Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden..
    Sardqvist, Stefan
    Swedish Civil Contingencies Agcy, Lund, Sweden..
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Fire-related mortality in sweden-temporal trends 1952-20132016In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 22, p. A151-A152Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Khorram-Manesh, Amir
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces Defense Medicine Centre, Sweden.
    Löf, Therese
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Börjesson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Thorsson, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlström, Eric
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University of Southeast Norway, Norway.
    Profiling Collapsing Half Marathon Runners-Emerging Risk Factors: Results from Gothenburg Half Marathon2020In: Sports, E-ISSN 2075-4663, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-11, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among several serious medical conditions, arrhythmia and heat stroke are two important causes of death during endurance races. Clinically, collapsing might be the first sign of these serious conditions and may mimic the more common and benign exercise-associated collapse. Several risk factors have been reported in the literature. We aimed to conduct a qualitative study to find a perceived risk profile among runners who collapsed and who were transported by ambulances to the nearest hospital during Gothenburg's half marathon (2010-2017). Collapsing runners seem to lack the ability to make a decision to withdraw from the contest despite being exhausted. They feel the pain, but are unable to put meaning to their feeling, to adjust their pacing, and to handle other influences. Consequently, they do not overcome the problem or assess the situation. These individual mental characteristics may indicate a unique profile for collapsing runners. Pre-race health control and educational initiatives aiming at mental preparedness and information before endurance races might be a necessary step to avoid life-threatening complications.

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  • 27.
    Luning, H.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg.
    Mangelus, C.
    Univ Gothenburg.
    Carlstrom, E.
    Univ Gothenburg.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Borjesson, M.
    Univ Gothenburg.
    Incidence and characteristics of severe exercise-associated collapse at the world's largest half-marathon2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0217465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Whilst many health benefits are associated with regular exercise, medical complications may occur during higher-intensity activities, such as long distance running contests. The most common complication is collapse. However, the incidence and characteristics of these collapses are not very well studied. Method This is a retrospective study of severe collapse, defined as a patient in need of advanced medical care after a collapse, during the large Gothenburg's half marathon, Goteborgsvarvet. The study included 230,501 competitors during the study-period of 5 years (20132017) with data being collected from medical race tents and using ambulance data. Vital signs, treatment and blood gas samples were noted and analyzed. Results The incidence of severe collapse was 1.53 per 1000 starting runners. The average age for patients was 34 years old and no difference in incidence were seen between male and female runners. The typical collapsed runner presented with tachycardia, normal systolic blood pressure, elevated body temperature and metabolic acidosis. The most common medical encounter was exercise-associated collapse. Conclusion The incidence of severe collapse was similar to findings in other studies, even though this study was set in different part of the world. Typical characteristics of a collapsed runner were identified providing new information which could be beneficial in the medical planning of larger running competitions and future preventative interventions. Importantly, life threatening conditions seem uncommon; no case of hyponatremia and only two cases of hypoglycemia were seen.

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    Luning2019
  • 28.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Svensson, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Via Spatiosa: Festschrift to Ragnar Andersson on his 67th birthday2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk management is a comparatively new, and most definitely complex, research field, combining knowledge from several other disciplines such as medicine, engineering, economics and psychology, to name a few. Consequently, risk management is important in a variety of subjects and disciplines, clearly illustrated in this festschrift. Professor Ragnar Andersson has played an important roll in not only promoting the importance of risk management and injury prevention, but also developing a deeper understanding of the field through always actively choosing a broad, multi-disciplinary perspective. In other words, he has always chosen “via spatiosa”. Or in Swedish, “den breda vägen”

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    Via_Spatiosa
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    presentationsbild
  • 29.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Developing a process model on the complexity of fall-induced injuries2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    En kunskapsöversikt om energiabsorberande golvs effekt på frakturprevalensen bland äldre personer2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Fall-Related Injuries Amongst Elderly in Sweden: Still an Emerging Risk?2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, injuries due to falls are the most common cause of injury-related hospitalization and injury-related death amongst elderly. Also, during the 20th century, increasing trends in fall-related injuries have been observed in many high-income countries. Whilst fall-related injury trends have been reported from national studies in other comparable countries, no studies from Sweden using national data have been published, despite this issue sometimes being pointed out as one of the most important emerging societal risks both in Sweden and elsewhere. With large individual and societal costs, as well as prognosticated continued increases in high-income countries, the aim of this thesis is to update the knowledge on the trends of fall-related injuries amongst elderly in Sweden and to determine whether the issue is still to be considered an emerging risk.

