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  • 1.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    university College of Opera, Sweden.
    Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interestingchallenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists andperformers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participantsare relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in definingand refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper wepresent strategies for structuring the development process, basedon iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are describedin theory and examples are given of how they have been successfullyapplied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototypingand this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relateto a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument calledThe Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed,and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus ofthese cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualizetechnology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it anew role to play.

  • 2.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, France .
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping "The Throat V3"for the elephant man opera2011In: Proceedings of the 8th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Padova, Italy: Padova University Press , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process.In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations.The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 3.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH Stockholm.
    Unander-Scharin, Asa
    Lunds universitet.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads2017In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

  • 4.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Singing Interaction: Embodied Instruments for Musical Expression in Opera2014In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 24, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the opera Sing the Body Electric! A Corporatorio, artists from the disciplines of opera, dance and the development of new musical instruments collaborated to create an onstage fusion of different technologies and artistic practices that connected performer, scenography and instrument. Gestures and movements of singers were captured by custom-built technologies. The singers also used custom-built technologies for transforming their vocal qualities and for creating synthesized accompaniment in real time. In this way the singers’ bodily musical processes further extended their vocal performances, rooted in operatic praxis, allowing for heightened expressivity and emergent scenic subjects.

  • 5.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Which Scenic Subjects may Emerge when Interacting With Machines Through Vocal and Bodily Virtuosity?2016In: Proceedings of CARPA4: Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts / [ed] Annette Arlander, Theatre Academy Helsinki , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    New Scenic Subjects: Explorations of a System of Autonomous On-Stage Observers2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 265-268Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad universitet.
    Uncanny materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads2017In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Trichon, Vincent
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad universitet.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Höök, Kristina
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Dancing With Drones: Crafting Novel Artistic Expressions Through Intercorporeality2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interactions are gaining traction, requiring a better understanding of how such expressions are shaped by designers. Through an analysis of an artistic process aimed to deliver a commissioned opera where custom-built drones are performing on stage alongside human performers, we observed the importance of achieving an intercorporeal understanding to shape body-based emotional expressivity. Our analysis reveals how the choreographer moves herself to: (1) imitate and feel the affordances and expressivity of the drones' 'otherness' through her own bodily experience; (2) communicate to the engineer of the team how she wants to alter the drones' behaviors to be more expressive; (3) enact and interactively alter her choreography. Through months of intense development and creative work, such an intercorporeal understanding was achieved by carefully crafting the drones' behaviors, but also by the choreographer adjusting her own somatics and expressions. The choreography arose as a result of the expressivity they enabled together.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå University of Technology, Piteå, Sweden.
    Trichon, Vincent
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dancing with drones: Crafting novel artistic expressions through intercorporeality2019In: CHI 2019: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Movement-based interactions are gaining traction, requiring a better understanding of how such expressions are shaped by designers. Through an analysis of an artistic process aimed to deliver a commissioned opera where custom-built drones are performing on stage alongside human performers, we observed the importance of achieving an intercorporeal understanding to shape body-based emotional expressivity. Our analysis reveals how the choreographer moves herself to: (1) imitate and feel the affordances and expressivity of the drones’ ’otherness’ through her own bodily experience; (2) communicate to the engineer of the team how she wants to alter the drones’ behaviors to be more expressive; (3) enact and interactively alter her choreography. Through months of intense development and creative work, such an intercor- poreal understanding was achieved by carefully crafting the drones’ behaviors, but also by the choreographer adjusting her own somatics and expressions. The choreography arose as a result of the expressivity they enabled together.

  • 10.
    Unander-Scharin, Asa
    et al.
    Lulea Univ Technol, S-97187 Lulea, Sweden..
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies.
    Robocygne Dancing Life into an Animal-Human-Machine2016In: Leonardo: Journal of the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology, ISSN 0024-094X, E-ISSN 1530-9282, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 213-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robocygne is an artistic project that revolves around the development of a custom-built robotic bird, dancing to a remix of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake. The artists created the choreography through a process in which movements were danced into the robot by the choreographer's manipulation of the bird's limbs, by hand, to the music. To enable this multitracking procedure, the artists, in collaboration with the engineers, developed novel software that allowed overlying recording of motions in synchronization with an audio track. From an artistic perspective, the authors discuss the search for choreographic and musical qualities and emphasize how material aspects of body and technology interrelate with emotional expression in Robocygne.

