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  • 1.
    Engwall, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Kaulio, Matti A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Miterev, Maksim
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Berlin, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Explorative project networks: Means for business model innovation?2018In: R&D Management Conference, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When facing business model innovation, a key challenge for incumbent firms is the redefinition of industry and organizational boundaries. Drawing on findings from three cases studies this article suggests that inter-organizational projects can be effective means for mobilizing distributed resources and capabilities in order to gain business model innovation. This empirical phenomenon is discussed and analysed in detail, and implications for future research are suggested. 

  • 2.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Conceptualizing artificial intelligence: A general purpose technology in innovation systems2018In: R&D Management Conference, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many signs indicating that artificial intelligence – reproduction of the cognitive functions that humans have such as learning and problem solving by machines– has been spreading among various industries. However, from a scholarly point of view, how artificial intelligence can be theoretically conceptualized still remains a challenging task. In this paper, we propose that artificial can be conceptualized as general purpose technology – a technology which opens up new opportunities rather than offering complete final solutions. Based on literature on the technological innovation systems and general purpose technologies, we support our proposition with a qualitative case study on artificial intelligence in Sweden. Drawing on the results of the case study, we derive implications for research on innovation systems as well as practitioners and policymakers.

  • 3.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of dynamic innovations: A case study of residential solar PV systems2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the literature on diffusion of innovations, it is widely known that the characteristics and socio-environmental settings of adopters do evolve in space and time. What about innovations themselves? During the diffusion process, don’t some innovations continuously alter in space and time? If so, how does the dynamic character of an innovation influence the diffusion process? In previous research, it has been often assumed that innovations do not continuously alter or get modified when diffusing from a source to potential adopters. This assumption may mean that the innovation is invariant as it diffuses in time and space—i.e., the innovation does not have a continuously dynamic character. Is it always the case in practice?   

    A single form of an innovation is not always necessarily compatible with the preferences, limitations, and residential settings of adopters. The innovation might appear in different forms when it diffuses in space and time, i.e., it is “dynamic”. This PhD thesis aims to explore how dynamic innovations diffuse in space and time—a relatively understudied topic in research. In doing so, it distinguishes between the diffusion of dynamic innovations and other kinds of innovations. Anchored on the case of diffusion of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, this thesis is composed of a cover essay and six appended papers. The first two appended papers are systematic literature reviews, aiming at understanding the state of the art of the theoretical and contextual research domains. The third paper is based on a case study in southern Germany and explores the diffusion of a dynamic innovation at adopter level. The fourth paper is empirically focused on a local firm’s business model, which is assumed to be a key to understanding the mechanism behind the diffusion of dynamic innovations. The fifth paper is based on lead market hypothesis and tries to explore the diffusion of innovations at the regional level. The sixth paper studies a semi-hypothetical case and offers an innovative method to forecast the diffusion of innovations in general.

    The contribution of this PhD thesis lies in three research dimensions: context, method, and theory. Firstly, the thesis takes the existing theories (e.g., diffusion of innovations theory and lead market hypothesis) and methods (e.g., case study) and applies them in different contexts of the diffusion of residential solar PV systems: the individual, sub-national, and national level. Secondly, it proposes a new research method, namely the finite element method for forecasting the diffusion of innovations, based on an existing theory (e.g., wave-like diffusion of innovations in time and space) and context (e.g., solar PV systems). Last but not least, the cover essay of this thesis takes the findings of the appended papers and employs an extension of theory of diffusion of innovations. In doing so, it includes the role of the dynamic characteristic of innovations that do alter in time and space during the diffusion process.

    Overall, the findings of this thesis indicate that the diffusion of dynamic innovations is different in nature, and continuous efforts of change agents are critical for enhancing the diffusion of such innovations. Change agents are especially important to help potential adopters to find out and develop the form of innovation that best fits their needs, limits, and preferences, which are heterogeneous in space and time. 

