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  • 1.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Documentary Provenance and Digitized Collections2019In: The Document Academy (DOCAM) Annual meeting 2019 of Documents and Data: Ingémédia Department, University of Toulon, France, June 12–14, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For decades, memory institutions such as libraries and archives have been engaged in digitizing cultural heritage materials in their holdings (also in the form of large private-public partnerships such as Google Books). The collections usually take on the form of image reproductions (scans, digital photographs), text transcriptions (OCR’d or manually keyed) and varying degrees and types of metadata (usually legal and rudimentary bibliographic metadata). Although there are signs that public funding for large-scale digitization is decreasing in the US and many European countries, significant resources are still being invested in digitization. A whole range of humanities research depends on having these digitized collections available. Further, in humanities research such as digital scholarly editing, digital reproductions produced by memory institutions are not only referred to but incorporated as building blocks in the editions themselves. In such cases, they are not only used as mere illustrations accompanying a scholarly text transcription, but can also serve as research tools and as instruments for accountability and accessibility. Nevertheless, the critical inquiry of scholarly editors is directed towards text transcriptions, whereas digital images are often uncritically taken at face value, as objective representations of the source documents. There seems to be room for an increased critical understanding of such images as interpretations based on scholarly informed deliberation, or a ’document criticism’ for digital image reproductions in the manner of how textual criticism has been established since centuries to establish the history, relation and provenance of texts and their versions. Partly, this face value approach is fostered by mass digitization, with projects such as Google Books as a paradigm, where there is little room for scholarly considerations during the image capture. As a result, image capture is portrayed as a fairly trivial and straightforward task that can be more or less automated. But there are in fact many types and levels of library digitization, suggesting a map of variety with mass digitization in one corner and what has been termed critical or slow  digitization in the other. The choices made in terms of preferred processes have been shown to matter to the way memory institutions such as museums, archives and libraries are conceived of (Dahlström, Hansson and Kjellman 2012).

    A relatively small amount of research has explored the accuracy, usability and reusability of these digital representations to humanities scholars, the kind of research questions they open up for, and what degree of authenticity and trust we are able to ascribe to them. This paper explores the needs and potentials of such keys, instruments with which users can “investigate the road that documents have travelled”, to use the phrase from the CFP for this conference. What pieces of information (if any) do the digitizing institutions provide for users to ascertain the link between the digital representation on screen and the physical source document it purports to represent? The paper will:

    • address some of the critical considerations libraries and archives face when digitizing their holdings of text-based materials, with significant bearing on the value and (re)usability of the digital reproductions when placed within a scholarly context
    • discuss if and how scholarly inquiry is hindered by the way digitized collections are selected, formatted, made available and presented
    • discuss crucial concepts to understand the relation between digital image reproductions and represented sources, and
    • propose research avenues for exploring these concepts and questions in depth.

    Key concepts discussed in the paper are:

    • mass/speedy digitization versus critical/slow digitization and their un/critical management of digital reproductions
    • relation between source and reproduction:
      • linearity
      • historical provenance (to a single object, to several objects, or to a series of historical anchor points) and the variety of potential trajectories
    • authenticity, faithfulness and exhaustiveness of digital reproductions vis-à-vis sources
    • transparency and keys:
      • metadata and paradata (paradata concerns the processes of collecting, digitizing and curating the materials)

    The digital image reproduction invokes the virtual presence of the source, so the bond between reproduction and source is not only graphical and material but is also defined by a retrospective relationship between two points in history, the then and the now. A heightened awareness of this on the basis of a dedicated image criticism could serve as an incentive for digitizing institutions to increase the transparency of the production history of such images and to subject their degree of authenticity and (un)certainty to better scrutiny. Exhaustive paradata and metadata for the images, for instance, might be of paramount importance, providing information about states, production history, and digital provenance. What is missing for many current reproductions in digitized collections is the historical-bibliographical link between, on the one hand, what we see on the screen and, on the other, a particular identified artefact in a physical collection. In other words, which document was actually used when producing a given digital reproduction?

