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  • 1. Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Automatic generation of fuzzy inference rules in a reshoring decision context2019In: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, Vietnam, 2019, OSCM , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system is briefly outlined and evaluated in a highcost environment contemplating six specific decision criteria, namely cost, quality, time, flexibility, innovation and sustainability. A major challenge with fuzzy logic solutions has to do with the construction of the fuzzy inference rules. In the relocation domain, the fuzzy inference rules represent the knowledge and competence of relocation experts and they are usually created manually by the same experts. One obstacle is that the complexity of the fuzzy inference rules increases with the number of decision criteria. To overcome this complexity issue, this paper presents a solution whereby the fuzzy inference rules are automatically generated by applying one hundred reshoring scenarios as input data. The reshoring decision recommendations produced by the fuzzy logic decision-support system are demonstrated to be close to those of human reshoring domain experts.

  • 2.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Fuzzy logic based decision-support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Operations and Supply Chain Management, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, David
    Knowledge intensive decision support for reshoring decisions2018In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual NOFOMA Conference: Relevant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Research, Kolding, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer Science and Informatics, JTH, Jönköping AI Lab (JAIL).
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 7. Adlemo, Anders
    et al.
    Tarasov, Vladimir
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, David
    Reshoring decision support in a Swedish context2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a decision-support system for reshoring decision-making based on fuzzy logic. The construction and functionality of the decision-support system are described, and the functionality is evaluated in a high cost environment exemplified through a Swedish context. Ten different reshoring scenarios, provided by Swedish reshoring experts, are entered into the decision-support system and the decision recommendations provided by the system are presented. The confidence that can be put on the recommendations is demonstrated by comparing them with those of the reshoring experts. The positive results obtained indicate that fuzzy logic is both feasible and that the quality of the results are sufficiently good for reshoring decision-making.

  • 8.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2020In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 139-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 9.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2020In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 139-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 10.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean implementation in geriatric care in a municipal: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S4-87-S4-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented at geriatric care in a municipal department in Sweden, focusing on the experiences and challenges of the employees, together with the strengths and weaknesses of the lean philosophy.

    Design/methodology/approach: The primary method used was a case study with interviews and observations on spot, in combination with a literature study. All with the intention of defining and describing lean, its value, and how organizations generally apply lean.

    Findings: All sources of information have shown that there are many advantages with lean such as better communication and a better-organized workplace. In addition, lean tools help to eliminate non-value adding activities (waste). However, implementations also bring about issues and challenges such as the difficulty of creating a long lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups and the decreasing demand for lean from the executives have been the main issues within the geriatric care. The next step might be to create a common organizational culture, which is permeated with continuous improvements, focusing on value-adding activities for the residents and others stakeholders.

    Originality/value: Very few studies have addressed lean implementation in geriatric care as well as in a municipal department.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lean implementation in geriatric care in a municipal: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S4-87-S4-99Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented at geriatric care in a municipal department in Sweden, focusing on the experiences and challenges of the employees, together with the strengths and weaknesses of the lean philosophy. Design/methodology/approach: The primary method used was a case study with interviews and observations on spot, in combination with a literature study. All with the intention of defining and describing lean, its value, and how organizations generally apply lean. Findings: All sources of information have shown that there are many advantages with lean such as better communication and a better-organized workplace. In addition, lean tools help to eliminate non-value adding activities (waste). However, implementations also bring about issues and challenges such as the difficulty of creating a long lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups and the decreasing demand for lean from the executives have been the main issues within the geriatric care. The next step might be to create a common organizational culture, which is permeated with continuous improvements, focusing on value-adding activities for the residents and others stakeholders. Originality/value: Very few studies have addressed lean implementation in geriatric care as well as in a municipal department.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Lean implementation in the geriatric care sector in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 56-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented in the geriatric care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The research focuses on implementation experiences and challenges encountered. The research method used is a case study using interviews and observations for data collection. The findings indicate that there are many advantages of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as better communication, organisation and workflow. The lean implementation worked as an eye-opener and created a situation, where the employees realised a great deal of waste in the daily operations. In addition, lean tools helped to reduce the waste. The findings also indicate that there are some challenges of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as the difficulty to create long-lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups, decreasing interest from senior management and lack of a holistic view were the main issues in the case organisation.