  • 4.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Finite Element Method for Forecasting the Diffusion of Photovoltaic Systems: Why and How?2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 163, p. 464-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) has been used in the broad field of continuum mechanics in engineering disciplines for several decades. However, recently, some scholars have attempted to apply the method to social science phenomena. What is the scope of using FEM in social science-related fields?  Anchored in the literature on social sciences, this paper, firstly, reviews the scope of using FEM in social science phenomena, and then applies FEM to a semi-hypothetical case study on the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in southern Germany.  By doing so, the paper aims to shed light on why and how the Finite Element Method can be used to forecast the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in time and space. Unlike conventional models used in diffusion literature, the computational model considers spatial heterogeneity. The model is based on a partial differential equation that describes the diffusion ratio of photovoltaic systems in a given region over time. The results of the application show that the FEM constitutes a powerful tool by which to study the diffusion of an innovation as a simultaneous space-time process.

  • 5.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Why general purpose technologies matter in innovation systems: The case of artificial intelligence in the mining and metal producing industry of Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are many signs indicating that artificial intelligence – reproduction of the cognitive functions that humans have such as learning and problem solving by machines– has been spreading among various industries. The rise of artificial intelligence – as this article conceptualize as a general purpose technology –   is affecting not only the cognitive dimension of technological innovation systems but also the organizational, institutional and economic dimensions. However, from a technological point of view, studies in technological innovation systems often focus on specific purpose technologies. What about general purpose technologies – which open up new opportunities rather than offering complete final solutions? In this paper, we aim to explore how a general purpose technology affects the innovation systems. In order to do so, we conduct a qualitative case study on artificial intelligence in mining and metal producing industry of Sweden. Our contribution is twofold. Firstly, we clarify how artificial intelligence can be conceptualized as a general purpose technology in innovation systems perspective. Secondly, we find out how a general purpose technology affects the dynamics of innovation systems.

  • 6.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Assbring, Linda
    KK-stiftelsen.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Exploring sustainability transitions in the iron and steel industry: A case study from Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The iron and steel industry accounts for one third of global industrial CO2 emissions (IEA, 2015a), putting transformative pressures on the industry to shift towards more sustainable modes of production.  Steel is widely used in every country and almost all industries, with a growing trend around the globe. There is a common agreement that the industry needs to improve the energy efficiency, recycle more and switch to low-carbon production processes (IEA, 2015a; Rynikiewicz, 2008; Sridhar and Li, 2016; WSA, 2016). However, this transitions requires a lengthy and complex process at which radical innovations are required to reduce the emissions and ,thus, facilitate the sustainability transitions (Wesseling et al., 2016).

    In this study, we focus on the iron and steel industry in Sweden – a rarely studied context in the field of sustainability transitions. The country is the host of SSAB AB, known to be a promising steel company to lead the sustainability transitions of the industry worldwide (Fryer et al., 2016), as well as the LKAB, which is the EU´s largest iron ore producer with 78% market share (LKAB, 2016). The SSAB and LKAB, together with the Swedish policy makers and Vattenfall – as electricity supplier –, committed themselves making Sweden to be the first place to reach zero-carbon steel production (PC, 2016). However, despite the ambitious goals, a few decades might be needed. For example, much is expected from the radical innovations, such as the hydrogen based reduction technology (HYBRIT, 2016), which are still at the experimental stage. Thus, we raise the following research question: What are the possible pathways for sustainability transitions in the iron and steel industry in Sweden? The case in Sweden is highly relevant for the field of sustainability transitions because there is a collective guidance and governance towards carbon free steel production (PR, 2017). As a method, we choose an explorative case study approach (Yin, 2003). We combine primary qualitative data, such as semi structured interviews, with secondary data, such as reports, papers and press materials. This data is used to discuss the possible transition pathways for the industry.

    Our case study relates to the ongoing research in sustainability transitions studies, especially in regards to the literature on technological innovation systems (Bergek et al., 2015; Hekkert et al., 2007; Walrave and Raven, 2016) and transitions pathways (Geels and Schot, 2007; Geels et al., 2016). On the one hand, the case of hydrogen based reduction technology demonstrates a combination of strengths and weaknesses of the functions in the innovation system. For instance, the knowledge exchange and guidance for research are significantly high, while the market formation is still at its very early stage. On the other hand, incumbent actors try to reorient themselves towards a new radical technology (i.e., hydrogen based reduction technology) which may lead to both a technical substitution and a reconfiguration of the system components. Thus, this case (initially) shows some characteristics from two distinct transition pathways: transformation and reconfiguration. Although the shifts between the pathways are recently discussed in the literature (Geels et al., 2016), an overlap between them is a relatively new phenomenon which needs further investigation. 