  • 11.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Stockholm University of the Arts, University College of Opera. KTH, Skolan för datavetenskap och kommunikation (CSC), Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Extending Opera - Artist-led Explorations in Operatic Practice through Interactivity and Electronics2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we re-empower opera singers, extending their control over accompaniment and vocal expressivity? To answer this question, I have opened a novel design space, Extending Opera, consisting of interactive artist–operated tools to be used on-stage. The research has its methodological groundings in Research through Design (RtD) and Research through the Arts (RttA). This particular method is coined "research-throughthe- art-form-opera" – as I have worked within the realms and traditions of opera, probing its boundaries by designing, researching and creating through its own artistic toolbox.

    Originally conceived for personal use, the artifacts were later used by other singers and incorporated in performances of opera in small and large scale. By composing and designing for the requirements in operatic productions, high demands on robustness were explored in and through custom-built interfaces.

    The work resulted in ten novel artifacts and performances exploring the expressivity of these tools. Extending Opera is guided by and probed through three questions:

    1. How can the design and creation of interactive, artist-operated instruments be informed by deep musical knowledge and be probed by the particular conditions surrounding an operatic production?

    2. What impact can interactive, artist-operated instruments have on the opera singers themselves and on their vocal technique?

    3. How can interactive, artist-operated instruments empower opera singers, thus challenging contemporary power hierarchies – thereby reconnecting to the explorative practice in opera's early days?

    My knowledge contribution has surfaced through artistic practice and consists of the exemplars and the artworks, as well as three abstractions – one procedure, one requirement and one experiential quality.

    Sensory Digital Intonation highlights how the fine-tuning of technologies and real-time interactivity is incorporated in a feed-back loop with artistic concerns and creativity.

    Performative Stamina ("The Premiere-Factor") highlights how the traditional procedures leading up to a premiere in opera influence the demands on robustness and reliability within the components and the overall design of the novel artifacts.

    Vocal Embodiment is an experiential quality that describes how the interactive artifacts change the singing itself.

    In the conclusion, Artistic Re–Empowerment is discussed, proposing that power structures in opera have been probed through the use of the novel artist-operated interactive instruments.

  • 12.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. University College of Opera, Sweden.
    Extending Opera - Artist-led Explorations in Operatic Practice through Interactivity and Electronics2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How can we re-empower opera singers, extending their control over accompaniment and vocal expressivity? To answer this question, I have opened a novel design space, Extending Opera, consisting of interactive artist–operated tools to be used on-stage. The research has its methodological groundings in Research through Design (RtD) and Research through the Arts (RttA). This particular method is coined "research-throughthe- art-form-opera" – as I have worked within the realms and traditions of opera, probing its boundaries by designing, researching and creating through its own artistic toolbox.

    Originally conceived for personal use, the artifacts were later used by other singers and incorporated in performances of opera in small and large scale. By composing and designing for the requirements in operatic productions, high demands on robustness were explored in and through custom-built interfaces.

    The work resulted in ten novel artifacts and performances exploring the expressivity of these tools. Extending Opera is guided by and probed through three questions:

    1. How can the design and creation of interactive, artist-operated instruments be informed by deep musical knowledge and be probed by the particular conditions surrounding an operatic production?

    2. What impact can interactive, artist-operated instruments have on the opera singers themselves and on their vocal technique?

    3. How can interactive, artist-operated instruments empower opera singers, thus challenging contemporary power hierarchies – thereby reconnecting to the explorative practice in opera's early days?

    My knowledge contribution has surfaced through artistic practice and consists of the exemplars and the artworks, as well as three abstractions – one procedure, one requirement and one experiential quality.

    Sensory Digital Intonation highlights how the fine-tuning of technologies and real-time interactivity is incorporated in a feed-back loop with artistic concerns and creativity.

    Performative Stamina ("The Premiere-Factor") highlights how the traditional procedures leading up to a premiere in opera influence the demands on robustness and reliability within the components and the overall design of the novel artifacts.

    Vocal Embodiment is an experiential quality that describes how the interactive artifacts change the singing itself.