  • 13. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lean implementation in the geriatric care sector in Sweden2015In: International Journal of Six Sigma and Competitive Advantage (IJSSCA), ISSN 1479-2494, E-ISSN 1479-2753, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 56-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to examine how lean has been implemented in the geriatric care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The research focuses on implementation experiences and challenges encountered. The research method used is a case study using interviews and observations for data collection. The findings indicate that there are many advantages of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as better communication, organisation and workflow. The lean implementation worked as an eye-opener and created a situation, where the employees realised a great deal of waste in the daily operations. In addition, lean tools helped to reduce the waste. The findings also indicate that there are some challenges of lean in the geriatric care sector, such as the difficulty to create long-lasting lean commitment. A lack of follow-ups, decreasing interest from senior management and lack of a holistic view were the main issues in the case organisation.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Business Unit Networks, Microwave and Access Supply, Ericsson, Borås, Sweden.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Department of Industrial Management, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Kouvola, Finland.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 904-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elaborate, how the use of a joint-use strategy of Lean and Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, and agility. Telecom manufacturing has been under tremendous change after dot.com bubble burst in the early 2000, and new competition has originated from Asia. Being successful requires now more than before, and joint-use of strategies is one option to survive.

    Design/methodology/approach – A single case study from a Swedish company operating in the telecom manufacturing was conducted. In particular, a Six Sigma project was followed and analyzed during 2002. However, the outcome of the Six Sigma project has been studied in longitudinal manner until 2014.

    Findings – The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today's highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications – This study is limited to large company that usually has a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis as well as has level of control of the supply chain operations. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies and thus it may be more difficult to realize the Lean Six Sigma strategy in such environment. On the other hand, the processes in these companies are often less complex.

    Practical implications – This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes as well as how to perform a Six Sigma project in Lean environment, in a proper manner.

    Originality/value – This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy. The paper will also serve as a basis for other companies and industries, on how to survive in difficult times.

  • 15. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 904-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to elaborate, how the use of a joint-use strategy of Lean and Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, and agility. Telecom manufacturing has been under tremendous change after dot.com bubble burst in the early 2000, and new competition has originated from Asia. Being successful requires now more than before, and joint-use of strategies is one option to survive. Design/methodology/approach – A single case study from a Swedish company operating in the telecom manufacturing was conducted. In particular, a Six Sigma project was followed and analyzed during 2002. However, the outcome of the Six Sigma project has been studied in longitudinal manner until 2014. Findings – The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today's highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain. Research limitations/implications – This study is limited to large company that usually has a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis as well as has level of control of the supply chain operations. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies and thus it may be more difficult to realize the Lean Six Sigma strategy in such environment. On the other hand, the processes in these companies are often less complex. Practical implications – This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes as well as how to perform a Six Sigma project in Lean environment, in a proper manner. Originality/value – This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy. The paper will also serve as a basis for other companies and industries, on how to survive in difficult times.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Ericsson AB, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S1-128-S1-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim is to examine if the joint-use strategy of Lean Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, cost-efficiency, and agility at the same time.

    Design/methodology/approach: A single case study including a Swedish company from the telecom manufacturing industry was conducted.

    Findings: A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to large companies that usually have a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies.

    Practical implications: This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes.

    Originality/value: This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014In: Proceedings of 2014 International Conference on Technology Innovation and Industrial Management, 28th-30th May 2014, Seoul, South Korea, 2014, p. S1-128-S1-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim is to examine if the joint-use strategy of Lean Six Sigma can improve flexibility, robustness, cost-efficiency, and agility at the same time. Design/methodology/approach: A single case study including a Swedish company from the telecom manufacturing industry was conducted. Findings: A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain. Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to large companies that usually have a lot of resources and choices where to put the strategic emphasis. The situation could be very different in small and medium-sized companies. Practical implications: This research provides guidance on how to manage the Lean Six Sigma strategy in order to ensure more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. Originality/value: This research provides guidance to companies regarding the applicability and properties of the Lean Six Sigma strategy.

  • 18.
    Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, Sweden.
    E-procurement beyond the buyer cost perspective2010In: Proceedings of the 22nd NOFOMA Conference, Kolding, 2010, p. 483-498Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to provide and argue for a comprehensive view of eprocurement that involves both the buyer and suppliers and that goes beyond looking at mere cost reductions on the buyer side. More specifically, the paper describes benefits and barriers of implementing e-procurement solutions for both buyers and suppliers.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports on a literature review combined with a case study. The case is a public organization in Sweden, which prepares to implement an eprocurement solution. Interviews were also conducted with a selection of suppliers to the case organization.

