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  • 1.
    Agostino, Alessandro
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Gerritsen, Bart
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, TU Delft, Netherlands.
    Cloud solution in Business Intelligence for SMEs – vendor and customer perspectives2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 5-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify key success factor for SME customers of cloud based Business Intelligence products. A deep interview was made with four producers and a questionnaire was carried out among 36 SMEs. The findings suggest that the most important CSFs were the level of software functionalities, the ubiquitous access to data, responsive answers to customer support requests, handling large amounts of data and implementation cost. Each of these factors addresses a specific area that customers pay close attention to during the adoption process of a cloud BI solution. Offering ubiquitous access to date and respsonsive answers to customer requests are particularly emphasized for SMEs. We also found that industry tailored software is preferred, monthly or quarterly billings, and contact by email or phone for service. The paper shows recommendations, implications of research and suggests further research on the topic.

  • 2.
    Amara, Yasmina
    et al.
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Management, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Inst Technol, Dept Management, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Jenster, Per
    Nijmegen School of Management, Netherlands.
    Vriens, Dirk
    Nijmegen School of Management, Netherlands.
    Evaluating Business Intelligence Software: Testing the SSAV Model2009In: ECIS 2009: Third European Competitive Intelligence Symposium / [ed] Hoppe, M, Solberg-Soilen, K, Hamrefors, S, Västerås/Eskilstuna: Mälardalens Universitet , 2009, p. 238-251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Choosing the right Business Intelligence (BI) software is critical to increasing productivity and effectiveness in organizations today. At the same time it is a very elaborating and complex process to choose the right software due to the fact that a large number of BI products exist on the market, which are quite different and updated frequently. The objective of this study is to develop and test a model for the evaluation of BI Software. The findings of the study revealed that it is difficult to declare what is the most competitive BI software as what is good for one user might not be good for another depending on their different business needs. Having said that the study initiated a new classification of BI Software vendors depending on the degree to which they comply with the functions in the Competitive Intelligence (CI) cycle. The software tested was divided into five categories: Fully complete, Complete, Semi Complete, Incomplete and Insubstantial. We conclude that the SSAV (Solberg Soilen, Amara, Vriens) Model Together with some proposed non technological variables and a classification developed can be used as a user's selection tool for deciding which BI Software to purchase.

  • 3. Amara, Yasmina
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Vriens, Dirk
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Using the SSAV model to evaluate Business Intelligence Software2012In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Choosing the right Business Intelligence (BI) software is critical to increasing productivity and effectiveness in organizations today. At the same time it is a very elaborating and complex process to choose the right software due to the fact that a large number of BI products exist on the market, which are quite different and updated frequently. The objective of this study is to develop and test a model for the evaluation of BI Software. The findings of the study revealed that it is difficult to declare what is the most competitive BI software as what is good for one user might not be good for another depending on their different business needs. Having said that the study initiated a new classification of BI Software vendors depending on the degree to which they comply with the functions in the Competitive Intelligence (CI) cycle. The software tested was divided into five categories: Fully complete, Complete, Semi Complete, Incomplete and Insubstantial. We conclude that the SSAV (Solberg Søilen, Amara, Vriens) Model Together with some proposed non technological variables and a classification developed can be used as a user's selection tool for deciding which BI Software to purchase.

  • 4.
    Aziza, Amine
    et al.
    Institut national des postes et télécommunications (INPT), Rabat, Morocco.
    Oubrich, Mourad
    Madinat Al Irfane Rabat - Institutes - Morocco, Rabat, Morocco.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    The impact of CRM on QoE: An exploratory study from mobile phone industry in Morocco2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 22-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s mobile phone sector is marked by intensified competition and strong market penetration. In this environment, the carriers offer their customers a wide variety of services that are quite similar from one operator to another. These customers are always searching for a quality of experience (QoE). On one hand, operators interact with their customers through CRM practices inspired by their marketing strategies and rolled out through their procedures and technological support. On the other hand, the customers expect an extremely high quality of service (QoS) and subjectively perceive the utility and usability (Qp) of these mobile services. This paradox led us to study the impact of CRM on the customer experience (QoE) in the mobile phone industry, in this study with data from Morocco. Empirical data confirms existing theory, CRM determinants for QoE include quality of service, quality of interaction with customer, claims management and customer knowledge. However, we also found that practitioners are aware that organizations should look beyond the relationship to manage the customer experience. To this end we developed a model based on the first four CRM determinants and the findings in this study.

  • 5.
    Drozdz, Sebastian
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Dufwa, Marcus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Meconnen, Robiel
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    An Assessment of Customer Shared Value in the Restaurant Industry – a Survey from Sweden2015In: Theoretical and Applied Economics, ISSN 1841-8678, E-ISSN 1844-0029, Vol. 22, no 4 (605), p. 85-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article tries to investigate to which extent the concept of Customer Shared Value (CSV) is relevant for a particular industry, the restaurant industry. We wanted to know if there is a correlation between social benefits and economic benefits for restaurants. We also wanted to know if restaurants already conduct their business according to the concept of Creating Shared Value, but maybe without reference to the concept as such. We found that restaurant companies in Sweden actually work to create economic benefits and social values. However we did not find that there was any clear pattern between economic value and social values. The companies with the highest total shared value are in fact the companies with the highest revenue, but there are also companies with lower revenue which have scored high in total shared value and vice versa. Most of the restaurants implicitly work with several factors of the concept such as having knowledge of the costs and causes of environmental impacts and the notion of how to treat employees fairly. The findings are valuable because they show to what extent CSV is a reality in the restaurant business today. This may have implications about how practitioner and scholars alike view the concept of CSV.

