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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Fakulteten för hälsa, natur- och teknikvetenskap (from 2013).
    Att som ambulanssjuksköterska vara förberedd i samband med svårt sjuk patient.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Att som ambulanssjuksköterska vara förberedd i samband med svårt sjuk patient.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för omvårdnad.
    The prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients’ by specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden-a phenomenographic study2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 20, p. 67-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A common feature of prehospital emergency care is the short and fragmentary patient encounters with increased demands for efficient and rapid treatment. Crucial decisions are often made and the premise is the specialist ambulance nurse’s ability to capture the situation instantaneously. The assessment is therefore a pre-requisite for decisions about appropriate actions. However, the low exposure to severe trauma cases in Sweden leads to vulnerability for the specialist ambulance nurse, which makes the assessment more difficult. Our objective was to describe specialist ambulance nurses’ perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma.

    Methods

    This study had a phenomenographic approach and was performed in 2011 as an interview study. 15 specialist ambulance nurses with a minimum of 2.5 years of experience from praxis were included. The analysis of data was performed using phenomenography according to Marton.

    Results

    The perceptions of assessing patients exposed to severe trauma were divided into: To be prepared for emergency situations, Confidence in one’s own leadership and Developing professional knowledge.

    Conclusions

    This study reveals that the specialist ambulance nurse, on the scene of accident, finds the task of assessment of severe trauma patients difficult and complicated. In some cases, even exceeding what they feel competent to accomplish. The specialist ambulance nurses feel that no trauma scenarios are alike and that more practical skills, more training, exercise and feedback are needed.

  • 4.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    The prehospital assessment of severe trauma patients’ by specialist ambulance nurse in Sweden-a phenomenographic study2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 20, p. 67-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    What is dignity in prehospital emergency care?2017In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 268-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Ethics and dignity in prehospital emergency care are important due to vulnerability and suffering. Patients can lose control of their body and encounter unfamiliar faces in an emergency situation.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe what specialist ambulance nurse students experienced as preserved and humiliated dignity in prehospital emergency care.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: The study had a qualitative approach.

    METHOD: Data were collected by Flanagan's critical incident technique. The participants were 26 specialist ambulance nurse students who described two critical incidents of preserved and humiliated dignity, from prehospital emergency care. Data consist of 52 critical incidents and were analyzed with interpretive content analysis.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study followed the ethical principles in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

    FINDINGS: The result showed how human dignity in prehospital emergency care can be preserved by the ambulance nurse being there for the patient. The ambulance nurses meet the patient in the patient's world and make professional decisions. The ambulance nurse respects the patient's will and protects the patient's body from the gaze of others. Humiliated dignity was described through the ambulance nurse abandoning the patient and by healthcare professionals failing, disrespecting, and ignoring the patient.

    DISCUSSION: It is a unique situation when a nurse meets a patient face to face in a critical life or death moment. The discussion describes courage and the ethical vision to see another human.

    CONCLUSION: Dignity was preserved when the ambulance nurse showed respect and protected the patient in prehospital emergency care. The ambulance nurse students' ethical obligation results in the courage to see when a patient's dignity is in jeopardy of being humiliated. Humiliated dignity occurs when patients are ignored and left unprotected. This ethical dilemma affects the ambulance nurse students badly due to the fact that the morals and attitudes of ambulance nurses are reflected in their actions toward the patient.

  • 6.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    What is dignity in prehospital emergency care?2017In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 268-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Ethics and dignity in prehospital emergency care are important due to vulnerability and suffering. Patients can lose control of their body and encounter unfamiliar faces in an emergency situation.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe what specialist ambulance nurse students experienced as preserved and humiliated dignity in prehospital emergency care.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: The study had a qualitative approach.