  • 2.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Kjellman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    'As we may digitize': institutions and documents reconfigured2012In: Liber quarterly: the journal of European research libraries, ISSN 1435-5205, E-ISSN 2213-056X, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 455-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article frames digitization as a knowledge organization practice in libraries and museums. The primarily discriminatory practices of museums are compared with the non-discriminatory practices of libraries when managing their respective cultural heritage collections. Digitization of cultural heritage brings new practices, tools and arenas that reconfigure and reinterpret not only the collections, but the memory institutions themselves as well as the roles they respectively play on a societal level. The development of digitization promises to bridge some gaps between libraries and museums, either by redefining their respective identity, or by forming new ground where the interests of the respective institutions naturally meet or even converge, or by neglecting particular tasks and roles that do not seem to find a natural home in the new territory. Two poles along a digitization strategy scale, mass digitization and critical digitization, are distinguished in the article. As memory institutions are redefined in their development of digitized document collections, e.g., by increasingly emphasizing a common trans-national rather than national cultural heritage, mass digitization and critical digitization represent alternative avenues. Museums, libraries and archives (MLA) endeavour aiming for joint tools and practices in digitizing cultural heritage collections need a thorough understanding of such mechanisms. The article re-contextualizes current digitization discourse: a) historically, by suggesting that digitization brings ancient practices back to life rather than invents entirely new ones from scratch; b) conceptually, by presenting a new label (critical digitization) for a digitization strategy that has hitherto been downplayed in digitization discourse; and c) theoretically, by exploring the relations between the values of different digitization strategies, the reconfiguration of collections as they are digitized, and the redefinition of MLA institutions through those processes. The arguments in the article are drawn from examples of digitization in different library contexts on both a national (Swedish) level and a European level.

  • 3.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    (Big) Data in Library and Information Science: A Brief Overview of Some Important Problem Areas2017In: Journal of universal computer science (Online), ISSN 0948-695X, E-ISSN 0948-6968, Vol. 23, no 11, p. 1098-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries hold a long history of a multidimensional focus on collecting, storing, organizing, preserving and providing access to information resources for various types of users. Data is nothing new to Library and Information Science (LIS) and Big Data presents a quantitative expansion of an already well-known object of study. Scholarly communication, data sharing and data curation are three areas related to data in LIS and are discussed in this paper in the light of current developments as well as from the perspective of attaining the research area relevance in the discipline over time. Big Data, new technologies and networked research environments will continue to increase both in numbers and size. LIS is rapidly developing tools to meet the opportunities arising - through educational initiatives and the development of new research areas such as data curation and altmetrics. Since social and political demands for open data grow, these issues are pressing.

  • 4.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Big data in Library and Information Science: from scientific communication and metadata to cultural sciences2015In: Big data: från hype till handling, Linnaeus University, 4 December 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Welcome and introduction: To workshop and participants2016In: 16th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop at the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2016 (DC-2016), 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Löwe, Welf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Computer Science.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Media Technology.
    LNU as a Unique iSchool2016Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, JoacimLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.Seldén, LarsLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology: Special Issue : iSchools Around the World2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Seldén, Lars
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Cult of the "I": Organizational symbolism and curricula in three Scandinavian iSchools with comparisons to three American2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 48-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum content in relation to these intentions. By doing so, a picture will be given of the international expansion of the iSchool concept in terms of organisational symbolism and practical educational content. In order to underline the approaches of the Scandinavian schools, comparisons are made to three American iSchools.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study is framed through theory on organisational symbolism and the intentions of the iSchool movement as formulated in its vision statements. Empirically, the study consists of two parts: close readings of three documents outlining the considerations of three Scandinavian LIS schools before applying for the iSchool status, and statistical analysis of 427 syllabi from master level courses at three Scandinavian and three American iSchools.

    Findings

    All three Scandinavian schools, analysed, have recently become iSchools, and though some differences are visible, it is hard to distinguish anything in their syllabi as carriers of what can be described as an iSchool identity. In considering iSchool identity, it instead benefits on a symbolic level that are most prominent, such as branding, social visibility and the possible attraction of new student groups. The traditionally strong relation to national library sectors are emphasised as important to maintain, specifically in Norway and Sweden.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study is done on iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with empirical comparison to three American schools. These comparisons face the challenge of meeting the educational system and programme structure of each individual country. Despite this, findings prove possible to use as ground for conclusions, although empirical generalisations concerning, for instance, other countries must be made with caution.

