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  • 1.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Norman, Therese
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Tillgänglighet, innovationsprocesser och tillväxt2015Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Mångfald och utveckling av långsiktigt hållbara innovationsmiljöer2014Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Backman, Mikaela
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Bjerke, Lina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Johansson, Sara
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wallin, Tina
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Platsbunden innovationsförmåga och arbetskraftens sammansättning2014Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Gråsjö, UrbanHögskolan Väst.Wixe, SofiaJönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy: Knowledge, Technology and Internationalization2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades we have been able to witness a veritable revolution in the world economy, with dramatic changes in the competitiveness of nations, regions and companies. The most commonly used term to describe this revolution has been ‘globalization’, even if there is no common definition of this term in the literature. In fact, all definitions of globalization are elusive and elicit criticism (Thurik et al., 2013). Generally, the term is connected with the rapid increase in the free movement of goods, capital, people, ideas, information and knowledge around the globe. The shift of economic activities between regions in different national spheres ranks among the most vigorous changes shaping the economic landscape of today (Dreher et al., 2008). Much of the discussion about globalization has been held at a rather superficial macroeconomic level. Discussions at the meso- and microeconomic level, that is, the level of regions and companies, have been much less common, and many have also been biased in the sense that they have only given a partial picture. One obvious example is that discussions on the role of innovation and entrepreneurship have tended to use a narrow definition of entrepreneurship as the start-up of new companies; as a result they have ignored the high degree of innovation and entrepreneurship within many incumbent companies. This is problematic, since innovation and entrepreneurship, generating new technologies, new products and new production processes, are at the core of economic development and growth (Hall, 1999).

  • 5.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    What is Smart Rural Development?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Naldi, Lucia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    What is smart rural development?2015In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 40, p. 90-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2010, the European Union adopted the notion ‘smart’ in its new ten-year growth strategy Europe 2020 stating that Europe should become a smart, sustainable, and inclusive economy. The broad and policy-oriented concepts of smart growth and smart development are part of the strategy introduced as a response to the observed low growth rates of innovation and productivity across European regions. In all its essence, the growth strategy states that smart growth supports sustainable development, which is achieved by promoting research, innovation, and knowledge in order to attain regional economic growth. What is made less clear is how the concept of smart growth can be translated to fit a diverse set of rural regions. Other outstanding issues discussed in this paper relate to the possibility to measure and empirically address the outcome of policies for smart rural development. Hence, in this paper we conceptually analyse and bring together the ideas that underlie the logic behind policies for smart growth by focusing on smart growth from the perspective of rural regions. The paper also presents indicators of smart rural development and analyses their relevance in future empirical studies.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Pia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). KTH, Urbana och regionala studier.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    The influence of related and unrelated variety on firm performance in European urban and rural areas2015In: Social capital and development trends in rural areas: Vol. 10 / [ed] Yvonne von Friedrichs, Hans Westlund, Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Jönköping: Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School , 2015, p. 159-178Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Nilsson, Pia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, ESOL (Entrepreneurship, Strategy, Organization, Leadership). Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics.
    The Influence of Related and Unrelated Variety on Firm Performance across European Urban and Rural Regions2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Firm knowledge, neighborhood diversity and innovation2015In: Regional development in an international context: regional, national, cross border and international factors for growth and development: revised papers presented at the 18th Uddevalla Symposium, 11–13 June, 2015, Sønderborg, Denmark / [ed] Irene Bernhard, Trollhättan: University West , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Neighbourhood related diversity, human capital and firm innovation2018In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 217-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the importance of neighbourhood related diversity and firm human capital for firms' propensity to innovate is tested. Neighbourhood diversity is treated as a source of localized knowledge spillovers, that is, Jacobs' externalities, where diversity is measured in terms of industries and employee education. The results show that firms in metropolitan regions benefit from related industry diversity while service sector firms in rural regions are more innovative in neighbourhoods with more related diversity in education. Firm characteristics such as education and skills among the employees provide to be strong determinants of firm innovativeness, especially for firms outside metropolitan regions.

  • 11.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Regional diversity and economic performance2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of an introductory chapter and four individual papers. In each paper the relationship between some form of spatial diversity and economic performance is analyzed. Diversity is treated as a potential source of externality effects, mainly in the form of knowledge spillovers.

    The first paper studies the impact of a broad range of spatial externalities on the productivity of manufacturing plants. While finding positive effects of specialization and competition, there is no support for positive spillovers of either related or unrelated industry diversity. The second paper argues that relatedness should be framed at the level of individuals and consequently should be measured in terms of, for example, education and occupation rather than industry belonging. The results show that educational- and occupational related diversity matter for regional productivity growth, while related industry diversity is positively related to employment growth.