    METHOD: Data were collected by Flanagan's critical incident technique. The participants were 26 specialist ambulance nurse students who described two critical incidents of preserved and humiliated dignity, from prehospital emergency care. Data consist of 52 critical incidents and were analyzed with interpretive content analysis.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study followed the ethical principles in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

    FINDINGS: The result showed how human dignity in prehospital emergency care can be preserved by the ambulance nurse being there for the patient. The ambulance nurses meet the patient in the patient's world and make professional decisions. The ambulance nurse respects the patient's will and protects the patient's body from the gaze of others. Humiliated dignity was described through the ambulance nurse abandoning the patient and by healthcare professionals failing, disrespecting, and ignoring the patient.

    DISCUSSION: It is a unique situation when a nurse meets a patient face to face in a critical life or death moment. The discussion describes courage and the ethical vision to see another human.

    CONCLUSION: Dignity was preserved when the ambulance nurse showed respect and protected the patient in prehospital emergency care. The ambulance nurse students' ethical obligation results in the courage to see when a patient's dignity is in jeopardy of being humiliated. Humiliated dignity occurs when patients are ignored and left unprotected. This ethical dilemma affects the ambulance nurse students badly due to the fact that the morals and attitudes of ambulance nurses are reflected in their actions toward the patient.

  • 7.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Suserud, Bjorn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Ambulance Nurses' Competence and Perception of Competence in Prehospital Trauma Care2018In: Emergency Medicine International, ISSN 2090-2840, E-ISSN 2090-2859, article id 5910342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. We focus on trauma care conducted in the context of a simulated traumatic event. This is in this study defined as a four-meter fall onto a hard surface, resulting in severe injuries to extremities in the form of bilateral open femur fractures, an open tibia fracture, and a closed pelvic fracture, all fractures bleeding extensively. Methods. The simulated trauma care competence of 63 ambulance nurses in prehospital emergency care was quantitatively evaluated along with their perception of their sufficiency. Data was collected by means of simulated trauma care and a questionnaire. Results. Life-saving interventions were not consistently performed. Time to perform interventions could be considered long due to the life-threatening situation. In comparison, the ambulance nurses' perception of the sufficiency of their theoretical and practical knowledge and skills for trauma care scored high. In contrast, the perception of having sufficient ethical training for trauma care scored low. Discussion. This study suggests there is no guarantee that the ambulance nurses' perception of theoretical and practical knowledge and skill level corresponds with their performed knowledge and skill. The ambulance nurses rated themselves having sufficient theoretical and practical knowledge and skills while the score of trauma care can be considered quite low.

  • 8.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Suserud, Bjorn-Ove
    Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare, PreHospen, Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Effect of Repeated Simulation on the Quality of Trauma Care2017In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Simulation participants are not dependent on learning during an actual clinical situation. This allows for a learning environment that can be constructed to meet the knowledge and experience needs of the participant. Simulations in a prehospital emergency are an ideal way to address these needs without risking patient safety. Method: Nurses in prehospital emergency care (n = 63) participated in simulation interventions. During the simulation, the performed trauma care was assessed in two groups of participants with different frequency of simulation. Results: Several statistically significant differences and clinical improvements were found within and between the groups. Differences were noted in specific assessments, examinations, care actions, and time from assessment to action. Conclusion: The result suggested that repeated simulation may contribute to a clinical improvement in trauma care, and more frequent simulation may led to even greater improvements. (c) 2017 International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 9.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Effect of repeated simulation on the quality of trauma care2017In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Simulation participants are not dependent on learning during an actual clinical situation. This allows for a learning environment that can be constructed to meet the knowledge and experience needs of the participant. Simulations in a prehospital emergency are an ideal way to address these needs without risking patient safety.

    Method

    Nurses in prehospital emergency care (n = 63) participated in simulation interventions. During the simulation, the performed trauma care was assessed in two groups of participants with different frequency of simulation.

    Results

    Several statistically significant differences and clinical improvements were found within and between the groups. Differences were noted in specific assessments, examinations, care actions, and time from assessment to action.