  • 6.
    Fri, William
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET).
    Pehrsson, Tobias
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    How Phases of Cluster Development are Associated with Innovation: the Case of China2013In: International Journal of Innovation Science, ISSN 1757-2223, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 31-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both Volvo and SAAB are now Chinese owned car companies. This means that a substantial amount of Swedish innovation takes place in China. In order to understand this phenomenon better and what it means to innovation strategy we look at how industrial clusters in the automobile industry in different phases of development differ. The Diamond Model is used to explain and measure the competitive situation in three cluster regions in China. The new automobile manufacturing clusters of Chongqing and Chengdu (2C) is compared with two well-developed clusters in Shanghai and Jiangsu, and Beijing and Hebei. Although Shanghai is the most attractive automobile cluster, automobile manufacturing firms choose to locate their production in other regions. The move is also related to the level of innovation in different regions.

  • 7.
    Gedda, David
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Nilsson, Billy
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Såthén, Zebastian
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Crowdfunding: Finding the Optimal Platform for Funders and Entrepreneurs2016In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a steadily expanding source of venture capital, crowdfunding has become an alternative to traditional funding sources, such as banks and financial investors. The phenomenon of crowdfunding is represented by a growing number of Internet sites, here called crowdfunding platforms, devoted to the service. In this article, we investigate crowdfunding and their payout models, which are standard components on crowdfunding platforms. We consider the perspectives of both entrepreneurs and funders to determine the most attractive combination of models found on crowdfunding platforms. Our findings indicate that the most popular crowdfunding platforms, at the time of this study, reflect the preferences of entrepreneurs. The funders’ favoured crowdfunding model, which we call the equity model, is not currently found, in combination with the often-grouped, non-financial crowdfunding models of pre-order, sponsoring, or reward, on any of the top platforms. Thus, the research identifies a new market for crowdfunding platforms.

  • 8.
    Gerritsen, Bart H. M.
    et al.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    de Visser, Pieter Bas
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Hoogreef, Philip J. M.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Hulst, Kimberly
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Janssen, Marloes L.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Horselenberg, Loes
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Van Dijk, Rens R.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Consenheim, Ernst
    Jos de Vries Company, Maarssen, The Netherlands.
    Social Media Coming to the Mall: A Cross-Channel Response2014In: Product Development in the Socio-sphere: Game Changing Paradigms for 21st Century Breakthrough Product Development and Innovation / [ed] Dirk Schaefer, Heidelberg: Springer Publishing Company, 2014, Vol. 9783319074047, p. 169-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional shopping malls experience the effects of expanding online shopping. In addition, social media grew as a platform for customer orientation and expression. In-mall retail must respond. We take the customer journey as the guiding model for customer experience building and focus on converting cross-channel built customer expectation into enriched customer experiences in in-mall stores. We focus on the in-mall part of the journey but recognize the need to engage with customers in other parts of the journey and on social media. That is where the word-of-mouth spreads nowadays. We develop a ’u-retail’ process model and a cyber-physical system concept for a mall: we combine a mall website, mobile apps and interactive storefronts containing Facebook processes into an integrating system. Customers can manipulate info and processes displayed on the interactive storefront through touch or mobile devices. The Facebook shopping-with-online-friends process inserts real-time feedback from social media friends in the storefront window. We show how ’gamification’ and trust and loyalty breeding can be employed. Mall and retailers attract customers in a collective manner, from parking services to package deals. Cross-channel customer tracking is part of the concept, providing a view on both online and offline communities. Ubiquitous tracking of customers foster deep customer relation and experience of data. We implemented a first partly surrogate prototype to validate the concept. This partly empirical, partly designed experimental implementation can itself be a big data tool for scientists and retailers to acquire deeper insights. The concept can be generalized to other social contexts. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014. All rights reserved

  • 9.
    Gerritsen, Bart H. M.
    et al.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Pieter-Bas, de Visser
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Hoogreef, Philip J. M.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Hulst, Kimberly
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Janssen, Marloes L.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Horselenberg, Loes
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Van Dijk, Rens R.
    Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Consenheim, Ernst
    Jos de Vries Company, Maarssen, The Netherlands.
    Social Media Coming to the Mall: A Cross-Channel Response2014In: Product Development in the Socio-sphere: Game Changing Paradigms for 21st Century Breakthrough Product Development and Innovation / [ed] Dirk Schaefer, Cham: Springer, 2014, 1, p. 169-235Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional shopping malls experience the effects of expanding online shopping. In addition, social media grew as a platform for customer orientation and expression. In-mall retail must respond. We take the customer journey as the guiding model for customer experience building and focus on converting cross-channel built customer expectation into enriched customer experiences in in-mall stores. We focus on the in-mall part of the journey but recognize the need to engage with customers in other parts of the journey and on social media. That is where the word-of-mouth spreads nowadays. We develop a ‘u-retail’ process model and a cyber-physical system concept for a mall: we combine a mall website, mobile apps and interactive storefronts containing Facebook processes into an integrating system. Customers can manipulate info and processes displayed on the interactive storefront through touch or mobile devices. The Facebook shopping-with-online-friends process inserts real-time feedback from social media friends in the storefront window. We show how ‘gamification’ and trust and loyalty breeding can be employed. Mall and retailers attract customers in a collective manner, from parking services to package deals. Cross-channel customer tracking is part of the concept, providing a view on both online and offline communities. Ubiquitous tracking of customers foster deep customer relation and experience of data. We implemented a first partly surrogate prototype to validate the concept. This partly empirical, partly designed experimental implementation can itself be a big data tool for scientists and retailers to acquire deeper insights. The concept can be generalized to other social contexts.