    Findings – In e-procurement literature, drivers and barriers are often viewed only from the perspective of a buying organization. Benefits are mainly cost-related for the buying organization, while barriers often include suppliers. It is proposed that benefits and barriers should include both buyers and suppliers. The literature review and the case study findingsform the basis for further investigation into this problem area.

    Research limitations/implications – This study focuses on a public organization in Sweden. Yet, it could have implications for many public or private organizations considering implementing e-procurement systems.

    Practical implications – This research suggest that organizations to a greater extent should take the supplier´s side into account when implementing e-procurement solutions.

    Originality/Value – The study highlights a full cycle view on e-procurement taking both buyer and supplier into account.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Persson, Anne
    University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Humanities and Informatics.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    E-procurement beyond the buyer cost perspective2010In: Proceedings of the 22nd NOFOMA Conference: Logistics and Supply Chain Management in a Globalised Economy / [ed] Jan Stentoft Arlbjørn, University of Southern Denmark , 2010, p. 483-498Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to provide and argue for a comprehensive view of e-procurement that involves both the buyer and suppliers and that goes beyond looking at mere cost reductions on the buyer side. More specifically, the paper describes benefits and barriers of implementing e-procurement solutions for both buyers and suppliers.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on a literature review combined with a case study. The case is a public organization in Sweden, which prepares to implement an e-procurement solution. Interviews were also conducted with a selection of suppliers to the case organization.

    Findings: In e-procurement literature, drivers and barriers are often viewed only from the perspective of a buying organization. Benefits are mainly cost-related for the buying organization, while barriers often include suppliers. It is proposed that benefits and barriers should include both buyers and suppliers. The literature review and the case study findings form the basis for further investigation into this problem area.

    Research limitations/implications: This study focuses on a public organization in Sweden. Yet, it could have implications for many public or private organizations considering implementing e-procurement systems.

    Practical implications: This research suggest that organizations to a greater extent should take the supplier´s side into account when implementing e-procurement solutions.

    Originality/Value: The study highlights a full cycle view on e-procurement taking both buyer and supplier into account.

  • 20. Asplund, Anna
    et al.
    Persson, Anne
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    E-procurement beyond the buyer cost perspective2010In: Proceedings of the 22nd NOFOMA Conference, Kolding, Kolding, 2010, p. 483-498Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to provide and argue for a comprehensive view of eprocurement that involves both the buyer and suppliers and that goes beyond looking at mere cost reductions on the buyer side. More specifically, the paper describes benefits and barriers of implementing e-procurement solutions for both buyers and suppliers. Design/methodology/approach – This paper reports on a literature review combined with a case study. The case is a public organization in Sweden, which prepares to implement an eprocurement solution. Interviews were also conducted with a selection of suppliers to the case organization. Findings – In e-procurement literature, drivers and barriers are often viewed only from the perspective of a buying organization. Benefits are mainly cost-related for the buying organization, while barriers often include suppliers. It is proposed that benefits and barriers should include both buyers and suppliers. The literature review and the case study findingsform the basis for further investigation into this problem area. Research limitations/implications – This study focuses on a public organization in Sweden. Yet, it could have implications for many public or private organizations considering implementing e-procurement systems. Practical implications – This research suggest that organizations to a greater extent should take the supplier´s side into account when implementing e-procurement solutions. Originality/Value – The study highlights a full cycle view on e-procurement taking both buyer and supplier into account.

  • 21. Baez, Y. P.
    et al.
    Andersson, R.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Can Lean Six Sigma philosophy help to improve collaboration to get more integrated supply chains?2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22. Baez, Y.P.
    et al.
    Andersson, R.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Can Lean Six Sigma philosophy help to improve collaboration to get more integrated supply chains?2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Brazil.
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Proceedings of the 36th Encontro Nacional de Engenharia de Produção, João Pessoa, 3-6 October, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O desenvolvimento de produtos (DP) abrange muitas atividades que devem ser executadas por profissionais de diferentes áreas, cada uma vendo o produto de uma perspectiva diferente, mas de forma complementar (ROZENFELD et al., 2006). Há uma vvertente pouco explorada na literatura sobre esse tema que estuda os pontos de contato, ou seja, as atividades que requerem integração para serem realizadas. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste artigo é caracterizar a integração interfuncional em pontos de contato presentes no DP no setor agroindustrial. Foram entrevistados 10 funcionários de duas empresas multinacionais produtoras de sementes que participavam de diversas fases dos processos de DP, sendo que foi possível obter opiniões sobre as características das fases: inicial, intermediária e final. Através da interpretação dos resultados foi possível criar um modelo próprio para explicar as fases do DP, e quais funções atuam em cada uma das fases. Observou-se que dependendo da área que a pessoa trabalha, ela participa somente de determinadas fases, diminuindo seu conhecimento sobre as fases posteriores e vice versa. Não tendo visão multidimensional, que envolve integração interfuncional, as fases do DP e os objetivos das atividades de DP, podem ocorrer conflitos que prejudicam o desenvolvimento como um todo. Isso ocorre, porque muitas vezes dentro de cada fase tem uma equipe formada de diferentes funções integradas, que possuem uma alta integração, porém na passagem de fases, muda-se a equipe e há uma baixa integração, entre as funções da equipe anterior e a equipe subsequente.