    Practical implications

    This study highlights the practical challenges met in international expansion of the iSchool movement, both on a practical and symbolic level. Both the iSchool Caucus and individual schools considering becoming iSchools may use these findings as a point of reference in development and decision making.

    Originality/value

    This is an original piece of research from which the results may contribute to the international development of the iSchool movement, and extend the theoretical understanding of the iSchool movement as an educational and organisational construct.

  • 9.
    Golub, Koraljka
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Soergel, Dagobert
    University of Buffalo, USA.
    Tudhope, Douglas
    University of South Wales, UK.
    Managing classification in libraries: a methodological outline for evaluating automatic subject indexing and classification in Swedish library catalogues2015In: Classification & authority control: expanding resource discovery - proceedings of the International UDC Seminar 2015, 29-30 october, Lisbon, Portugal / [ed] Aida Slavic, Maria Inês Cordeiro, Würtzburg: Ergon-Verlag, 2015, p. 163-174Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A point of view (considering e-books)2011In: Scandinavian Public Library Quarterly, ISSN 0036-5602, E-ISSN 1604-4843, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A point of view (reading and literature)2011In: Scandinavian Public Library Quarterly, ISSN 0036-5602, E-ISSN 1604-4843, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    A point of view (the users - who are they?)2011In: Scandinavian Public Library Quarterly, ISSN 0036-5602, E-ISSN 1604-4843, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Att bilda en bibliotekarie: essäer2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur bildas en bibliotekarie? Vad är poängen med att studera dokument i ett informationssamhälle? Är det självklart att vi ska digitalisera kulturarvet? Hur påverkar bibliometrin universiteten och forskningsbiblioteken? Vad skulle hända om någon faktiskt blev informationskompetent? Besökte Tutankhamon någonsin Malmö? Frågor som dessa söker sina svar i de sex fristående essäer som finns samlade i den här boken. Personligt, roande och oroande skriver Joacim Hansson om bibliotekarieutbildningens historia, biblioteks- och informationsvetenskapens teoriutveckling, kulturarvsdigitalisering, bibliometri och informationskompetens - allt mot en fond av vår egen samtids politiska och informationsteknologiska utveckling. Joacim Hansson är professor i biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap vid Linnéuniversitetet i Växjö.

  • 14.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Att göra rätt och vilja väl: om lagstadgade värdegrunder och bibliotekariers professionsetik2018In: Bibliotekarier i teori och praktik: utbildningsperspektiv på en unik profession / [ed] Joacim Hansson, Per Wisselgren, Lund: BTJ Förlag , 2018, p. 291-309Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Att vara där folket är: Om folkbibliotekens relation till folkbildningen och en problematisk samtid.2010In: Där människor och tankar möts:: bibliotek som folkbildning / [ed] Ingrid Atlestam och Ulla Forsén, Lund: BTJ Förlag , 2010, 1, p. 11-28Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Bibliotek och gamla böcker: Om folkbibliotekens förhållande till sitt äldre bokmaterial1996In: Kulturpolitisk tidskrift, no 3-4, p. 24-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Biblioteken och de nationella minoriteterna.2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Biblioteken som problemområde i biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap.2001In: Tidskrift för dokumentation, ISSN 0040-6872, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 81-88Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Bibliotekets idé.: Föreläsning i anslutning till installation som professor i biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap vid Linnéuniversitetet, den 27 maj 2010.2011In: Humanetten, ISSN 1403-2279, no 26, p. 3-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Catching the Ch'i: Tai Chi Chuan as embodied documentation2017In: Annual Meeting of the Document Academy (DOCAM): 29-30 september 2017, Indiana University, Bloomington, IA, USA, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tai Chi is a form of moving deep meditation practice of Chinese origin. Rooted in Daoism, its earliest history is obscure, with evidence suggesting that it has been practiced in a growing variety of forms since at least the 13th century CE. Today, Tai Chi is gaining popularity all over the world as a form of relaxation practice. When presented popularily it is often attached to, on the one hand, a romanticized eastern discourse on bodily energy flows to be released for increased happiness, and on the other hand, more clinically oriented medical claims that it may cure everything from ordinary backpains to Parkinson’s disease. Tai Chi is, however, also subjected to a more narrow and original discourse, namely that of not only ”releasing” inner energies, but more specifically representing a special kind of energy, the Ch’i. Elusive as it is, Ch’i is the basic energetic principle that lies behind the construct of Yin and Yang, the creative/receiving principles of all life defined in the I Ching. This representational feature which sets Tai Chi (which translates as the ”supreme ultimate”) apart from all other Chinese medical practice begs the question of whether it is possible to study the Tai Chi form as a document in itself, not only representing, but also presenting the basic principles of life.