  • 10.
    Granquist, Christoffer
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Strömberg, Filip
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Games as a Marketing Channel – The Impact of Players and Spectators2015In: International Journal of Electronic Business Management, ISSN 1728-2047, E-ISSN 2077-1061, Vol. 13, p. 57-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study examines how advertising in video games are received by players and spectators. To test how the design of the advertisement affects the player/spectator, respondents were exposed to different types of advertising. The results showed no significant differences between players and spectators, however, the brands with high relevance to the game resulted in a higher ad recognition. It was also found that passive advertising has the greatest effect on the spectator and the active advertising yielded higher ad recognition of the player.

    The results of the study give researchers and marketers insight into important consequences, as well as comparative data for future research to explore consumer perceptions of brands in a virtual environment. The study also presents the potential of video games as a marketing and communication tool.

  • 11.
    Hansson, Linnea
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Wrangmo, Anton
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Optimal ways for companies to use Facebook as a marketing channel2013In: Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, ISSN 1477-996X, E-ISSN 1758-8871, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 112-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Social media has increased as a marketing channel, and Facebook is the biggest social media company globally. Facebook contains both positive and negative information about companies; therefore, it is important for companies to manage their Facebook page to best serve their own interests. Although most users are familiar with business and marketing activities on Facebook, they use it primarily for fun and personal purposes. The most effective methods for companies to use Facebook have not been clear. The personal nature of Facebook presents unique challenges for companies by raising ethical and social responsibility issues that are important to users. The purpose of this paper is to discover how companies can optimize their use of Facebook as a marketing channel. Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted. The respondents were 158 users of Facebook in Sweden; complete answers were provided by all respondents. In a series of specific questions and comments, the respondents were asked to describe an optimal marketing solution on Facebook for companies. They rated different functions, which were illustrated with pictures, to help in the cognitive process and to avoid misunderstandings. Findings – Most users who have an opinion on the issue accept marketing on Facebook, but only in the right amount. There are basically two groups: those who think that companies have no place on Facebook and those who want companies to be active on Facebook. The latter group emphasizes the importance of meaningful posts without unsolicited sales messages, and would prefer to search for the companies themselves rather than being bombarded by company messages. By far, status updates and pictures/images were found to be the most important functions to respondents. Research limitations/implications – The sample consisted of only Swedish users. Another limitation was that, since many Facebook users do not normally think about the implications of being exposed to marketing on Facebook, they have difficulty taking a position on many issues related to the service.Practical implications – The results give companies a clear idea of how to effectively use Facebook in their marketing efforts. Originality/value – A large number of companies are currently asking themselves, “How can we use Facebook in an optimal way?” The results in this study answer this question and lead directly to saving time and resources for these companies. 

  • 12. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    MSA Sordin AB: Case ID 0032004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    MSA Sordin – ett medelstort svenskt företag som producerar hörselskydd för yrkesmän – har växt kontinuerligt sedan starten 1989. Eftersom företaget huvudsakligen tillverkar s.k. ”passivt” skyddande hörselskydd, har man under 1990-talet främst inriktat sig på elektroniskt hörselskydd. Idag erbjuder man ett stort urval av elektroniska produkter. Det senaste steget i denna utveckling var att kombinera hörselskydd med s.k. ”blue tooth” – en teknik som gör det möjligt för användaren att använda mobiltelefon även i en mycket bullrig miljö. MSA Sordin AB anses vara ett av de ledande företagen inom utveckling av hörselskydd. Denna framstående position på den globala marknaden är dock relativt ny för företaget. När lönsamheten var något låg i början av detta decennium beslöt ledningen för MSA Sordin att kontinuerligt höja kompetensen hos personalen genom att anlita konsultföretaget teknIQ. Samarbetet mellan de båda organisationerna har visat sig mycket framgångsrikt – i synnerhet införandet av ”blue tooth”-teknologin hos MSA Sordin AB har varit ett viktigt resultat. Idag är kontinuerlig fortbildning för personalen en självklarhet inom företaget.

  • 13. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nipsoft AB2004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A large part of graduate engineers are hired directly by corpora- tions when they graduate from university. They typically spend most of their working life being employed. Only a few take the step into entrepreneurship and start their own business. One reason of this may be that university edu- cated engineers are not properly trained to run a business of their own. Many emphasize their short term personal economic situation even though they have developed a competitive business idea while in school.The founder and owner of recently started IT-firm Nipsoft AB, lo- cated in Sollefteå/Northern Sweden, tells the story of an exceptional career: Being an academically trained technician, he thought he might have to wait a long time before leading a corporation of his own. Under rather coinciden- tal circumstances he was able to start his own business at the age of 29. Af- ter a short time of struggle, he now leads his data system developing com- pany successfully. He believes that much of his achievements is due to the short economic education which he received in an independent organization. For students to start to think about the possibility of starting up companies they need to be taught how.