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  • 24. Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Pimenta, Marcio Lopes
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Proceedings of the 36th Encontro Nacional de Engenharia de Produção, João Pessoa, 3-6 October, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O desenvolvimento de produtos (DP) abrange muitas atividades que devem ser executadas por profissionais de diferentes áreas, cada uma vendo o produto de uma perspectiva diferente, mas de forma complementar (ROZENFELD et al., 2006). Há uma vvertente pouco explorada na literatura sobre esse tema que estuda os pontos de contato, ou seja, as atividades que requerem integração para serem realizadas. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste artigo é caracterizar a integração interfuncional em pontos de contato presentes no DP no setor agroindustrial. Foram entrevistados 10 funcionários de duas empresas multinacionais produtoras de sementes que participavam de diversas fases dos processos de DP, sendo que foi possível obter opiniões sobre as características das fases: inicial, intermediária e final. Através da interpretação dos resultados foi possível criar um modelo próprio para explicar as fases do DP, e quais funções atuam em cada uma das fases. Observou-se que dependendo da área que a pessoa trabalha, ela participa somente de determinadas fases, diminuindo seu conhecimento sobre as fases posteriores e vice versa. Não tendo visão multidimensional, que envolve integração interfuncional, as fases do DP e os objetivos das atividades de DP, podem ocorrer conflitos que prejudicam o desenvolvimento como um todo. Isso ocorre, porque muitas vezes dentro de cada fase tem uma equipe formada de diferentes funções integradas, que possuem uma alta integração, porém na passagem de fases, muda-se a equipe e há uma baixa integração, entre as funções da equipe anterior e a equipe subsequente.

  • 25.
    Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Universidade Federal de Viçosa.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Organizações Rurais & Agroindustriais, ISSN 1517-3879, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development (PD) includes many activities that must be performed by professionals from different areas, with a pluralist and complimentary perspective. The existing literature presents an important subject that is poorly explored: the points of contact, that is, activities that require cross-functional integration to be carried out. Thus, the purpose of this study is to characterize the cross-functional integration in the points of contact points of seed development processes, in the agricultural industry. We interviewed 10 employees representing different stages of the PD process, of two multinational seed companies. Based on this it was possible to obtain opinions on the characteristics of the stages: initial, intermediate and final. Through the interpretation of the results, it was possible to create a framework with the following dimensions: cross-functional integration, PD phases, and PD objectives. Depending on the area where the employee works, he/she participated only in a particular phase, decreasing his/her knowledge of the subsequent phases and vice versa. Thus, they do not have a multidimensional view of the PD process, which can be a source of conflicts in the PD process as a whole. There are also cases where, within a given phase, there is a high integration level between functions, however, when the process reaches the next phase, there is a low integration level between the functions of previous and subsequent stages.