    In the conclusion, Artistic Re–Empowerment is discussed, proposing that power structures in opera have been probed through the use of the novel artist-operated interactive instruments.

  • 13.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    The Eternal Body of Man is the Imagination2011Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inför den andra konserten i serien har Drottningholms Barockensemble med stöd av Statens Kulturråd inlett ett samarbete med tonsättaren Carl Unander Scharin som resulterat i stycket The Eternal Body of Man is the imagination – a time capsule, specialskrivet för ensemblens 40-årsjubileum.

     

    ”Det är en stor glädje att få komponera ett verk till mina vänner och kollegor i Drottningholms Barockensemble och deras förnämliga musikkonst” säger Carl Unander Scharin, som även kommer dirigera stycket vid uruppförandet i Engelbrektskyrkan.

     

    Inspirationen har Carl Unander Scharin hämtat från rymdsonden Voyager II som skickades ut ur Solsystemet på 1970-talet, innehållande ”The Golden Record” – en guldpläterad LP-skiva som ska kunna spelas av en eventuell avlägsen civilisation med den medföljande grammofonen.

     

    ”Mänskligheten har många gånger återvänt till tanken om en tidskapsel, drömmen om att kommunicera från en tid till en annan. På sätt och vis är varje bok, varje konstverk, varje artefakt en ’Time Capsule’. I verket The Eternal Body of Man is the imagination, vill jag med de gamla instrumenten kommunicera med nutiden, och därmed med framtiden. Verket är tänkt som en fanfar som famlar över tid och rum” berättar Carl Unander Scharin.

     

    Titeln kommer från en rad av poeten, mystikern och konstnären William Blake (1757-1827). Verket har tre delar, som följer tankebanan från jordeytan, via avfärden, till konstens luftiga rymd. Uppgiften att skriva  för barockensemble var en speciell utmaning för tonsättaren.

     

    ”De tidiga instrumenten kan sakna vissa möjligheter i tonregister och dynamisk bredd som deras moderna varianter har. Å andra sidan har de en ursprunglig och mer avskalad klang. För att till exempel få tillgång till ett större antal skaltoner för naturtrumpeterna, valde jag att skriva för en C-trumpet och för en D-trumpet" avslutar Carl Unander Scharin. 

  • 14.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The throat III: disforming operatic voices through a novel interactive instrument2013In: Proceedings of CHI 2013 Extended Abstracts, ACM Press, 2013, p. 3007-3010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Practitioner-led artistic research, combined with interactive technologies, opens up new and unexplored design spaces. Here we focus on the creation of a tool for opera-singers to dynamically disform, change and accompany their voices. In an opera composed by one of the authors, the title-role singer needed to be able to alter his voice to express hawking, coughing, snuffling and other disturbing vocal qualities associated with the lead role Joseph Merrick, aka "The Elephant Man". In our designerly exploration, we were guided by artistic experiences from the opera tradition and affordances of the technology at hand. The resulting instrument, The Throat III, is a singer-operated artefact that embodies and extends particular notions of operatic singing techniques while at the same time creating accompaniment. It therefore becomes an emancipatory tool, putting a spotlight on some of the power hierarchies between singers, composers, conductors, and stage directors in the operatic world.

  • 15.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Artificial Body Voices2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Artificial Body Voices, 25-27 november 2011 Studio Acusticum i Piteå

     

    I Artificial Body Voices stiger publiken in i en mytopoetisk värld för att möta fantasieggande hybridvarelser, en dansande robotsvan, pulserande musik, underskön sång, en interaktiv röstmaskin och tretton dansare omslutna av videoanimationer som slingrande rör sig över väggar och golv. Vi vill inbjuda publiken till ett lekfullt experimentarium som undersöker människans längtan och drift att med teknologin omskapa, förändra och förlänga sina kroppsliga och röstliga förmågor.

  • 16.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Excerpts from the artistic process of Artificial Body Voices2011In: Artistic Research in Action: Proceedings of Carpa 2 - colloquium on Artistic Research in performing arts / [ed] Annette Arlander, Helsinki: Theatre Academy, Helsinki , 2011, p. 95-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial Body Voices is a scenic complex that explores the human desire to transform our bodies and connect to technology. Through stimulation rather than simulation this project will invite the audience to an artistic experiment connecting choreography, robotics, music, electro acoustics, vocal art, video and computer animation. This complex of bodies and voices will be developed in a process divided into a series of workshops, where the contributors share and transform the artistic material into new formats and combinations. In between the workshops the team re-cycles the material by enfolding and unfolding the material through our bodies, voices and computers.