    This presentation addresses Tai Chi practice as performative documentation and the purpose is to try it against some of the basic concepts which have emerged in document studies and information studies over the last couple of decades. The aim is to see how far the concept of a document can be stretched when there is an absence of materiality, both in that what is being represented by the document and in the document itself.

    The presentation defines an ”initial document” (the Tai Chi form itself), supplemented by ”derived documentation” as defined by documentation pioneer Suzanne Briet. Derived documentation in Tai Chi is shown as an overview of rhetorical constructs focusing philosophical, medical, pedagogical and martial arts related content. Three basic categories of functionality are identified in the derived documentation; ontological, performative, and legitimizing.

    The Tai Chi form as initial document, with support of derived documentation and its functional categories, is treated as a complex of documentation, addressed in relation to current discussions in document studies concerning (1) document representativity as originally laid out by Suzanne Briet in her 1951 treatise ”What is Documentation?”, and (2) complementarity as introduced in document studies by Niels W. Lund in 2004. Conclusions suggests that chosen conceptual constructs may be used in addressing and defining documentary properties and processes beyond our traditional understanding of documents and documentation processes, and that in such a development, Tai Chi may be formulated as a kind of embodied documentation.

  • 21.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Chantal Mouffe's Theory of Agonistic Pluralism and Its Relevance for Library and Information Science Research.2010In: Critical Theory for Library and Information Science.: Exploring the Social from Across the Disciplines / [ed] Gloria J. Leckie, Lisa M. Given and John E. Buschman, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2010, 1, p. 249-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22. Hansson, Joacim
    Den svenska hållningen till Dewey-systemet vid tiden för utarbetandet av "Klassifikationssystem för svenska bibliotek".1995In: Biblioteken, kulturen och den sociala intelligensen: Aktuell forskning inom biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap. / [ed] Lars Höglund, Göteborg: FRN / Valfrid , 1995, p. 340-355Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Hansson, Joacim
    Det lokala folkbiblioteket: Förändringar under hundra år2005Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Documentality and legitimacy in future libraries: an analytical framework for initiated speculation2015In: New Library World, ISSN 0307-4803, E-ISSN 1758-6909, Vol. 116, no 1/2, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this article is to contribute to a discussion about the future of librarianship.

    Design/methodology/approach – An analytical framework is used to discuss the future of libraries. The framework is based on current trends in contemporary librarianship and is used as a way of structuring predictions about the future of librarianship. Special attention is given to public libraries and academic libraries.

    Findings – Libraries are seen moving from a traditional situation with a high degree of constitutive documentality and internal legitimacy with collections in focus to one with a high degree of performative documentality and external legitimacy, with adjustment to user needs as the prime goal. This development is related to the emergence of New Public Management and can be seen both in public and academic libraries. It is expected to continue for the foreseeable future.

    Originality/value – The analytical framework and concepts used are originally developed for this text and prove to be valuable tools in fulfilling the purpose of the article. It represents a new and original way of discussing the future of libraries.