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  • 26. Bertan, Franciele Olivo
    et al.
    Ferreira, Ana Cristina
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Análise da Integração Interfuncional nos Pontos de Contato de Processos de Desenvolvimento de Sementes2016In: Organizações Rurais & Agroindustriais, ISSN 1517-3879, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    O desenvolvimento de produtos (DP) abrange muitas atividades que devem ser executadas por profissionais de diferentes áreas, cada uma vendo o produto de uma perspectiva diferente, mas de forma complementar (ROZENFELD et al., 2006). Há uma vertente pouco explorada na literatura sobre esse tema que estuda os pontos de contato, ou seja, as atividades que requerem integração interfuncional para serem realizadas. Dessa forma, o objetivo deste artigo é caracterizar a integração interfuncional em pontos de contato do processo de desenvolvimento de sementes, no setor agroindustrial. Foram entrevistados 10 funcionários de duas empresas multinacionais produtoras de sementes que participavam de diversas fases dos processos de DP, sendo que foi possível obter opiniões sobre as características das fases: inicial, intermediária e final. Por meio da interpretação dos resultados foi possível criar uma estrutura de análise composta pelas seguintes dimensões: integração interfuncional, fases do DP e objetivos das atividades de DP. Observou-se que dependendo da área que o colaborador trabalha, ele participa somente de uma determinada fase, diminuindo seu conhecimento sobre as fases posteriores e vice-versa. Dessa forma, não possuem uma visão multidimensional do processo de DP, o que pode ser a fonte de conflitos que prejudicam o processo de DP como um todo. Há, ainda, casos em que dentro de cada fase há uma equipe formada de diferentes funções que possuem alta integração, porém, quando o processo alcança a fase seguinte, muda-se a equipe e pode haver baixa integração entre as funções da equipe anterior e da equipe subsequente.

  • 27.
    Björhag, Albin
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Skärin, Filip
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Statliga incitaments påverkan på svenska företags reshoringbeslut2018In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Jönköping, 23-24 oktober, 2018, Plan , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Björhag, Albin
    et al.
    Skärin, Filip
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Statliga incitaments påverkan på svenska företags reshoringbeslut2018In: Proceedings of the Plan Research Conference, Jönköping, 23-24 oktober, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system2011In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution has become a key factor in today's logistics system due to companies' desires to achieve considerable economies of scale in production, achieved by focused factories, as well as customers' demands for shorter lead-times and customer adapted products. The purpose of this research is to investigate if the in-transit distribution strategy may offer companies a competitive advantage and may be used as a complement to the centralised distribution strategy and/or the decentralised distribution strategy. This study shows that the in-transit distribution strategy can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally in warehouses. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady and continuous production volumes. In order to be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, good market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the strategy sufficiently. Among these factors, low variation in demand as well as manufacturing output is required, and furthermore distribution lead time needs to be predictable.

  • 30.
    Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system2011In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution has become a key factor in today’s logistics system due to companies’ desires to achieve considerable economies of scale in production, achieved by focused factories, as well as customers’ demands for shorter lead-times and customer adapted products. The purpose of this research is to investigate if the in-transit distribution strategy may offer companies a competitive advantage and may be used as a complement to the centralised distribution strategy and/or the decentralised distribution strategy. This study shows that the in-transit distribution strategy can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally in warehouses. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady and continuous production volumes. In order to be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, good market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the strategy sufficiently. Among these factors, low variation in demand as well as manufacturing output is required, and furthermore distribution lead time needs to be predictable.

  • 31. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    In-transit distribution as a strategy in a global distribution system2011In: International Journal of Shipping and Transport Logistics, ISSN 1756-6517, E-ISSN 1756-6525, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 198-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distribution has become a key factor in today's logistics system due to companies' desires to achieve considerable economies of scale in production, achieved by focused factories, as well as customers' demands for shorter lead-times and customer adapted products. The purpose of this research is to investigate if the in-transit distribution strategy may offer companies a competitive advantage and may be used as a complement to the centralised distribution strategy and/or the decentralised distribution strategy. This study shows that the in-transit distribution strategy can give major competitive advantages by offering rather short lead-times for customers without having to store products locally in warehouses. This, in turn, gives lower warehousing costs, lower tied-up capital, a less interrupted manufacturing, and steady and continuous production volumes. In order to be successful with this strategy, it takes good planning, working closely with customers, good market knowledge, and an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that is able to support the strategy sufficiently. Among these factors, low variation in demand as well as manufacturing output is required, and furthermore distribution lead time needs to be predictable.

  • 32. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Supply Chain Planning in Automotive Sector: A Swedish Case Study2011In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to enhance the current level of knowledge from supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. These are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, which operates in automotive industry with its global manufacturing network. Research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information; these together drive the performance of a supply chain higher. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in the case company quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains several manual phases.

  • 33. Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Supply chain planning in automotive sector: a Swedish case study2011In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to enhance the current level of knowledge from supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. These are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, which operates in automotive industry with its global manufacturing network. Research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information; these together drive the performance of a supply chain higher. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in the case company quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains several manual phases.