    Conclusion

    The result suggested that repeated simulation may contribute to a clinical improvement in trauma care, and more frequent simulation may led to even greater improvements.

  • 10.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Experiences of simulation in prehospital emergency care settings, the paramedic and ambulance nurses` point of view2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of simulation in prehospital emergency care settings, the paramedic and ambulance nurses` point of view2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Learning by simulation in prehospital emergency care: an integrative literature review2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acquiring knowledge and experience on high-energy trauma is often difficult due to infrequent exposure. This creates a need for training which is specifically tailored for complex prehospital conditions. Simulation provides an opportunity for ambulance nurses to focus on the actual problems in clinical practice and to develop knowledge regarding trauma care. The aim of this study was to describe what ambulance nurses and paramedics in prehospital emergency care perceive as important for learning when participating in simulation exercises.

    METHODS: An integrative literature review was carried out. Criteria for inclusion were primary qualitative and quantitative studies, where research participants were ambulance nurses or paramedics, working within prehospital care settings, and where the research interventions involved simulation.

    RESULTS: It was perceived important for the ambulance nurses' learning that scenarios were advanced and possible to simulate repeatedly. The repetitions contributed to increase the level of experience, which in turn improved the patients care. Moreover, realism in the simulation and being able to interact and communicate with the patient were perceived as important aspects, as was debriefing, which enabled the enhancement of knowledge and skills. The result is presented in the following categories: To gain experience, To gain practice and To be strengthened by others.

    CONCLUSION: Learning through simulation does not require years of exposure to accident scenes. The simulated learning is enhanced by realistic, stressful scenarios where ambulance nurses interact with the patients. In this study, being able to communicate with the patient was highlighted as a positive contribution to learning. However, this has seldom been mentioned in a previous research on simulation. Debriefing is important for learning as it enables scrutiny of one's actions and thereby the possibility to improve and adjust one's caring. The effect of simulation exercises is important on patient outcome.

  • 13.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning by simulation in prehospital emergency care: an integrative literature review2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Acquiring knowledge and experience on high-energy trauma is often difficult due to infrequent exposure. This creates a need for training which is specifically tailored for complex prehospital conditions. Simulation provides an opportunity for ambulance nurses to focus on the actual problems in clinical practice and to develop knowledge regarding trauma care. The aim of this study was to describe what ambulance nurses and paramedics in prehospital emergency care perceive as important for learning when participating in simulation exercises.

    METHODS: An integrative literature review was carried out. Criteria for inclusion were primary qualitative and quantitative studies, where research participants were ambulance nurses or paramedics, working within prehospital care settings, and where the research interventions involved simulation.

    RESULTS: It was perceived important for the ambulance nurses' learning that scenarios were advanced and possible to simulate repeatedly. The repetitions contributed to increase the level of experience, which in turn improved the patients care. Moreover, realism in the simulation and being able to interact and communicate with the patient were perceived as important aspects, as was debriefing, which enabled the enhancement of knowledge and skills. The result is presented in the following categories: To gain experience, To gain practice and To be strengthened by others.

    CONCLUSION: Learning through simulation does not require years of exposure to accident scenes. The simulated learning is enhanced by realistic, stressful scenarios where ambulance nurses interact with the patients. In this study, being able to communicate with the patient was highlighted as a positive contribution to learning. However, this has seldom been mentioned in a previous research on simulation. Debriefing is important for learning as it enables scrutiny of one's actions and thereby the possibility to improve and adjust one's caring. The effect of simulation exercises is important on patient outcome.

  • 14.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Centre for prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning High-Energy Trauma Care Through Simulation2018In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 17, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation provides the opportunity to learn how to care for patients in complexsituations, such as when patients are exposed to high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents.The aim of the study was to describe nurses’ perceptions of high-energy trauma care through simulationin prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conductedwith 20 nurses after performing a simulated training series. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographicmethod. The result indicates that simulation establishes, corrects, and confirms knowledge andskills related to trauma care in prehosp ital emergency settings. Trauma knowledge is readily availablein memory and can be quickly retrieved in a future trauma situation.