  • 14. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Nymek AB: Case ID-0112004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical component producing company Nymek AB, based in Skellefteå/North Sweden, has undergone an extensive staff training program during the last years. The goal has been to engage the personnel in the production process and to create a higher team and development spirit. Constant improvements of the employee’s skills are considered necessary in order for the corporation to survive in today’s harsh global competitive situation. But, unlike most other companies, it’s strategy has not been to grow, but to survive, and maintain status quo. Within the program, the entire staff meet once every half year to discuss strategies. Furthermore, the workers are organized in groups whose leaders meet once every second week in order to debate goals and to document achievements. The program has been a costly investment for the company. One of the most difficult changes was the alternation of the staff’s attitude. Having been part of a concern listed on the stock exchange, the employees had to realize that Nymek AB today is no more than a local firm with a restricted clientele and that the company’s owners want it to stay like that.

  • 15. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Rock City AB - Musiclink AB: Case ID 0042004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sedan musikfestivalens etablering har ett musikindustri- och utbildningscentrum börjat växa fram i Hultsfred. Karaktäristiskt är att näringsidkare möter konsertarrangörer och studenter inom media kommer i kontakt med webbutvecklare. Samarbetsprojektet mellan de olika företagen, institutionerna och föreningarna i Hultsfred har även fått stöd från olika offentliga och privata bidragsgivare, som t.ex. KK-stiftelsen, Hultsfreds kommun och Regionförbundet. Projektet har fått namnet ”Rock City” (eller ”Kreativa mötesplatsen för musik- och upplevelseindustrin Hultsfred”) och anses som okonventionellt och innovativt i sitt arbetssätt, men dock mycket framgångsrikt. Ett av företagen som på grund av sina ägarförhållanden knutits till den ”kreativa mötesplatsen” i Hultsfred är Musiclink, ett teknik- och webbföretag som erbjuder framför allt internetlösningar och undervisning inom medierelaterade ämnen. Företaget förfogar över hög expertkompetens och har börjat etablera sig som en viktig aktör i branschen.

  • 16. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Röngårds Åkeri AB: Case ID-0122004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transport corporation Röngårds Åkeri AB, located in Älvdalen/North Sweden, faced an enormous amount of paper work when they took full responsibility for the transportation of all garbage for the commune Älvdalen. The company’s task is to take care of both industrial and private waste. As it turned out, up to 75 % of the work time was spent filling out forms and sending them to the secretary at the main station which in turn had to process the information to write correct bills. In order to make the business more efficient, its CEO created a new system: Nowadays, the drivers use a palm computer that scans in all necessary information at every place where they have to collect garbage. The information is then treated electronically and a bill can be sent to the clients already the next day. The technical innovation at Röngårds Åkeri AB rellying on modern information technology has not only saved the company a lot of work, time and money but has also changed the firm’s structure and they eaw they work.

  • 17. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Svenska Magnet Fabriken AB: Case ID 0052004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenska Magnet Fabriken AB i Hallstahammar är ett av Sveriges ledande företag inom produktion och utveckling av magnetprodukter. Sedan starten 1992 har företaget främst fungerat som underleverantör, men idag befinner sig företaget i en omdaningsprocess. Katalysator i denna utveckling har varit ett utbildningsprogram inom elektroteknik som genomfördes i samarbete med kompetensnätverket TekniQ. Under utbildningens gång föddes tankar på utveckling av en unik lyftapparat som senare omsattes i verklighet. Lyftapparaten (”Multilyft”) framställdes tillsammans med några av Mälardalens högskolas designstudenter och presenterades nyligen på den Tekniska Mässan. Produktens framgång har varit stor: Förutom att ha vunnit det ”Stora Embeddedpriset” har Svenska Magnet Fabriken AB redan kunnat märka av en stor efterfrågan på produkten. Ledningen funderar nu på att förverkliga flera av sina produktidéer. Detta innebär dock till viss del en omstrukturering från ett leverantör- till ett kunskapsföretag och ställer andra krav på företaget.

  • 18. Huber, Stefan
    et al.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management.
    Zetterbergs AB: Case ID 0022004Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Zetterbergs AB – ett företag med lång erfarenhet av lastbilsflaksproduktion för transportbranschen – anses vara den största tillverkaren på den svenska marknaden. Företaget har växt kontinuerligt under de senaste 50 åren. Idag finns tre produktionsfabriker i Sverige, samt en i Polen. Zetterbergs AB är en del i den internationella koncernen Hiab, som är marknadsledande inom lastningslösningar. Zetterbergs AB:s kunder är inte bara svenska, utan man har även en omfattande export, främst till andra europeiska länder. År 2003 kontaktades Zetterbergs AB av kompetensnätverket proDesign efter att ha rekommenderats av Volvo Scania AB som en passande verksamhet för ett utvecklingsprogram. Detta program omfattar två inriktningar: design och elektronik. Även om deltagarna från Zetterbergs AB insåg behovet av fortbildning har projektet dock inte bidragit nämnvärt till förändringar inom företaget. En produktutvecklare uppger att förståelsen för att investeringar i ny teknologi inte är möjlig för företaget varit den viktigaste insikten. Man kommer nu istället att inrikta sig på traditionella tillverkningsmetoder, dvs. mekanisk produktion. Elektroniska detaljer kommer man att köpa in från underleverantörer.