    The third paper analyzes the importance of neighborhood related diversity, in terms of both industries and education, and internal human capital for firms’ propensity to innovate. The findings support that education and skills are strongly related to firm innovation. Additionally, firms in metropolitan regions are more innovative in neighborhoods with more related diversity in industries, while firms in rural regions seem to benefit more from related diversity in education. In the fourth paper, the location factor of interest is segregation, which may be regarded as inverse diversity. The results show that neighborhood segregation has a negative effect on individual employment. However, it is not the spatial separation of individuals with different backgrounds that causes lower employment but rather the distress of segregated neighborhoods.

  • 12.
    Wixe, Sofia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics, Finance and Statistics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The impact of spatial externalities: Skills, education and plant productivity2015In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 2053-2069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the role of a broad range of spatial externalities in explaining average labour productivity of Swedish manufacturing plants. The main findings show positive effects from general urbanization economies and labour market matching, as well as a negative effect from within-industry diversity. These results confirm previous research despite methodological differences,which implies wider generalizability. Additionally, the empirical findings support Marshall–Arrow–Romer (MAR) and Porter externalities, i.e. positive effects from specialization and competition. No evidence is found of Jacobs externalities, neither when measured as between-industry diversity nor as within-industry diversity. Finally, plant-specific characteristics play a key role in explaining plant-level productivity.

  • 13.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies (CESIS).
    Which types of relatedness matter in regional growth: Industry, occupation and education2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Andersson, Martin
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University.
    Which Types of Relatedness Matter in Regional Growth? Industry, Occupation and Education2017In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 523-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a conceptual discussion of relatedness, which suggests a focus on individuals as a complement to firms and industries. The empirical relevance of the main arguments is tested by estimating the effects of related and unrelated variety in education and occupation among employees, as well as in industries, on regional growth. The results show that occupational and educational related variety are positively correlated with productivity growth, which supports the conceptual discussion put forth in the paper. In addition, related variety in industries is found to be negative for productivity growth, but positive for employment growth.

  • 15.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Skills, education and productivity - Firm level evidence on the presence of externalities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Skills, education and productivity in the KIBS sector - Firm level evidence on the presence of externalities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Disentangling innovation in small food firms: The role of external knowledge, support, and collaboration2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies unique survey data on innovation and external interaction of small food producers in Sweden.The overall purpose is to test if firms that are more engaged in external interaction are more innovative. To disentangle innovativeness beyond new goods and services, innovation is measured as new processes, new markets, new suppliers, new ways of organization, and new distributors. Findings point to a positive relationship between firm innovation and external interaction, both in terms of collaboration, external knowledge and support from regional actors. In particular, collaboration regarding transports and sales is shown to enhance most types of innovation. Product and process innovation benefit from external knowledge from extra-regional firms as well as regional support from the largest firm. Findings suggest that current innovation policies can improve their efficiency by increasing their flexibility to enable tailor-made innovation policies at the local level.

  • 18.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Nilsson, Pia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics.
    Naldi, Lucia
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Business Administration. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Center for Family Enterprise and Ownership (CeFEO).
    Westlund, Hans
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Disentangling innovation in small food firms: The role of external knowledge, support, and collaboration2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Segregation and individual employment: A longitudinal study of neighborhood effects2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test whether individuals who live in more-segregated neighborhoods have a lower propensity to be employed. We apply an individual fixed effects strategy in order to reduce issues of self-selection and individual heterogeneity. This is possible due to access to full population micro-data, which allows us to follow the same group of individuals between 1990 and 2011. The results show that individuals who live in segregated neighborhoods are less likely to be employed, primarily in metropolitan regions. This effect is mainly driven by males with foreign background. However, it is not spatial separation per se that causes the negative effect on employment but rather the distress of segregated neighborhoods. This indicates that these neighborhoods provide fewer opportunities for labor market integration, which is particularly challenging for already disadvantaged individuals. The results thus have a strong bearing on policy concerning both integration and urban planning.

  • 20.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Segregation and individual employment: A longitudinal study of neighborhood effectsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we test whether individuals who live in more-segregated neighborhoods have a lower propensity to be employed. We apply an individual fixed effects strategy in order to reduce issues of self-selection and individual heterogeneity. This is possible due to access to full population micro-data, which allows us to follow the same group of individuals between 1990 and 2011. The results show that individuals who live in segregated neighborhoods are less likely to be employed, primarily in metropolitan regions. This effect is mainly driven by males with foreign background. However, it is not spatial separation per se that causes the negative effect on employment but rather the distress of segregated neighborhoods. This indicates that these neighborhoods provide fewer opportunities for labor market integration, which is particularly challenging for already disadvantaged individuals. The results thus have a strong bearing on policy concerning both integration and urban planning.

  • 21.
    Wixe, Sofia
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    Pettersson, Lars
    Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Economics. Jönköping University, Jönköping International Business School, JIBS, Centre for Entrepreneurship and Spatial Economics (CEnSE).
    The impact of ethnicity and segregation on labor market outcomes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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