    National injury morbidity and mortality data from Sweden can show that with regards to all hospitalized fall-related injuries as well as hip fractures, the risk is decreasing. However, diverging trends are observed in age- and sex-specific groups, with younger elderly now having considerably lower rates of fall-related injuries, whilst older elderly are increasingly hospitalized due to minor fall-related injuries. Also, amongst older elderly, increasing hip fracture mortality trends are observed. With regards to sex-specific groups, although fall-related injuries in general are more common amongst women, the injury trends for women are generally decreasing at a quicker rate than for men. Also, contradictorily to almost all fall-related injury morbidity, hip fracture mortality risk is higher amongst men.

    This thesis can show a change in trend in fall-related injuries amongst elderly in Sweden since the turn of the century, apart from amongst older elderly and with regards to hip fracture mortality. The implications on prognoses needs to be studied further as do the underlying causes behind this shift in trend.

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  • 32.
    Nilson, Finn
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Trends in hip fracture incidence rates among elderly in Sweden 1987-20092012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, RagnarKarlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Alkoholrelaterade skador och olyckor bland barn och ungdomar2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 34.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Energiabsorberande golvs effekt på frakturprevalensen bland äldre personer2010Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Relationen mellan BMI och fallinducerade höftledsfrakturer bland äldre personer2010Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, RagnarKarlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety.
    Riskbedömning av kokande kranar2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Dahlén, Sandra
    Sarkopeni som riskfaktor för fallskador bland äldre personer2010Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Bodin, Maja
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Janson, Staffan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences.
    Sammanfattning och rekommendationer2011Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Publ Safety, Dept Environm & Life Sci, Div Risk & Environm Studies, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad Univ, Ctr Publ Safety, Dept Environm & Life Sci, Div Risk & Environm Studies, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Hlth Metr Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Household Fire Protection Practices in Relation to Socio-demographic Characteristics: Evidence from a Swedish National SurveyIn: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sociodemographic inequalities in the ownership of residential fire safety equipment, fire prevention practices and fire protection knowledge was studied using an inductive and data-driven approach based on the responses to a national Swedish survey containing individual-level data on several dimensions of home fire safety practices (n = 7507). Cluster analysis was used to summarise home fire safety data and sociodemographic characteristics of the sample were then regressed on the data ordinal regression analysis. The results showed significant correlations between the level of fire protection and a range of factors (sex, age, family composition, income, housing type and country of birth), suggesting a positive effect of socioeconomic success. Further, the results imply that having experienced a residential fire has a positive impact on future fire protection practices, and that higher levels of fire protection interest increases the probability of having a functional smoke detector.

  • 40.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety. Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    The effect of the transition from the ninth to the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases on external cause registration of injury morbidity in Sweden2015In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 189-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Revisions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) have previously been shown to cause dramatic effects with regard to injury mortality data when implemented. However, limited knowledge exists on the effects on the coding of external causes of injury morbidity, despite this being an important aspect with regard to injury prevention.

    Method Hospitalised injuries in Sweden were studied using time series intervention analysis to observe the effect of the ICD change from ICD-9 to ICD-10 in 1997 on external cause coding.

    Results The results would suggest considerable coding issues with a large spike in the proportion of injury admissions registered without an external cause code in 1997, with continuing, although gradually diminishing, problems up to 2002. The coding change seems to have had an immediate effect on all external cause of injury categories, although the categories that were not directly convertible from ICD-9 to ICD-10 were seemingly more greatly affected.

    Discussion The study illustrates the potential issues associated with changes between ICD revisions and the importance of data quality control both during surveillance and collection of data, but also when presenting injury trends across ICD versions.

  • 41.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Differences in determinants amongst individuals reporting residential fires in Sweden – results from a cross-sectional study 2015In: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099, Fire Technology, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 615-626Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Jonsson, Anders
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Differences in determinants amongst individuals reporting residential fires in sweden-: results from a cross-sectional study2016In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 22, p. A40-A40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Börjesson, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Mortality in long-distance running races in Sweden - 2007–20162018In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background During the last decade, an increasing popularity of marathons has been seen. Although running has been shown to have considerable positive health effects, the risk of sudden death, most often due to sudden cardiac arrests, is also a risk runners expose themselves to. Whilst there are some studies on the mortality amongst long-distance runners, much of the evidence is dated. Given the increased popularity in running during the 21st century as well as the improvements in medical care at marathons, more knowledge is required on the mortality risk. Materials and method Publicly available racing and news databases were used to identify the number of entrants and finishers in half to full marathons in Sweden between 2007 and 2016 and the number of deaths that occurred in conjunction with the races. Results A total of 1,156,271 runners entered a long distance (21-42km) running race in Sweden between 2007 and 2016, and 834,412 runners finished the races (72.2%). A large majority of the finishers (677,050 (81%)) competed in distances under a full marathon. Two deaths occurred during the time period, meaning that the death rate was 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.04–0.79) per 100,000 finishers. Conclusions This study can show that death rates in long distance running races between 2007 and 2016 in Sweden are very low, compared to previous studies. When added to the existing literature, the combined picture suggests a general downward trend in the risk of death during marathons since the 1980s. 