  • 17.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Ombra mai fù: The interactive Singing Tree2010Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OMBRA MAI FÙ

    This sensual tree, built of copper, reacts on the closeness of the audience. When the audience approach, the tree performs the Largo by Handel with its trembling loudspeaker-leafs. In this aria, Xerxes gives voice to his love for a tree that allows him to seek refuge in its shadow.

     

     

  • 18.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Swanlake Revisited: An Interactive Exhibition2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under Oktober förvandlas Dansmuseets underjordiska rum till en mytopoetisk sjö där besökarens närvaro får märkliga svanvarelser att dyka upp och försvinna bland virtuella vågor. I Swanlake Revisited återbesöker vi den urgamla legenden om knölsvanen som lever sitt livi stumhet, men som vid dödsögonblicket en enda gång utbrister i oerhört vacker sång. 

  • 19.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Asplund, Lars
    Mälardalens Högskola .
    Robocygne: The Robotic Swan2010Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This trembling black robot swan which sometimes moves smoothly and gently, sometimes in a dramatic and fiery manner to Tchaikovsky´s majestic music is inspired by Edgar Degas’ sculpture The little fourteen year old dancer (1881), and is made from wax, bobbinet and silk ribbon.  This birdlike body vibrates with electronic life and has the unattainable dream of dancing as prima ballerina on a grand stage.  The music is a re-modelling of Rothbart’s theme from the Swan lake where both the ocean and the orchestra have been caressed and yet at the same time smacked by music technology.

  • 20.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Opera Mecatronica: An interactive exhibition within artistic research2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Vocal Chorder: Empowering opera singers with a large interactive instrument2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1001-1010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With The Vocal Chorder, a large interactive instrument to create accompaniment, opera singers can get more power over the performance. The device allows performers to interactively accompany themselves through pushing, leaning on and bending steel wires. The design was guided by the unique needs of the solo-singer, explored through autobiographical design and material explorations, some on stage, and later tested by other singers. We discuss how designing for opera and for the stage requires extraordinary durability and how opera performances can change with a bodilyoriented instrument such as The Vocal Chorder. Through a designerly exploration, we arrived at a device that offered (1) a tool for singers to take control over the rhythmical pace and overall artistic and aesthetic outcome of their performances, (2) an enriched sense of embodiment between their voice and the overall performance; and (3) a means to empower opera singers on stage.

  • 22.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interacting with the Vocal Chorder: Re-empowering the Opera Diva2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With The Vocal Chorder, a large interactive instrument to create accompaniment, opera singers can get more power over the performance. The device allows performers to interactively accompany themselves through pushing, leaning on, and bending steel wires. The design was guided by the unique needs of the solo-singer, explored through autobiographical design and material explorations on stage, and later tested by other singers. Through our designerly exploration, we arrived at a device that offered (1) a tool for singers to appropriate and take control over the rhythmical pace and overall artistic and aesthetic outcome of their performances, (2) an enriched sense of embodiment between their voice and the overall performance; and (3) a means to empower opera singers on stage.

  • 23.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås.
    Olimpia: A giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette with new coloratura music.2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    OLIMPIA

    The puppet Olimpia’s virtuoso coloratura aria is performed by a giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette built from highly patinated scrap machine parts. The music is ‘coloratura’ in its original sense – coloured or embellished – and implies a re-colouring of Offenbach’s aria from “The tales of Hoffmann”. The choreography is both a response to Heinrich Kleist’s homage to the marionette (1810), ‘the most graceful of all dancers whose non self conscious movements simply obey the realm of purely mechanical forces’,  and yet at the same time it is a staging of an anorexic yearning for a body without skin, flesh or psyche.

     

    The marionette consists of nine body parts connected – via a string system – to 15 computer directed servo engines, attached to an aluminium frame in the ceiling. Marionette height 300 cm. Frame 240x240 cm2.