  • 25.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Documentality as inscribed acts: ontology, technology and practice of professional codes of ethics in librarianship2013In: Presented at the 10th Annual meeting of the Document Academy, Tromsø, Norway, June 19th-22nd, 2013: DOCAM'13, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Educating librarians in the contemporary university: an essay on iSchools and emancipatory resilience in library and information science2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Library education is changing. At a time when librarianship is increasingly seen as part of the information industry, Library and Information Science is also searching for its place in a new and rapidly developing university landscape.

    This book analyzes the development of the contemporary university in light of present critical social theory, focusing on such aspects as academic acceleration, organizational accretion and the rise of an ”entrepreneurial spirit,” all of which have both epistemological and organizational consequences. Library and Information Science has proven well-suited to meet this development. One way has been through the rapid international growth of the iSchool movement, now counting close to a hundred member schools all across the world. iSchools not only meet the requirements of contemporary university development, but also contribute to a recontextualization of librarianship and library education. As the iSchool movement relates to a view of information as a commodity and the ”iField” to increased economic growth, it recontextualizes the library sector, traditionally connected to democratic development based on the ideas of the Enlightenment.

    Educating librarians in the Contemporary University is written from a European perspective, and examples such as the EU research platform, Horizon 2020, Government Research Proposals, and policy documents from European iSchools are used in an attempt to understand the current development in Library and Information Science and its relevance for librarianship. As the European Research and Development Sector increasingly connects universities to the solution of various ”social challenges” with emphasis on commercial collaborations, the view on knowledge and use of university resources are affected in a way which seemingly make critical analyses difficult.

    Questions are asked about the relation between iSchools, late capitalism and the development of Critical Librarianship. Is there a way of fulfilling the ambitions of the critical theory classics and achieve research and an education environment which encourage emancipatory goals within the iSchool movement?

  • 27.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Etiska koders betydelse för bibliotekariers professionella identitet ur ett dokumentteoretiskt perspektiv2016In: Mötesplats Profession - Forskning, Borås, 27-28 oktober 2016, 2016, p. 1-19Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Folkbibliotek i glesbygd: kunskapsläge och erfarenheter2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här kartläggningen undersöker verksamheten i folkbibliotek i glesbygdsmiljöer i förhållande till utpekade verksamhetsområden och målgrupper i bibliotekslagen. Syftet är att se om det finns några områden i bibliotekslagen som är svåra att leva upp till och i så fall varför. Undersökningen genomförs med fokus på de prioritetsområden i bibliotekslagen som tydligast relaterar till folkbibliotekens verksamhet; läsfrämjande, tillgänglighet, prioriterade grupper, kvalitet och allsidighet i mediebeståndet, digital delaktighet samt samverkan mellan olika delar av bibliotekssektorn.

    Kartläggningen består av två delar:

    1. En kunskapsöversikt, där svensk och internationell biblioteks-och informationsvetenskaplig forskning med fokus på glesbygdsrelevanta biblioteksfrågor diskuteras. Avsnittet rymmer också kommentarer till ett antal nyligen genomförda svenska utredningar ur ett glesbygdsperspektiv.
    2. En empirisk studie, där bibliotekarier och biblioteksassistenter deltagit i intervjuer och gruppdiskussioner om bibliotekslagens prioritetsområden i workshopform. Sammanlagt har 47 bibliotekarier och biblioteksassistenter från 34 kommuner i fyra regioner deltagit. Detta har kompletterats med 10 intervjuer med representanter för ytterligare kommunbibliotek, de samiska biblioteken och fyra regionbibliotek.

    Resultatet visar att förutsättningarna för folkbiblioteken i glesbygdskommuner varierar. Påtagligt är att laguppfyllelse sker trots ofta mycket små och ansträngda resurser. Detta påverkar möjligheten att bygga verksamheter utöver det som krävs för att enbart hålla biblioteken öppna. Särskilt hårt drabbat är läsfrämjandearbetet, arbetet med de nationella minoriteterna och urfolket samer samt frågor som rör digital delaktighet och digitalisering. Glesbygdsbibliotekens arbete beskrivs regelmässigt i undersökningen som utpräglat socialt, både i meningen att till exempel läsfrämjandearbetet i hög grad bygger på en upparbetad närhet mellan bibliotekarier och användare och att glesbygdens folkbibliotekarier idag får ta en mängd arbetsuppgifter som kommer sig av att det offentliga samhället på många platser dragit sig tillbaka helt. Detta påverkar både bibliotekens identitet och legitimitet.