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    Nilsson_Börjesson_2018
  • 44.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Damsager, John
    Lauritsen, Jens
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark..
    Bonander, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    The effect of breed-specific dog legislation on hospital treated dog bites in Odense, Denmark: A time series intervention study2018In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0208393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As dog bite injuries are a considerable problem in modern society, in order to reduce such injuries, breed-specific legislation has been introduced in a number of countries. Whilst many studies have shown a lack of effect with such legislation, the commonly used methodology is known to be flawed. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the Danish breed-specific legislation on the number of dog bite injuries using more credible methods. A time series intervention method was used on a detailed dataset from Odense University Hospital, Denmark, regarding dog bite injuries presented to the emergency department. The results indicate that banning certain breeds has a highly limited effect on the overall levels of dog bite injuries, and that an enforcement of the usage of muzzle and leash in public places for these breeds also has a limited effect. Despite using more credible and sound methods, this study supports previous studies showing that breed-specific legislation seems to have no effect on dog bite injuries. In order to minimise dog bite injuries in the future, it would seem that other interventions or non-breed-specific legislation should be considered as the primary option.

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    fulltext
  • 45.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Jonsson, Anders
    Myndigheten för samhällsskydd och beredskap.
    Elolyckor i Sverige2019Report (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 46.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Palm, Gunnar
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lundgren, Linnea
    Ersta Sköndahl.
    Rayner, David
    University of Gothenburg.
    Börjesson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg.
    Thorsson, Sofia
    University of Gothenburg.
    Khorram‐Manesh, Amir
    University of Gothenburg.
    Carlström, Eric
    University of Gothenburg.
    Can participants predict where ambulance‐requiring cases occur at a half marathon?2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 2760-2766Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Lindberg, Fredrik
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Palm, Gunnar
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundgren, Linnea
    Ersta Skondal.
    Rayner, David
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Thorsson, Sofia
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Khorram-Manesh, Amir
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Carlström, Eric
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Testing a novel method for identifying where serious medical encounters occur at marathons in order to improve medical preparedness and runners’ safety2018In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 24, p. A29-A29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013). Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Centre for Public Safety (from 2013).
    Lundkvist, Erik
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Science.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).
    Has the second ‘running boom’ democratized running? A study on the sociodemographic characteristics of finishers at the world’s largest half marathon2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that runners differ in terms of sociodemographic characteristics. However, given the increase in participants at running races, the question arises whether these sociodemographic differences have been erased and if the second running boom has democratized running. An online questionnaire was sent to a randomized sample (n = 2378) of finishers at the 2017 Gothenburg half marathon (Göteborgsvarvet). The self-reported sociodemographic variables were then compared to Swedish national averages. The results show that Göteborgsvarvet finishers are considerably more likely to be men, well-educated and employed, compared to the general population of Sweden. This study indicates, therefore, that half marathon finishers are still distinctly different in terms of sociodemographic variables compared to the general population. These differences need to be taken into consideration when conclusions are drawn concerning running and its health effects on runners.

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  • 49.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    A comparison of hip fracture incidence rates among elderly in Sweden by latitude and sunlight exposure2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Nilson, Finn
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Moniruzzaman, Syed
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Andersson, Ragnar
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Fall-related fracture trends among elderly in Sweden – exploring transitions among hospitalized cases2013In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, no 45, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem

    Fall-related injuries have been a cause of worry during the end of the 20th century with increasing trends among the elderly.

    Method

    Using data from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) based on hospital admissions, this study explores the trends in fall-related fractures between 1998 and 2010.

    Results

    The data shows a decreasing trend in fall-related fractures in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from men 80 years and above. While hip fracture incidence rates decreased in all age- and sex-specific groups, both central fractures and upper extremity fractures have increased in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from women 65–79 years. Lower extremity fractures have increased in the older age groups and decreased in the younger. Discussion: The differences found between the groups of fractures and by age- and sex-specific groups indicate a possible transition where more serious fractures are decreasing while less serious fractures increase among hospitalized cases.

    Summary

    Perhaps due to a focus on hip fracture prevention, this study shows that while the incidence rate of hospitalized hip fractures has decreased, other fall-related hospitalized fractures have increased.

    Impact on industry

    Potentially, this could be indicative of a healthier younger elderly, coupled with a frailer older elderly requiring more comprehensive healthcare also for less serious injuries. Further research is needed to confirm our results.

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