  • 19.
    Jenster, Per
    et al.
    Nordic International Management Institute (NIMI), China.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    The Relationship between Strategic Planning and Company Performance – A Chinese perspective2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the relationship between Strategic Planning and Company Performances in Chinese companies? Is there a correlation between Company Performance and the Strategies adopted by these companies, using the Miles and Snow model for Aggressiveness Strategies? And is it possible to say something more about what kind of Strategic Planning gives better Company Performances? We wanted to separate here between the Planning which is related to what is called Competitive Intelligence and other activities related to Planning. The Idea was to be able to say something about the importance of Competitive Intelligence. We also wanted to use more extensive statistical analysis with more variables in light of the criticisms that has been raised about the methodology of previous studies. We found that better planning had a positive effect on a number of key business performance measures. We found that there was indeed a distinction between the different strategies selected and Company Performance. The strategy type named Reactors performed systematically less well than companies who choose one of the other strategies. Moreover we found that there were differences between different planning activities and Company Performance and that activities related to Competitive Intelligence were on the average more important for Company Performance than other Planning activities.

  • 20.
    Jenster, Per V.
    et al.
    China Europe International Business School, Shanghai, P. R. China.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Ronneby, Sweden.
    Business marketing intelligence: Analysis and tools2005In: Managing business marketing & sales: An international perspective / [ed] Per V. Jenster, H. Michael Hayes & David E. Smith, Frederiksberg: Copenhagen Business School Press, 2005, p. 77-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Jenster, Per V.
    et al.
    China Europe International Business School, Shanghai, P. R. China.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Market intelligence: building strategic insight2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors provide an overview of the most important tools and concepts relevant to intelligence analysis for strategic decision making. The book discusses a number of tools and concepts useful to build strategic insights. Their focus is not only on competitors, but also on customers, suppliers and a range of other stakeholders. "Market Intelligence" provides managers with helpful concepts, tools and ideas on market intelligence and analysis. Additionally, it gives the reader some of the analytical tools used to analyze both micro and macro factors in the organization's environment to better predict future outcomes and help decision making. The field of competitive intelligence is studied by a diverse research community. Contributions are made to aid states on a national, regional and local level (Public Intelligence), the military (Military Intelligence), non-profit organizations (NPO Intelligence) and private companies (Private Intelligence). However, these contributions are mostly done in isolation, even though all these fields of study have much in common.The authors build their insight on these various schools as well as practical applications and provide the essential insights to aid management thinking.

  • 22.
    Lashgari, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sutton-Brady, C.
    Business School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Ulfvengren, P.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adoption strategies of social media in B2B firms: a multiple case study approach2018In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 730-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to clarify business-to-business (B2B) firms’ strategies of social media marketing communication. The study aims to explore the factors contributing to the formation and adoption of integration strategies and identify who the B2B firms target. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple case study approach is used to compare four multinational corporations and their practices. Face-to-face interviews with key managers, and extensive readings and observations of the firms’ websites and social media platforms have been conducted. Findings: The study results in a model, illustrating different processes of selection, adoption and integration involved in the development of social media communication strategy for B2B firms. Major factors involved in determining the platform type, and strategies used within different phases and processes are identified. Research limitations/implications: As the chosen methodology may limit generalizability, further research is encouraged to test the model within a B2B context especially within small and medium enterprises as only large multinational corporations were investigated in this study. Practical implications: The paper provides insight into how B2B marketers can align social media with their firms’ goals through the strategic selection of platforms to reach the targeted audience and communicate their message. Originality/value: The study uncovers the benefits gained by B2B firms’ through interaction with individuals on social media. This is a significant contribution as the value of such interaction was previously undefined and acted as a barrier for adopting social media in some B2B firms. © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited.

  • 23. Nerme, Philip
    et al.
    Stenström, Christoffer
    Darefelt, Niklas
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Usage of internet banking among different segments as an example of innovation: trust and information needs2013In: Journal of Internet Banking and Commerce, ISSN 1204-5357, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 2-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The usage of internet has had what can only be descried as an enormous growth in the last decade. This has also resulted in an increased risk in the usage of Internet, in particular for an area as internet banking. This paper examines the confidence among different segments of e-banking users or customers. It explains why results differ. Data were collected with a questionnaire with a sample of 50 fully completed answered. The results show that trust in internet banking usage differs among segments and also that the perceived lack of information tends to differ among segments. Moreover we found that the most valuable segmentation can be divided into three groups, between 18-25, above 66, and the rest. The findings have significance for both security and marketing of internet banking services.

  • 24. Nyblom, Mattias
    et al.
    Behrami, Jenny
    Nikkilä, Tung
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    An evaluation of business intelligence software systems in SMEs - a case study2012In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a simple model for evaluating the performance of Business Intelligence software systems based on what companies themselves find to be most important; efficiency, user friendliness, overall satisfaction, price and adaptability. Companies want to know the different systems used, why they are used and how effective they are for different tasks. They are also concerned about the systems' compatibilities. The study builds on a deep interview with eight Swedish SMEs. The results show what terms are used by users, how they have solved their information needs and what problems arise in each company. It also shows that the decisions about what system to use are related to the experience specific individuals have had in other companies.