  • 34.
    Claesson, Frida
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    Lappeenranta University of Technology.
    Supply Chain Planning in Automotive Sector: Swedish Case Study2011In: Conradi Research Review, ISSN 1459-0980, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to enhance the current level of knowledge from supply chain planning (SCP) by analyzing the importance of collaboration, information exchange and a supporting information system in its successful execution. These are examined through a case study from international manufacturing company, which operates in automotive industry with its global manufacturing network. Research reveals that collaboration is a complex and important issue of SCP, and occurs simultaneously in vertical and horizontal dimensions. It is important to select strategic partners and to develop a structured work processes and routines. The main objective of collaboration is to determine common goals and objectives and to facilitate the exchange of information; these together drive the performance of a supply chain higher. A sufficient information system supporting the SCP is vital to facilitate collaboration, and information exchange between the different supply chain participants. However, currently in the case company quite many phases of SCP are completed without appropriate and integrated information systems and the process itself contains several manual phases.

  • 35. De Freita, M. R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M. L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Demand management in the automotive industry: The role of cross-functional integration2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36. De Freita, M.R.
    et al.
    Pimenta, M.L.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Demand management in the automotive industry: The role of cross-functional integration2017In: Proceedings of the 24th International Annual EurOMA Conference, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37. de Freitas, Marlos Rocha
    et al.
    Lopes Pimenta, Marcio
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Jugend, Daniel
    Oprime, Pedro Carlos
    Demand management: the role of cross-functional integration in a context of political turbulence2020In: Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, ISSN 1355-5855, E-ISSN 1758-4248, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 817-839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how cross-functional integration supports the execution of the demand-side processes and its effects on both the demand and supply-side processes.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A case study was conducted including a Brazilian multinational manufacturer in the automobile industry and some of its suppliers and dealers. 17 interviews were conducted. A theoretical framework is proposed containing five basic elements, they are: characteristics of the demand/supply processes; involved functions; integration factors; context influencers and impacts of integration on demand and supply processes.

    Findings

    The findings present three demand-side processes (Product Launch, Marketing and Sales and Demand Planning) that demonstrated a greater need for cross-functional integration in the studied case, mainly through informal integration factors.

    Research limitations/implications

    The empirical results of this study have methodological limitations due to the use of the case study method. Future research should analyze the effects of other context influencers (e.g. natural catastrophes, civil wars and low level of unemployment) on cross-functional integration.

    Practical implications

    The results highlight that joint planning, willingness to work together, team spirit, adequate communication and cross-functional meetings helped the studied organizations to achieve competitive advantages and improve their performance.

    Originality/value

    This study provides a theoretical framework that helped to improve the understanding of the interrelationships between demand management constructs and cross-functional integration factors. There are indications that a political–economic crisis has stimulated the existence of a willingness to work together and group spirit among employees who remain in the organization after mass dismissals. This climate of cooperation helped to increase the agility and resilience of the studied supply chain, which is currently affected by a changing market.

  • 38.
    de Freitas, Marlos Rocha
    et al.
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil..
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil..
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Previsão de Demanda na Indústria Automobilística. [Demand Forecast in the Automobile Industry]: Papel da Integração Interfuncional. [The Role of Cross-Functional Integration]2017In: Revista ADM.MADE, E-ISSN 2237-5139, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on supply chain management indicates that cross-functional integration (CFI) may be a necessary practice to bring together demand and supply areas, and such an initiative can alleviate conflicts and improve the efficiency of the entire supply chain. However, there is little emphasis on the operational and technical aspects of CFI as a managerial practice and how this can influence demand processes. Thus, the aim of this paper is to analyze how the cross-functional integration contributes to carry out the demand forecasting process. In order to reach this aim, a case study was conducted in a Brazilian subsidiary of a multinational vehicle manufacturer. In total, sixteen in-depth interviews were conducted with managers of vehicle manufacturer and with its suppliers and resellers. As a result, it was identified that joint planning, willingness to work in team and group spirit were the most efficient tools to generate positive impacts in the organization and that factors such as cross-functional meetings and job rotation can present good results to increase the level of integration and improve the accuracy of the demand forecasting. Finally, this work suggests that crossfunctional integration could be used to improve market responsiveness and to obtain better accuracy in forecasting demand.