  • 7.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of eco-innovations: A review2014In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 33, no May, p. 392-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature in the field of eco-innovations often focuses on policy, regulations, technology, market and firm specific factors rather than diffusion. However, understanding of diffusion of eco-innovations recently has gained more importance given the fact that some eco-innovations are already at a mature stage. This paper aims to clarify the concept of diffusion of eco-innovation and provide a current overview of this emerging literature. Within this review framework, we identify the most cited relevant publications and corresponding research streams. We also describe the strengths and limitations of these research streams in the concept of diffusion of eco-innovations. The results summarize insights from different research streams in different disciplines and outline an entry point for researchers new to the emerging field of diffusion of eco-innovations.

  • 8.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Diffusion of eco-innovations: Exploring the literature2013In: IAMOT2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the importance of the management of eco-innovations has been growing, more in practice than in academia. However, although in the literature there are already some evidences focussed on management of eco-innovations, there is no comprehensive review on the knowledge base of diffusion of eco-innovations. This paper provides a current overview of the existing body of literature, identifying the most active scholars and relevant publications in this field, and deepening in the major disciplines and research streams. Results show that the theory of diffusion of innovations which provided the philosophical underpinnings of how innovations are diffused is not the main knowledge base to explain the diffusion of eco-innovations. Lead market hypothesis, sustainable transitions and the ecological modernization appear as the initial base of the cognitive platform that can contribute to the understanding of diffusion of eco-innovations.

  • 9.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Motivators for adoption of photovoltaic systems at grid parity: A case study from Southern Germany2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 43, p. 1090-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some countries, photovoltaic (PV) technology is at a stage of development at which it can compete with conventional electricity sources in terms of electricity generation costs, i.e., grid parity. A case in point is Germany, where the PV market has reached a mature stage, the policy support has scaled down and the diffusion rate of PV systems has declined. This development raises a fundamental question: what are the motives to adopt PV systems at grid parity? The point of departure for the relevant literature has been on the impact of policy support, adopters and, recently, local solar companies. However, less attention has been paid to the motivators for adoption at grid parity. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the diffusion of PV systems, explaining the impact of policy measures, adopters and system suppliers. Anchored in an extensive and exploratory case study in Germany, we provide a context-specific explanation to the motivations to adopt PV systems at grid parity.

  • 10.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Social sciences and the mining sector: some insights into recent research trends2018In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 58, no October 2018, p. 257-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of science publications is growing exponentially, thus increasing the need for understanding the knowledge base of various research streams and their emerging branches. From a social science perspective, the literature on the mining sector – the industrial sector that extracts ores and minerals from the ground – has also witnessed steady growth. However, this literature is rather fragmented in regards to the thematic topics and the geographical focus. To respond to this, this paper offers a systematic literature review of the social science research on the mining sector. The publication database of this review includes a set of 483 systemically selected papers from 976 authors, covering empirical research conducted in 73 countries from 5 continents: Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and America. Our contribution is twofold. Firstly, we provide an analysis of the geography of the research in terms of both authorship and empirical focus. In terms of the geographical coverage of the empirical cases, Australia appears as the most studied country in the field, followed by countries in other regions such as Asia (China, India, Russia and Turkey), Africa (Ghana, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of the Congo), North America (the USA and Canada), Latin America (Brazil and Chile) and Europe (Poland, Spain and Sweden). However, this dispersion is not reflected in the geographical coverage of the affiliations of the authors. Secondly, we identify the most popular social science research topics on the mining sector. Our results show that the social science research on the mining sector shifted from the traditional research streams (e.g., industrialisation and growth, colonialization, technological and economic development, and the resource curse) to the new streams of research on social, environmental and economical sustainability (e.g., the social license to operate, corporate social responsibility, criticality of the rare earth elements, material flow analysis and environmental impacts). Overall, our study serves as an entry point for researches who are interested in social science research on the mining sector.