  • 25.
    Sabanovic, Adis
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Customers’ Expectations and Needs in the Business Intelligence Software Market2012In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 5-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to find out what companies desire when choosing a Business Intelligence (BI) system. We look at what their needs are and what they expect and understand from this software system, which can make them work more efficient and gain better knowledge about the business they are in. A web questionnaire was used for 67 Swedish companies from various industries. The results are summarized and analyzed in cross tables for comparison. A model called The PET-model of BI implementation was created as a result of the theoretical findings. The model is used to finalize the results and the conclusions of the paper. The paper provides an argument for and an analysis of what is expected from a valuable BI Software Solution. It provides relevant facts about companies’ BI usage habits, which again is a guideline for BI software product development.

  • 26.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    A place for intelligence studies as a scientific discipline2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the field of Competitive Intelligence (CI) or Intelligence Studies (IS) a proper scientific field of study? The empirical investigation found that academics and professionals within CI and IS could not agree upon what dimensions, topics or content are handled by their own area of interest that is not covered by other areas of study. In fact, most topics listed as special for CI and IS are covered by other established scientific journals. Most topics are covered by other disciplines. The data also showed that the same group could not list any analysis that is not used by other areas of study. It shows that a majority of the analyses the respondents think are unique to their study come from the area of strategy and military intelligence. However, this does not mean that CI and IS do not have their own place or niche as a study and discipline. It is suggested here, but further investigation is encouraged, that CI and IS bring a number of unique dimensions to the social sciences.

  • 27.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    A research agenda for intelligence studies in business2016In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research paper defines the scope for a research agenda for competitive intelligence (CI), market intelligence and more generally for intelligence studies in business. Respondents in the survey defined the scope to include analysis, traditional phenomena or problems, new phenomena, trans-or cross disciplinary studies, methodological issue and industry specific studies. Respondents were also asked to come up with terms for a good definition of the study. We found that existing definitions of CI in use are overlapping with definitions of other more established fields of study, like decision sciences and marketing intelligence. Respondents agreed that it's practical to define the study in terms of understanding the external environment. In the discussion a parallel is made to the notion of surrounding world analysis and Stevan Dedijer's ideas about social intelligence. A broad discussion leads to a renewed interest for disciplines studied by the humanities as we show what has been lost in the development of the social sciences. Implications are shown and future studies suggested.

  • 28.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    A survey of users’ perspectives and preferences as to the value of JISIB - a spot-check2014In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business (JISIB) has performed a survey, or done a spot-check, to learn more about its users at the end of three years of publications. Users were found via the journal’s site on LinkedIn and a web-survey was sent from there as an announcement. 18 respondents answered completely. This was only 3,2% of the total member group, but we still think we can draw a number of conclusion from it, also as compared to feedback gathered during the years. Users are looking for more case study material in the articles. There is an even balance between those who think there is too much technical material and too little. The discussion about what languages to publish articles in is likely to continue. It is not given that this should be exclusively English in the future. At the same time publishing non-English articles present a number of challenges.

  • 29.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    An overview of articles on Competitive Intelligence in JCIM and CIR2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 44-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an overview of fifty-one articles from the Journal of Competitive Intelligence and Management (JCIM) posted on the Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals´ webpage. It also looks at sixty-tree randomly selected articles out of about 250 from the Competitive Intelligence Review (CIR), published between 1996 and 2001. The first analysis is based on a comparison with eleven different variables that have been picked out from each of the articles. Findings: The most common country where the authors’ come from is the United States of America. Sixty-one of the eighty-three authors have a higher degree, first of all MBA and/or Ph.D. North American authors have a higher degree than authors from Europe. Authors from North America have contributed with fifty-seven percent of the proposals for further research of a total of twenty-one proposals. Fourteen articles have a professional author. The rest are academic contributions. The main topic in these articles is how to develop Competitive Intelligence (CI) but also how to define CI. The articles have different methodological approaches, qualitative and quantitative. Seventy tree percent have a qualitative approach and of those there are thirty-seven percent that also have a qualitative approach. For the second analysis dedicated to CIR one clear conclusion points to the large number of articles which resulted from the introduction of the Economic Espionage Act of 1997. Most contributions at CIR come from practitioners.

  • 30.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management, Karlskrona.
    Boosting Innovation and Knowledge through Delocalization: Market Intelligence at Trade Shows2010In: Problems & Perspectives in Management, ISSN 1727-7051, E-ISSN 1810-5467, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 200-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trade shows have consistently been neglected in marketing research, especially the gathering of market information, what is studied under Market Intelligence and directly related to a company’s Knowledge and Innovation. A major reason is that the marketing discipline traditionally has had a strong focus on customers instead of competitors and influencers. In this article we show how the field of Competitive Intelligence is a useful part of the company’s Integrated Marketing Communications. Based on a qualitative method encompassing a case study and exploratory research we followed, coached and traveled with two different groups of companies to major International Trade shows. Based on the information gathered a division into three areas of Intelligence was useful. These were intelligence about products, the booths and the behavior in the booths. For each group a number of Key Intelligence Topics and a set of specific research methods were identified which can make the Market Intelligence process more efficient. We explain why Exhibits or trade shows have much in common with Event Marketing and could be considered a part of the latter.