  • 15.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Simulation of high-energy trauma makes knowledge readily available from memoryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Simulation of high-energy trauma makes knowledge readily available from memoryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Suserud, Björ-Ove
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care: a literature review.2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 22, p. 12-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes place during the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead be carried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice.

    Methods:

    An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative research methods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For published articles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospital settings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context.

    Results:

    The volume of published research is distributed between 1984-2012 and across the regions North America, Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors, animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospital care providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage.

    Conclusion:

    Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. It provides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realistic conditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care, CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integral role in this. The current state of prehospital care, which this review reveals, includes inadequate skills of prehospital staff regarding ventilation and CPR, on both children and adults, the lack of skills in paediatric resuscitation and the lack of knowledge in assessing and managing burns victims. These circumstances suggest critical areas for further training and research, at both local and global levels.

  • 18.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, Ingrid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Suserud, Björ-Ove
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Mapping the use of simulation in prehospital care: a literature review.2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, no 22, p. 12-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:High energy trauma is rare and, as a result, training of prehospital care providers often takes placeduring the real situation, with the patient as the object for the learning process. Such training could instead becarried out in the context of simulation, out of danger for both patients and personnel. The aim of this study wasto provide an overview of the development and foci of research on simulation in prehospital care practice.Methods:An integrative literature review were used. Articles based on quantitative as well as qualitative researchmethods were included, resulting in a comprehensive overview of existing published research. For publishedarticles to be included in the review, the focus of the article had to be prehospital care providers, in prehospitalsettings. Furthermore, included articles must target interventions that were carried out in a simulation context.Results:The volume of published research is distributed between 1984- 2012 and across the regions North America,Europe, Oceania, Asia and Middle East. The simulation methods used were manikins, films, images or paper, live actors,animals and virtual reality. The staff categories focused upon were paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs),medical doctors (MDs), nurse and fire fighters. The main topics of published research on simulation with prehospitalcare providers included: Intubation, Trauma care, Cardiac Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), Ventilation and Triage.Conclusion:Simulation were described as a positive training and education method for prehospital medical staff. Itprovides opportunities to train assessment, treatment and implementation of procedures and devices under realisticconditions. It is crucial that the staff are familiar with and trained on the identified topics, i.e., intubation, trauma care,CPR, ventilation and triage, which all, to a very large degree, constitute prehospital care. Simulation plays an integralrole in this. The current state of prehospital care, which this review reveals, includes inadequate skills of prehospital staffregarding ventilation and CPR, on both children and adults, the lack of skills in paediatric resuscitation and the lack ofknowledge in assessing and managing burns victims. These circumstances suggest critical areas for further training andresearch, at both local and global levels

  • 19.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademy.
    Modh, Carin
    Silvergrensgatan.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademy.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Akershus university.
    First-time pregnant women's experiences of their body in early pregnancy2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Jan, Nilsson
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lillemor, Lindwall
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

  • 21.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice2018In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

  • 22.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Value conflicts in perioperative practice2018In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, article id 969733018798169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves.

    OBJECTIVES:: This study describes operating theatre nurses' experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:: The study followed ethical principles in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and approval was granted by the local university ethics committee.

    FINDINGS:: The result showed that value conflicts arose in perioperative practice when operating theatre nurses were prevented from being present in the perioperative nursing process, because of current habits in perioperative practice. The patient's care became uncaring when health professionals did not see and listen to each other and when collaboration in the surgical team was not available for the patient's best. This occurred when operating theatre nurses' competence was not taken seriously and was ignored in patient care.

    CONCLUSION:: Value conflicts arose when operating theatre nurses experienced that continuity of patient care was lacking. They experienced compassion with the patient but still had the will and ability to be there and take responsibility for the patient. This led to feelings of despair, powerlessness and of having a bad conscience which could lead to dissatisfaction, and even resignations.