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  • 39. de Freitas, Marlos Rocha
    et al.
    Pimenta, Márcio Lopes
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Previsão de Demanda na Indústria Automobilística. [Demand Forecast in the Automobile Industry]: Papel da Integração Interfuncional. [The Role of Cross-Functional Integration]2017In: Revista ADM.MADE, E-ISSN 2237-5139, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A literatura sobre supply chain management indica que a integração interfuncional (II) pode ser uma prática necessária para unir as áreas de demanda e de suprimentos, e tal iniciativa pode aliviar conflitos e melhorar a eficiência de toda a cadeia de suprimentos. Entretanto, a literatura apresenta pouca ênfase nos aspectos operacionais e técnicos da II como uma prática gerencial, e como eles podem influenciar os processos de demanda. Desse modo, este artigo objetiva analisar como a II contribui para a realização do processo de previsão da demanda. Para alcançar essa proposta, realizou-se estudo de caso em uma subsidiária brasileira de um fabricante multinacional de veículos. Ao todo, 16 entrevistas em profundidade foram realizadas com gestores da montadora de veículos e com seus fornecedores e revendedores. Como resultados, identificou-se que planejamento conjunto, disposição para trabalho em equipe e espírito de grupo foram as ferramentas mais eficientes para gerar impactos positivos na organização. Também identificou-se que fatores como reuniões interfuncionais e troca de funções podem apresentar bons resultados para melhorar o nível de integração e para aprimorar a acurácia da previsão de demanda. Por fim, este trabalho sugere que a II seja usada para melhorar a responsividade ao mercado, e também para obter maior precisão no cálculo da previsão de demanda.

  • 40.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Design-driven innovation: exploring enablers and barriers2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 721-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation, defined as the innovation of product meanings, in the product-development process. Previous research provides some insights into what enables and hinders design-driven innovation; however a detailed understanding of these factors is missing. Design/methodology/approach – A long-term case study was conducted at a furniture company between 2009 and 2016. Interviews were conducted with respondents within the company, as well as with partners such as retailers and designers. Findings – This paper presents an overview of the identified enablers and barriers. The results demonstrate that enablers and barriers occur in all phases of the product-development process. Second, the connections between enablers and barriers are presented. These are found both within and across different phases, and extend beyond the company’s influence. Research limitations/implications – This study demonstrates how the innovation of product meanings is influenced throughout all phases of the product-development process. Therefore, there is a need to go beyond the mere identification of enablers and barriers. More is gained from generating a thorough understanding of the causes and connections of these factors, including the changes over time. Practical implications – This study demonstrates the need for companies to be able to map what enables and hinders design-driven innovation in their product-development process, where a distinction needs to be made between internal and external factors, to enhance value creation. Originality/value – This study presents a rare long-term case study on design-driven innovation. This study provides new knowledge on the enablers and barriers a company faces while adapting its productdevelopment process to accommodate design-driven innovation.

  • 41. De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, David
    Design-driven innovation: exploring enablers and barriers2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 721-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to explore the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation, defined as the innovation of product meanings, in the product-development process. Previous research provides some insights into what enables and hinders design-driven innovation; however a detailed understanding of these factors is missing. Design/methodology/approach – A long-term case study was conducted at a furniture company between 2009 and 2016. Interviews were conducted with respondents within the company, as well as with partners such as retailers and designers. Findings – This paper presents an overview of the identified enablers and barriers. The results demonstrate that enablers and barriers occur in all phases of the product-development process. Second, the connections between enablers and barriers are presented. These are found both within and across different phases, and extend beyond the company’s influence. Research limitations/implications – This study demonstrates how the innovation of product meanings is influenced throughout all phases of the product-development process. Therefore, there is a need to go beyond the mere identification of enablers and barriers. More is gained from generating a thorough understanding of the causes and connections of these factors, including the changes over time. Practical implications – This study demonstrates the need for companies to be able to map what enables and hinders design-driven innovation in their product-development process, where a distinction needs to be made between internal and external factors, to enhance value creation. Originality/value – This study presents a rare long-term case study on design-driven innovation. This study provides new knowledge on the enablers and barriers a company faces while adapting its productdevelopment process to accommodate design-driven innovation.

  • 42.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden, Materials and Production, IVF.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler. Design-driven innovation focuses on innovating the purpose a product has to a customer. This is a relatively new concept which is not yet thoroughly explored. A case study is conducted to identify the enablers and barriers to this type of innovation. In line with literature, the enablers were identified prior, throughout and after product development, whereas the barriers were only found in later phases. To conclude, this paper will present implications and suggestions for further research on the enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation.