  • 31.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Business intelligence, big data and theory2017In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Chengdu-Chongqing as a major battlefield of global industrial competition in the first half of the 21st century  – A Geoeconomic analysis2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of industry and business reports written on China is considerable, but most fail to separate between contributions made by different economic regions and cities. Thus they miss the economic importance and significance of the great push westwards. This can be compared to an analysis which treats Europe as one country, where few distinctions are made between Germany and Bulgaria. For example, the Global Innovation Index 2011 mentions China 261 times, without mentioning Chengdu or Chongqing (2C) once. Still 2C have had the highest economic growth of any city in the world during the past 5 years (2004-09). This article shows that despite the fact that 2C has now become a major global industrial center it attracts relatively few foreign companies and employees. Two industries, the car industry and the IT industry, are used to illustrate the importance of direct presence in this region for the competitive advantage of a series of industries.

  • 33.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management, Karlskrona.
    Competitive Intelligence at Trade Shows2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trade shows have consistently been neglected in marketing research, especially the gathering of market information, what is studied under Market Intelligence and directly related to a company’s Knowledge and Innovation. A major reason is that the marketing discipline traditionally has had a strong focus on customers instead of competitors and influencers. In this article we show how the field of Competitive Intelligence is a useful part of the company’s Integrated Marketing Communications. Based on a qualitative method encompassing a case study and exploratory research we followed, coached and traveled with two different groups of companies to major International Trade shows. Based on the information gathered a division into three areas of Intelligence was useful. These were intelligence about products, the booths and the behavior in the booths. For each group a number of Key Intelligence Topics and a set of specific research methods were identified which can make the Market Intelligence process more efficient. We explain why Exhibits or trade shows have much in common with Event Marketing and could be considered a part of the latter.

  • 34.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Economic and industrial espionage at the start of the 21st century – Status quaestionis2016In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a literature review where the aim is to define a status quaestionisfor the field of economic and industrial espionage. History shows how those who engage in theseactivities often are the scientifically and industrially weaker party, the party that is learning ortrying to catch up. On a global scale economic and industrial espionage can be seen as a form ofinvoluntarily sharing that has a series of positive results for economic development. On thescale of the individual businesses attacked, and for tax authorities in those countries, it is atroublesome phenomenon that must be regulated and punished. Governments must preparesociety for systematic and frequent cyberattacks. Private companies are wise to move to strictersecurity controls, which must include encryption. A number of specific research projects aresuggested throughout the article. In the literature we have identified the following agentmotives: the employee who needs money, has split loyalties, leaves angry, the occasional thieveand the professional spy.

  • 35.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 1, No 1 (2011)2011In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 2, No 1 (2012)2012In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 2, No 2 (2012)2012In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 3, No 1 (2013)2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    JISIB has entered into an electronic licensing relationship with EBSCO Publishing. It has also been selected to appear in EBSCO’s Business Source Complete database, which according to the company publishes "Superior Academic Journals (…) with premium content of peer-reviewed, business related journals." JISIB now also fulfills the official criteria of Thomson Reuters to be cited in their ISI Web of Knowledge database. As such it has applied to be included in the database. However, by experience with other journals, we know this process can still take considerable time. After having had the journal’s first annual meeting for editors in December we would like to thank the old board members who are leaving and welcome the new ones.

  • 39.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 3, No 2 (2013)2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sixth issue of JISIB marks the journal’s second anniversary. Again we are delighted to welcome contributions by academics from so many different countries, with so many different backgrounds. The academic contributions of our female authors continue to show also in this issue.

    If this issue should have one common theme it would be related to Brazil. It is not a special issue on Brazil, but we saw the possibility to include three articles which relates to the experience of competitive intelligence in this country. However, the first article by Sheila Wright, Christophe Bisson, and Alistair Duffy entitled “Competitive Intelligence and Information Technology Adoption of SMEs in Turkey: Diagnosing Current Performance and Identifying Barriers“ is on another topic and deals with SMEs need to improve intelligence-based output to decision-makers. Based on empirical findings the aim has been to identify and classify CI behaviour and attitudes of SMEs in Turkey. 

  • 40.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 3, No 3 (2013)2013In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The journal continues to draw mainly on articles presented at academic conferences on topics related to competitive intelligence. In 2013 SCIP organized a first conference in South Africa, under the leadership of ASA du Toit, the journal’s editor for Africa.

    The first article by Agostino et al. entitled “Cloud solution in Business Intelligence for SMEs –vendor and customer perspectives“ identifies key success factor for SMEs of cloud based Business Intelligence products. Most important KSFs identified in this study were the level of software functionalities, the ubiquitous access to data, responsive answers to customer support requests, handling large amounts of data and implementation cost. The study also shows that SMEs prefer industry tailored software, monthly or quarterly billings, and contact by email or phone for service.