  • 23.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Preserved dignity inperioperative nursing.2012In: The 13th ICNE Conferencein Izmir, Turkey, 4-6 October.Abstarct book, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Möller, Gudrun
    Linköpings universitet Hälsouniversitetet.
    Björn, Catrine
    Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Olsson, Lotta
    Landstinget i Värmland.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Supervisor commission in distance education2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Willasen, E
    Akershus University Norge.
    von Post, Irene
    Åbo Akademi.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Student nurses' experiences of preserved dignity in perioperative practice: Part 12015In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 676-687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:In recent years, operating theatre nurse students' education focussed on ethical value issues and how the patient's dignity is respected in the perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient's care during surgery.

    OBJECTIVE:The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nurse students experienced and interpreted as preserved dignity in perioperative practice.

    RESEARCH DESIGN:The study has a descriptive design with a hermeneutic approach. Data were collected using Flanagan's critical incident technique.

    PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT:Operating theatre nurse students from Sweden and Norway participated and collected data in 2011, after education in ethics and dignity. Data consisting of 47 written stories and the text were analysed with hermeneutical text interpretation.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS:The study was conducted accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by a local University Ethics Research Committee. FINDINGS:The findings revealed that students experienced that operating theatre nurses perserved patient's dignity in perioperative practice by being present for each other and making themselves known to the patient. Operating theatre nurses caring for the patient by being compassionate and preserved the patient privacy. The new understanding that emerged was that the operating theatre nurse students understood that the operating theatre nurse wanted to care for the patient like a human being. DISCUSSION:In the discussion, we have illuminated how professional ethics may be threatened by more pragmatic and utilitarian arguments contained in regulations and transplant act. CONCLUSION:Preserved dignity is an ethical and caring act. Ethical questions and how to preserve dignity in perioperative practice should be discussed more both in educations of healthcare professionals and in clinical practice.

  • 26.
    Boussaid, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Dahlgren, Monica
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Nurses learn caring theory by being co-researchers in a surgical setting2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 393-398Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Brundin, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Hälsohögskolan i Värmland.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Hälsohögskolan i Värmland.
    von Post, Iréne
    Hälsohögskolan i Värmland.
    Att lära perioperativ vård: utvärdering av studieguide, ett didaktiskt utvecklingsarbete1996Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Caspari, Synnove
    et al.
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Raholm, Maj-Britt
    Sogn Fjordane University College.
    Saeteren, Berit
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Stord Haugesund University College, Norway.
    Lillesto, Britt
    Nord University, Norway.
    Lohne, Vibeke
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Slettebo, Ashild
    University Agder, Norway.
    Heggestad, Anne Kari T.
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Hoy, Bente
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Naden, Dagfinn
    Oslo Metropolitan University.
    Tension between freedom and dependence: A challenge for residents who live in nursing homes2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4119-4127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To present results from interviews of older people living in nursing homes, on how they experience freedom. Background We know that freedom is an existential human matter, and research shows that freedom remains important throughout life. Freedom is also important for older people, but further research is needed to determine how these people experience their freedom. The background for this article was a Scandinavian study that occurred in nursing homes; the purpose of the study was to gain knowledge about whether the residents felt that their dignity was maintained and respected. Design The design was hermeneutic, with qualitative research interviews. MethodTwenty-eight residents living in nursing homes in Denmark, Sweden and Norway were interviewed. Collecting tools used were an interview guide and also a tape recorder. Researchers in the three countries performed the interviews. The data were transcribed and analysed on three levels of hermeneutic interpretation. Results To have their freedom was emphasised as very important according to their experience of having their dignity taken care of. The following main themes emerged: (a) Autonomy or paternalism; (b) Inner and outer freedom; and (c) Dependence as an extra burden. ConclusionsResidents in a nursing home may experience the feeling of having lost their freedom. This conclusion has implications for healthcare professionals and researchers, as it is important for residents in nursing homes to feel that they still have their freedom. Relevance to clinical practiceIn clinical practice, it is important and valuable for the staff to consider how they can help older people feel that they still have their freedom.