    Kartläggningen pekar på ett brett behov av långsiktiga statliga stimulansmedel i linje med Stärkta bibliotek, ett behov av en tydligare, mer transparent, nationell samordning av digitala medieresurser samt ökade initiativ för att tillgodose de kompetensbehov som finns och som i glesbygdsbiblioteken är mycket svåra att tillgodose.

  • 29. Hansson, Joacim
    Folkbibliotekens ideologiska förändring speglad i två statliga utredningar: en komparativ stuidie av 1911 års folkbiblioteksutredning och 1995 års kulturutredning1997In: Svensk biblioteksforskning, ISSN 0284-4354, E-ISSN 1653-5235, no 1-2, p. 71-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Folkets bibliotek?: texter i urval 1994-2012.2012Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31. Hansson, Joacim
    Framväxten av "Klassifikationssystem för svenska bibliotek" mot bakgrund av folkbibliotekens tidiga utveckling och äldre svenska klassifikationspraxis.1995In: Svensk biblioteksforskning, ISSN 0284-4354, E-ISSN 1653-5235, no 2, p. 14-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Förord till den svenska översättningen av Gabriel Naudé:s 'Advis pour dresser une bibliothèque' - Råd för upprättandet av ett bibliotek.  2006In: Svensk biblioteksforskning, ISSN 0284-4354, E-ISSN 1653-5235, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Hansson, Joacim
    Hermeneutics as a bridge between the modern and the postmodern i Library and Informatioon science2005In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 102-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Hansson, Joacim
    In my mind's eye: In search of the mimetic relationship between the evolvement of a library classification and its social discourses1996In: Information Science - Interaction in perspective: Proceedings / [ed] Peter Ingwersen & Niels-Ole Pors, Copenhagen: Royal School of Librarianship , 1996, p. 99-115Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Integrerade bibliotek - mer än bara samarbete?2008In: DF-revy, ISSN 0106-0503, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36. Hansson, Joacim
    Just collaboration or really something else?: on joint use libraries and normative institutional change with two examples from Sweden2006In: Library Trends, ISSN 0024-2594, E-ISSN 1559-0682, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 549-568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Klassifikation, bibliotek och samhälle: En kritisk hermeneutisk studie av "Klassifikationssystem för svenska bibliotek".1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 38. Hansson, Joacim
    Knowledge organisation from an institutional point of view: implications for theoretical and practical development2006In: Progressive Librarian, ISSN 1052-5726, no 27, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Kära folkbibliotek, vart tog du vägen?2009In: Ordfronts litterära magasin, ISSN 0284-981X, no December, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Libraries and identity: The role of institutional self-image and identity in the emergence of new types of libraries2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Library and Information Science -  tradition and modernity: a critical reflection2011In: Proceedings from Communication and Information Sciences in Network Society, Vilnius, Lithuania,  16-17 june 2011, Vilnius: Faculty of communication, Vilnius University , 2011, p. 9-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42. Hansson, Joacim
    Modul cum reflecta clasificarea bibliografica societatea: cazul sistemului suedez SAB2006In: Studii de Biblioteconomie si Stiinta Informarii, ISSN 1453-5386, no 10, p. 144-152Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Hansson, Joacim
    New document environments and institutional identity: Joint use libraries at the crossroads between the physical and the digital library.2007In: Joint Use Libraries: An international conference / [ed] Bundy, Alan, Adelaide: AUSLIB Press , 2007, p. 79-83Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper.
    Om folkbibliotekens ideologiska identitet: en diskursstudie1998Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    On the pre-history of library ethics: documents and legitimacy2016In: Information cultures in the digital age: a Festschrift in honour of Raphael Capurro / [ed] Matthew Kelly, Jared Bielby, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2016, 1, p. 307-319Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter pursues an argument that librarianship has a long tradition of consistent ethical statements regarding the profession that, in more or less formal ways, have been prescriptive in character. The main focus is the relation between these statements and the kinds of documents in which they are formulated. It is argued that at various times in the history of librarianship certain types of documents have rendered ethical aspects of the library profession legitimacy and thus have taken on a prescriptive role. Empirically, three such documents are analysed; an ethical code from the early 20th century, a 17th century handbook in librarianship and a Papal Bulla from the late 15th century. As the main focus of the article lies on the long period before the emergence of formal ethical codes, emphasis lies on the two latter documents. Alhough different in character and scope these documents construct a continuous ethical foundation for librarianship in at least three aspects: (1) definitions of professional identity, (2) statements of core values, and (3) reiterations of multiple obligations. Seen in relation to historical periods and types of libraries—Bibliotheca Apostolica in Rome, a baroque library in Paris, and American public libraries—these documents create legitimacy for the profession through their respective contemporary relevance. This, in turn, raises the question of which kinds of documents are to formulate legitimate ethical guidlines for librarianship in a future where relative authority and legitimacy of different types of documents are becoming increasingly dificult to discern.