  • 44. De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, David
    Enablers and barriers to design-driven innovation: a case study at a Swedish wood furniture wholesaler2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd International Annual EurOMA Conference, Trondheim, Norway, International Annual EurOMA Conference , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development. Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Product Development - Industrial Design.
    Design-driven innovation: A literature review2016In: Proceedings of the 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Boston, USA, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Design-driven innovation: A literature review2016In: Proceedings of the 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Boston, USA, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Supply Chain and Operations Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, JTH, Industrial design.
    Design-driven innovation: a systematic literature review2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 92-114Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The concept design-driven innovation focuses on innovating product meanings. It has been studied from a variety of perspectives and contexts since the early 2000s. However, a complete overview of the literature published in this area is currently missing. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how design-driven innovation contributes to value creation in product development.

    Design/methodology/approach

    In this systematic literature review, 57 papers and book chapters that cover design-driven innovation were identified and analyzed. An iterative coding process was followed to derive five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation.

    Findings

    Design-driven innovation creates value by focusing on the intangible values of products. The following five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation were identified: development of new product meanings, knowledge generation, actors and collaborations, capabilities and process. These facets and their interrelations are presented in a theoretical framework.

    Practical implications

    The main practical implication of this study is that it is now clear that the five facets of design-driven innovation are interrelated and reinforce each other. Therefore, companies need to approach design-driven innovation from a holistic perspective.

    Originality/value

    This paper contributes to theory by presenting the theoretical framework that provides an overview of available knowledge and that creates a context for future research.

  • 48.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Jönköpings universitet.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköpings universitet.
    Design-driven innovation: a systematic literature review2019In: European Business Review, ISSN 0955-534X, E-ISSN 1758-7107, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 92-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The concept design-driven innovation focuses on innovating product meanings. It has been studied from a variety of perspectives and contexts since the early 2000s. However, a complete overview of the literature published in this area is currently missing. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive understanding of how design-driven innovation contributes to value creation in product development. Design/methodology/approach In this systematic literature review, 57 papers and book chapters that cover design-driven innovation were identified and analyzed. An iterative coding process was followed to derive five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation. Findings Design-driven innovation creates value by focusing on the intangible values of products. The following five facets of design-driven innovation that contribute to value creation were identified: development of new product meanings, knowledge generation, actors and collaborations, capabilities and process. These facets and their interrelations are presented in a theoretical framework. Practical implications The main practical implication of this study is that it is now clear that the five facets of design-driven innovation are interrelated and reinforce each other. Therefore, companies need to approach design-driven innovation from a holistic perspective. Originality/value This paper contributes to theory by presenting the theoretical framework that provides an overview of available knowledge and that creates a context for future research.

  • 49.
    De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Swerea IVF, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Product Development.
    Design-driven innovation: Making meaning for whom2017In: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference: Design for Next, European Academy of Design, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-driven innovation focuses on the innovation of product meanings. This innovation is enabled by integrating knowledge on needs, product language and technological development. So far, it has mostly been studied in contexts where the buyer is the assumed end user. There has been little research about design-driven innovation in other contexts, such as business-to-business and public contexts. Here, companies need to create value for multiple stakeholders. In this study, these are defined as users, buyers and influencers. The aim of this study is to explore how companies consider the different stakeholders in the innovation of product meanings. Two companies participated in a case study. The results demonstrate that both companies mainly focus on addressing needs. However, while one case company prioritizes the perspective from the user, the other focuses more on the buyer. The results illustrate the increased complexity that companies need to manage in design-driven innovation in these contexts.

  • 50. De Goey, Heleen
    et al.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Design-driven innovation: Making meaning for whom2017In: Proceedings of the 12th EAD Conference: Design for Next, European Academy of Design, 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design-driven innovation focuses on the innovation of product meanings. This innovation is enabled by integrating knowledge on needs, product language and technological development. So far, it has mostly been studied in contexts where the buyer is the assumed end user. There has been little research about design-driven innovation in other contexts, such as business-to-business and public contexts. Here, companies need to create value for multiple stakeholders. In this study, these are defined as users, buyers and influencers. The aim of this study is to explore how companies consider the different stakeholders in the innovation of product meanings. Two companies participated in a case study. The results demonstrate that both companies mainly focus on addressing needs. However, while one case company prioritizes the perspective from the user, the other focuses more on the buyer. The results illustrate the increased complexity that companies need to manage in design-driven innovation in these contexts.

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