  • 29.
    Caspari, Synnöve
    et al.
    Høgskolen i Oslo og Akershus, Norway.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
    Dignity and existentialconcerns among nursing homes residents from the perspective of their relatives2014In: Clinical nursing studies, ISSN 2324-7940, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 22-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this cross-country Scandinavian study was to explore how residents in nursing homes experience that their dignity is promoted and attended to. This is one part of the Scandinavian project in which we interviewed residents, relatives and staff members.

    Background: The main subject concerns the dignity of residents of nursing homes for older people. This article brings forward results from interviews of relatives on how they experience that the dignity is met, promoted and attended to for their next of kin.

    Design: The study was qualitative with a hermeneutic approach.

    Methods: Qualitative research interviews of 28 relatives of residents at six participating nursing homes in Scandinavia. The results derive from analysis of the interviews using Kvale's three levels of interpretation; self-understanding, common sense and a theoretical understanding.

    Results: The following themes emerged, from the perspective of the relatives, concerning what was deemed important to the resident according his existential needs and concerns: a). To have a comfortable, homely and practical room. b). To have close contact with family, friends and with the staff. c).To have aesthetic needs and concerns attended to. d). To have ethical needs and intrinsic values attended to. e). To have cultural and spiritual needs and concerns attended to.

    Conclusion: The results provide more substance to the theme and are all important in terms of the residents' feeling of worthiness and dignity. In general it seemed that the relatives experienced a positive encounter with the staff, but it was also mentioned that staff members were not confronted about episodes that were undignified and disgraceful. This could be a sign or expression that they were worried that negative responses or complaints could lead to a kind of reprisal against the resident and to indignity.

  • 30.
    Edlund, Margareta
    et al.
    Åbo Academy University, Finland.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    von Post, Irene
    Åbo Academy University, Finland.
    Lindström, Unni
    Åbo Academy University, Finland.
    Concept determination of human dignity2013In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 851-860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents findings from an ontological and contextual determination of the concept of dignity. Thestudy had a caritative and caring science perspective and a hermeneutical design. The aim of this studywas to increase caring science knowledge of dignity and to gain a determination of dignity as a concept.Eriksson’s model for conceptual determination is made up of five part-studies. The ontological and contex-tual determination indicates that dignity can be understood as absolute dignity, the spiritual dimension char-acterized by responsibility, freedom, duty, and service, and relative dignity, characterized by the bodily,external aesthetic dimension and the psychical, inner ethical dimension. Dignity exists in human beings bothas absolute and relative dignity.

  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, S-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Wigerblad, Ase
    Malardalen Univ, S-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Karlstad, Sweden..
    Undignified care: Violation of patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care from a nurse's perspective2014In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 176-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patient dignity in involuntary psychiatric hospital care is a complex yet central phenomenon. Research is needed on the concept of dignity's specific contextual attributes since nurses are responsible for providing dignified care in psychiatric care. The aim was to describe nurses' experiences of violation of patient dignity in clinical caring situations in involuntary psychiatric hospital care. A qualitative design with a hermeneutic approach was used to analyze and interpret data collected from group interviews. Findings reveal seven tentative themes of nurses' experiences of violations of patient dignity: patients not taken seriously, patients ignored, patients uncovered and exposed, patients physically violated, patients becoming the victims of others' superiority, patients being betrayed, and patients being predefined. Understanding the contextual experiences of nurses can shed light on the care of patients in involuntary psychiatric hospital care.