  • 46.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Professional value and ethical self-regulation in the development of modern librarianship: The documentality of library ethics2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1261-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to make a contribution to the theoretical understanding of documents and documentary agency in society through examples from a defined institutional and professional setting; and second, to create an understanding for the role of ethical codes in the process of defining and developing modern librarianship.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This study analyses the role of documentation carrying content of professional ethics in the formulation of modern librarianship. This is done through a series of example documents of various kinds, such as founding charters, peer handbooks and ethical codes systematically analysed through the use of document theory and theory on institutional change.

    Findings

    The findings of this study suggest that documents pronouncing ethical self-regulation within librarianship play a primarily legitimising role in situations where new types of libraries emerge or when libraries adapt to social change. The study proposes legitimacy as a key aspect of documentality, thus supplementing the established understanding of the concept.

    Originality/value

    This study is the first to analyse the role of ethical codes in libraries using document theory. It brings new knowledge to the role of ethical self-regulation in librarianship over time and in different institutional contexts. In suggesting a developed definition of documentality, it contributes to the theoretical understanding of the role of documents and documentation in institutions and in society at large.

  • 47.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Professionalism, folkbildning och de socialt underpriviligierade.2003In: Biblioteksbladet, ISSN 1651-5447, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 12-14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48. Hansson, Joacim
    Professionalism och folkbildande identitet i dagens folkbibliotek.2002In: Årsbok om folkbildning. 2002: Forskning & utveckling, Stockholm: Föreningen för folkbildningsforskning , 2002, p. 89-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Public libraries and the national minorities of Sweden – results of a national survey2011In: New Library World, ISSN 0307-4803, E-ISSN 1758-6909, Vol. 112, no 9/10, p. 406-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Hansson, Joacim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Recognising the other through promotion of reading, collection development and communal collaboration: rural public libraries in the far-north of Sweden and their relation to the indigenous Sámi population2019In: CoLIS 10, Conceptions of Library and Information Science, 10th international conference: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Tanja Merčun, Polona Vilar, Ljubljana: Ljubljana University Press, Faculty of Arts , 2019, p. 69-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This study reports findings from a study on the relation between rural public libraries and the Sámi population in northern Sweden, placed in the context of minority priorities given required by the Swedish Library Act.

    Method. Full day worshop focus-group interviews were made with public librarians from 34 rural counties in Northern Sweden, and follow-up interviews were conducted with representatives of the Sámi library sector.

    Analysis. Qualitative analysis was carried out inspired by the concept of institutional ethnography. Capturing the relation between individual experiences and institutional structures, results were related to the concept of recognition as a moral basis for legitimate indigenous struggle.

    Results. Results indicate that rural public libraries have difficulties meeting the requirements of the Library Act. Reasons are lack of general resources, lack of knowledge in indigenous librarianship and limited production of literature in the Sámi language varieties spoken in Sweden.   

    Conclusion. Further development of Sámi designated administrative areas and increased production of literature in Sámi language varieties stand out as the two most important factors in making daily work in  public libraries able to reach the requirements of the Library Act in terms of recognition of the informational and cultural needs of the Sámi people.

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