  • 11.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Assbring, Linda
    KK-stiftelsen, Sweden.
    Potential transitions in the iron and steel industry in Sweden: Towards a hydrogen-based future?2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 195, p. 651-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The iron and steel industry accounts for one third of global industrial CO2emissions, putting pressure on the industry to shift towards more sustainable modes of production. However, for an industry characterised by path dependency and technological lock-ins, sustainability transitions are not straightforward. In this study, we aim to explore the potential pathways for sustainability transitions in the iron and steel industry. To do so, we have conducted a case study in Sweden where there are policy and industry commitments towards fossil-free steel production. Our theoretical points of departure are the technological innovation system (TIS) approach and the multi-level perspective (MLP), and our paper presents the dynamics behind an emerging case of transition towards a hydrogen-based future. The paper has two major contributions to the literature on sustainability transitions. First, it attempts to borrow some concepts from the MLP and integrate them with the TIS approach. Second, it empirically presents an in-depth case study of the iron and steel industry – an understudied context in the field of sustainability transitions. By doing so, it sheds some light on the dynamics between an emerging TIS and potential transition pathways of a regime.

  • 12.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Barbara, Breitschopf
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Lead markets at sub-national levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on lead markets has long argued that the global diffusion of innovations is often driven by country-specific attributes of a lead country. However, less attention has been paid to the sub-national level. Can region-specific attributes of a lead region drive the national diffusion? The paper takes the lead market model and applies it in a sub-national context.  Based on spatiotemporal data and an extensive case study on diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in Germany, this paper identifies the presence of both lead and lag markets at the sub-national level. Our findings indicate that the lead market model of the international diffusion of innovations is also applicable in a national context. 

  • 13.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Breitschopf, B
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Spatial Dimension of Lead Markets: Evidences from Diffusion of Photovoltaic Systems in Germany2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion of innovations is a spatial process. Spatial conditions and demand preferences may inducecreation of spatial lead markets before national and international adoptions take place. This paper aimsto extend the Lead Markets concept in a spatial dimension, considering local differences. We firstlydiscuss theoretical underpinnings of the spatial dimension of Lead Markets concept and then apply theconcept to the case of photovoltaic systems’ diffusion in Germany. Based on spatial data and anextensive case study, we show how an innovation is deployed in local areas of a country before beingadopted nationwide. We also apply the system of lead market attributes (demand, price, export,transfer and market structure advantages) to the case and discuss how a local lead market could takeoff in a particular region of a country. Our findings have significant implications not only in theory butalso for practice, providing recommendations for policy makers who seek to enhance the level ofdiffusion for particular innovations.

  • 14.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Breitschopf, Barbara
    Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, Germany.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Sub-national lead markets: The diffusion of photovoltaic systems among households in Germany2017In: Academy of Management Proceedings, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on lead markets has long argued that the global diffusion of innovations is often driven by the country-specific attributes of a lead country. However, less attention has been paid to the sub-national level. Can region-specific attributes of a lead region drive national diffusion? This paper takes the lead market model and applies it to the diffusion of photovoltaic systems among households in Germany. Based on an indicator-based approach, our paper identifies the presence of both lead and lag markets at the sub-national level. Our findings show the importance of the lead market characteristics (i.e., demand, cost, export, transfer and market advantages) of early adopter sub-national regions as critical drivers of the national diffusion of innovations. This is particularly important for policymakers seeking to influence the diffusion of environmental innovations through institutional support. If a national policy can drive the diffusion of an innovation in a specific sub-national region that has lead market attributes, the diffusion in other regions is likely to follow the lead region subsequently. 