  • 32.
    Gustafsson, Lena-Karin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University.
    Wigerblad, Åse
    Mälardalen University.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Respecting dignity in forensic care: The challenge faced by nurses of maintaining patient dignity in clinical caring situations2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We must recognize the importance of increased understanding for maintaining patient dignity to expand earlier formulated knowledge about caring ethics. Illuminations of this topic can create conditions for changing and developing care, as well as making caregivers' preservation of dignity evident. The aim was to illuminate the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity in forensic care. A qualitative design with a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach was used to analyse and interpret focus group interviews with nurses in forensic care. In the text the meaning of maintenance of patient dignity was protection and respect but also brotherly humanity. Protection was shown outwards to cover or screen the patient and to guard against danger. The inner form was described as protecting the patients' needs and arousing the patients' protection resources. Respect was shown outwards to take the patient seriously and to show others that patients are to be reckoned with, inwards in teaching patients to create respect and in teaching patients to expect respect from others. Meeting patients with human brotherhood was shown in doing ‘the little extra’ and demonstrating human similarity. The new understanding will enable nurses to plan and provide professional care, based on caring science.

  • 33.
    Hoy, Bente
    et al.
    VIA University College, Denmark.
    Lillesto, Britt
    University of Nordland, Norway.
    Slettebo, Ashild
    University of Agder, Norway.
    Saeteren, Berit
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Heggestad, Anne Kari Tolo
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Caspari, Synnove
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Aasgaard, Trygve
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Lohne, Vibeke
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Raholm, Maj-Britt
    Sogn and Fjordane University College, Norway.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences (from 2013).
    Naden, Dagfinn
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Maintaining dignity in vulnerability: A qualitative study of the residents' perspective on dignity in nursing homes2016In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 60, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older people, living in nursing homes, are exposed to diverse situations, which may be associated with loss of dignity. To help them maintain their dignity, it is important to explore, how dignity is preserved in such context. Views of dignity and factors influencing dignity have been studied from both the residents' and the care providers' perspective. However, most of these studies pertain to experiences in the dying or the illness context. Knowledge is scarce about how older people experience their dignity within their everyday lives in nursing homes. Aim: To illuminate the meaning of maintaining dignity from the perspective of older people living in nursing homes. Method: This qualitative study is based on individual interviews. Twenty-eight nursing home residents were included from six nursing homes in Scandinavia. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by Ricoeur was used to understand the meaning of the narrated text. Results: The meaning of maintaining dignity was constituted in a sense of vulnerability to the self, and elucidated in three major interrelated themes: Being involved as a human being, being involved as the person one is and strives to become, and being involved as an integrated member of the society. Conclusion: The results reveal that maintaining dignity in nursing homes from the perspective of the residents can be explained as a kind of ongoing identity process based on opportunities to be involved, and confirmed in interaction with significant others.

  • 34.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Dignity of Nursing home residents.: - En klinisk studie med hensikt å fremme pasientens verdighet i sykehjem.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Omvårdnad vid kirurgiska sjukdomar2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Lindvall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    The dignity of nursing home recidents2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Att bevara den äldre patientens värdighet i samband med operation- ett samverkans projekt2010In: Uppdukat, ISSN 1101-5624, no 2, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Att förena teori och praxis- ett kliniskt vårdvetenskapligt applikationsprojekt2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Att göra det möjligt2008In: Psyklisten, 2008, 4, 14Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Att värna om den äldre människans värdighet i samband med kirurgiska ingrepp2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Body in a lifeworld perspective2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Clinical application research - an approach to the appropriation of caring science2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Clinical research: a hermeneutical approach with co-reseachers an element of application2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Considerations of human dignity in nursing2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Den perioperativa dialogen: en organisationsmodell för kontinuitet. s 142003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Den perioperativa vårdens kultur2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Den talande kroppen2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Den talande kroppen- en vårdvetenskaplig studie ur blivande sjuksköterskors perspektiv2001In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 16--20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Nursing.
    Ethical value conflics in perioperative nursing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindwall, Lillemor
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013).
    Etik och värdighet i den perioperativa vården2013In: Etik och värdighet i den perioperativa vården: - en teoretisk och klinisk förståelse, Oslo, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
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