  • 41.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 4, No 1 (2014)2014In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On May 3rd 2014 JISIB received an email saying it has been accepted to be indexed by SCOPUS Elsevier. Thus a vital goal for the journal has been achieved. The SCOPUS acceptance will automatically allow us to enter a number of other indexes used by different nations for their individual rankings, which we again expect will increase the number and quality of submissions. The next goal of the journal is to be accepted to Reuter’s ISI Web of Knowledge. Experience with other journals however show that this may take some time, also after official criteria are fulfilled as ISI are looking at the number of times the applicant has been cited by their existing journals. There is no reliable way to keep track of this figure from our side as Reuter’s do not say how many citations are required. Instead we will file and application during the year and keep at it with regular intervals. Open Source journals are highly appreciated by users and we are convinced that they are here to stay.

    In this issue of JISIB we have admitted a large number of opinion pieces. Opinion pieces are important to allow for a broader perspective of the field in terms of policies, adaptions of CI in foreign countries and general interest in the form of debates. It also shows the normative qualities that are present in any social science discipline.

  • 42.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 4, No 2 (2014)2014In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 4-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like in the previous issue we have admitted a large number of opinion pieces, first of all in the form of case studies but also reviews and a survey. It is quite fitting that we present two articles with cases as case studies have been requested in a recent surveys from users of the journal.

    The first article by Christophe Bisson shows CI practices at a French regional chamber of agricultura with four departemental chambers of agricultura linked to it. A survey was used to detect seven typological strands (gathering, attitude, Technology support, IT systems, Use, Location and Identification). The paper finds that current practices are ineffective, inefficient and far from attaining goals for collective intelligence gathering.

    The second article by Najibeh Abbasi Rostami is a literature review of the BI and KM fields. In a previous issue we have discussed the relationship between CI and KM. Rostami presents the differences in the form of a number of models and summaries found in the existing literature. The articles conclude, not unexpectedly, that the literature clearly shows that a proper integration of the two functions are beneficial to organizations. More interesting the review also concludes that studies are needed to show how cultural aspects affect this dichotomy.

    The third article, the second opinion piece, is a case study by Pierre Memheld. The article illustrates a critical CI lesson through the use of a case presenting two major tire manufacturers troubled by a price war.  The article argue that intelligence failures can be caused by particular biases which may be culture related.

    The fourth article by Abdelkader Baaziz and Luc Quoniam is a discussion around “patent trolls” and Non Practicing Entities (NPE). The article is illustrated with two examples, or mini cases, from the pharmaceutical industry in two emerging countries. The article shows how the use of Web 2.0 technologies makes it easier to extract useful intelligence from patents.

    The last article by Klaus Solberg Søilen entitled “A survey of users’ perspectives and preferences as to the value of JISIB - a spot-check” show what users want from the journal JISIB. It concludes that more cases studies are requested, but it gives no credit to those who think there is too much or too little technology related material as opinions on this issue are balanced. A number of minor suggestions are presented and the survey shows that the question of editing language is not settled.

    As always we would first of all like to thank the authors for their contributions to this issue of JISIB.

    On behalf of the Editorial Board,

    Sincerely Yours,

    Prof. Dr.Klaus Solberg Søilen

    Editor-in-chief

  • 43.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 5, No 1 (2015)2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editorial Note Vol 5, Nr 2 (2015)2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    Editor's Note: A review of Competitive Intelligence as a discipline2015In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Exhibit Intelligence: Competitive Intelligence at Trade Shows2011In: Information Systems and Economic Intelligence : 4th. International Conference SIIE 2011. (Proceedings). February 17-19, 2011 (Marrakech, Morocco) / [ed] Jean-Paul Haton, Sahbi Sidhom, Malek Ghenima & Khalid Benzakour, Marrakech and Tunis: I.H.E. editions , 2011, p. 8-25Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for Technology, Innovation and Marketing Management (CTIM2).
    Exhibit Marketing & Trade Show Intelligence: Successful Boothmanship and Booth Design2013 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business and Engineering (SET), Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Geoeconomics2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the shift from geopolitics to geoeconomics the focus is no longer the Heartland or the Rimland, or any coherent geographical region, but the set of all geographical locations containing economically-important natural resources, what we shall call the Nareland (Natural Resource Lands). This new logic of dispersed geographical locations marks the shift from geopolitics to geoeconomics. The centre stage has been taken over by the private-sector organization, the corporation. This means that power has been transferred from the public to the private sphere. It means that the nation state is ceding its power to individuals – less in some countries and more in others, for instance less in Sweden than in the USA; but the trend is clear, and it is global.

  • 49.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, School of Management, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Gestion de la implementacion de Sistemas de Intelligencia de Negocios2010In: Inteligencia y seguridad: Revista de análisis y prospectiva, ISSN 1887-293X, no 9, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been much focus on why companies should invest in Business Intelligence (BI) and there has been many contributions on the BI process, but there has been and continues to be less written on how to implement BI in the organization. A major question facing all organizations, both private and public, is where to place the BI or Competitive Intelligence (CI) function in the organization. This answer will depend on the effectiveness of each placement. The findings presented in this article build on a decade of observations and research in the implementation of Business Intelligence Systems. A series of seven models are presented with examples of actual use.

  • 50.
    Solberg Søilen, Klaus
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL), Centre for International Marketing and Entrepreneurship Research (CIMER).
    How companies work and fail to work with business intelligence2017In: Journal of Intelligence Studies in Business, ISSN 2001-015X, E-ISSN 2001-015X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 4-4Article in journal (Other academic)
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