  • 15.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Business Model Challenge: Learnings from a Local Solar Company in Germany2014In: Ist European Doctorate in Industrial Management conference, 2014, p. 23-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain.
    Business model challenge: Lessons from a local solar company2016In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 85, p. 1026-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar photovoltaic systems are considered vital renewable energy sources for mitigating climate change and reducing dependency on fossil fuels. However, in some countries, the diffusion rate of photovoltaic systems is decreasing. A case in point is Germany, the country with the highest installed capacity of photovoltaic systems. Given the new conditions in the German market, the diffusion rate continuously declined in both 2012 and 2013. Whether the diffusion rate will again take off is not known. While the recent literature has pointed out that local solar companies have a vital driving role in diffusion, not many studies have yet discussed the business models and challenges such local companies may have. Through an extensive case study, this paper explores the business model of a local solar company in a town of 43,000 habitants in Southern Germany. The case of this company tells about an important business model challenge. Overcoming such challenges may not only let the company survive but also drive the diffusion of solar photovoltaic systems in the region. The results include implications for both industrial actors and policymakers.

  • 17.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Hidalgo, Antonio
    Modelling the Diffusion of Photovoltaic: Concepts and Applications2013In: IAMOT2013 Proceedings, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Sriwannawit Lundberg, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Diffusion of Innovations2016In: A Dynamic Mind: Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius / [ed] Pär Blomkvist; Petter Johansson, Stockholm: Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics , 2016, p. 151-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do innovations diffuse in societies and organizations? It is an interesting yet a complex question to answer. In order to shed some lights on this fundamental question, this book chapter provides the foundations of diffusion of innovations theory along with two empirical cases.

    The theory is discussed through a three-component model of diffusion: innovation, sources and adopters. It mainly builds upon the seminal work of the well-known sociologist and communication scholar, Everett Rogers (1962).

    The empirical cases are based on diffusion of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The first case is about off-grid solar PV systems in Bangladesh, while the second case is about on-grid solar PV systems in Germany.Overall, the differences and similarities between the two case studies in developing and developed countries let us explain how the characteristics of innovation, sources and adopters affect the diffusion of innovations.

  • 19.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Barriers to the adoption of photovoltaic systems: The state of the art2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 49, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although photovoltaic (PV) systems have become much more competitive, the diffusion of PV systems still remains low in comparison to conventional energy sources. What are the current barriers hindering the diffusion of PV systems? In order to address this, we conducted an extensive and systematic literature review based on the Web of Science database. Our state-of-the-art review shows that, despite the rapid development and maturity of the technology during the past few years, the adoption of PV systems still faces several barriers. The wide adoption of PV systems—either as a substitute for other electricity power generation systems in urban areas or for rural electrification—is a challenging process. Our results show that the barriers are evident for both low- and high-income economies, encompassing four dimensions: sociotechnical, management, economic, and policy. Although the barriers vary across context, the lessons learned from one study can be valuable to others. The involvement of all stakeholders—adopters, local communities, firms, international organizations, financial institutions, and government—is crucial to foster the adoption.

  • 20.
    Susur, Ebru
    et al.
    Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain) & Politecnico di Milano (Italy).
    Karakaya, Emrah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    A critique on the 'sustainability' assumption of the sustainability transitions literature2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research on sustainability transitions (ST) addresses the global sustainability challenges, underlying the importance of radical innovations in a systemic way. However, as we argue, the ST scholars tend to use the term “sustainability” without proper justification and operationalisation, often implicitly assuming that the studies empirical cases contribute to sustainability. To address this, our paper analyses this in-house assumption in the ST community and critically questions it. To bring this forward, we address the following questions (I) What ways of inquiry are likely to facilitate the development of reflections on the sustainability assumptions underlying the empirical cases in the ST literature?  (II) To which extent do the ST scholars reflect on the sustainability assumptions underlying the empirical cases they study, as expressed in their research texts?  To address these questions, we revisit the extant literature, propose a framework of six dimensions and, in turn, apply this framework on a number of systematically selected ST cases. Our study shows that the ST scholars don’t always reflect on to which extent the focal cases contribute to the transitions towards more sustainable modes of production and consumption. The alternative sustainability solutions are often overlooked; the sustainability-effects beyond the empirical boundaries are not always reflected; and trade-offs of the focal case’s contributions on (social, economic and environmental) sustainability are mostly not taken into account. Thus, we argue for the necessity of a reflexive inquiry on the future empirical studies of the ST field, as we name it case “sustainabilitiness”. If taken as a methodological tool, the proposed case “sustainabilitiness” framework suggests the primary dimensions which may be applied for the case selection, analysis and interpretation in future ST studies.

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