     

    Concept, choreography and movement programming: Åsa Unander-Scharin

    Puppet maker, electronics and software: Magnus Lundin

    Aria: Jaques Offenbach (from Les racontes d’Hoffmann, 1881)

    Singer: Jeanette Bjurling (recording: Lars-Göran Ehn)

    Music: Carl Unander-Scharin

    Light design: Anders Larsson

    Photo: Rune Ahlström

     

    First performance in the Reactor hall at The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, 2010

     

    Produced by Scen- och Sinnesproduktion, financial support by Längmanska kulturfonden and the Swedish Arts Grants Committee

  • 24.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet, Arts, communication and learning.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås.
    Olimpia: The choreographed electromechanic puppet, dancing to remixed and recomposed music2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The puppet Olimpia’s virtuoso coloratura aria is performed by a giant electro mechanically choreographed marionette built from highly patinated scrap machine parts. The music is ‘coloratura’ in its original sense – coloured or embellished – and implies a re-colouring of Offenbach’s aria from “The tales of Hoffmann”. The choreography is both a response to Heinrich Kleist’s homage to the marionette (1810), ‘the most graceful of all dancers whose non self conscious movements simply obey the realm of purely mechanical forces’,  and yet at the same time it is a staging of an anorexic yearning for a body without skin, flesh or psyche. 

  • 25. Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    et al.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sensory Digital Intonation2013In: the 3rd colloquium on artictic resarch in Performing arts, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory Digital Intonation. The impact of artistic intuition and experience when fine-tuning digital artefacts. Throughout the artistic practice of the authors and their collaborative works (eg Artificial Body Voices, Robocygne, The Lamentations of Orpheus, The Crystal Cabinet, Olimpia, The Pearlfishers and Ombra Mai Fu) the development phase that we now denominate Sensory Digital Intonation has evolved. In the proposed presentation at Carpa 3, we will elaborate on this and show examples of how this practice has been and is carried out.

  • 26.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, Medieteknik och interaktionsdesign, MID.
    Sensory Digital Intonation2013In: The impact of performance as research: Proceedings of CARPA3 - colloquium on artistic research in performing arts / [ed] Arlander, Annette, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory Digital Intonation. The impact of artistic intuition and experience when fine-tuning digital artefacts. Throughout the artistic practice of the authors and their collaborative works (eg Artificial Body Voices, Robocygne, The Lamentations of Orpheus, The Crystal Cabinet, Olimpia, The Pearlfishers and Ombra Mai Fu) the development phase that we now denominate Sensory Digital Intonation has evolved. In the proposed presentation at Carpa 3, we will elaborate on this and show examples of how this practice has been and is carried out.

  • 27.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Choreographer, Dancer, Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer, Creator, Singer)
    Karlstad universitet.
    Elblaus, Ludvig (Creator)
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Calligrammes2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commissioned by Swedish Radio

    The surrealistic poetry of Guillaume Apollinaire forms the background for the choral suite Calligrammes. The work was commissioned by the Swedish Broadcasting Union to be performed by The Swedish Radio Choir together with a dancer and a vocal soloist – all of which performed on custom-built digital musical instruments. These instruments have been developed by Åsa and Carl Unander-Scharin in collaboration with Ludvig Elblaus.  The innovative artefacts are created to allow for explorations of artistic interaction between physical movement, musical soundscapes and vocal performance.

     

    Performers:

    The Swedish Radio Choir

    Peter Dijkstra, Conductor

    - Carl Unander-Scharin, Composer, Opera singer, Professor

    - Åsa Unander-Scharin, Choreographer, Dancer, Professor

    - Ludvig Elblaus, Musician, Visual artist, PhD-candidate

  • 28.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer)
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Ingesund Acedemy of Music. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    Calligrammes - Un Oiseaux Chante2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer, Creator)
    Karlstad universitet.
    Elblaus, Ludvig (Creator)
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Il pleut/ Det regnar röster2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commissioned by Berwaldhallen, Swedish Radio

    Il Pleut/ It’s Raining Voices

     

    “It’s raining women’s voices” are the opening words of Guillaume Apollinaire’s poem Il Pleut/It’s Raining. In this interactive musical installation visitors themselves can let both men’s and women’s voices rain through the air.  

     

    The container filled with water that is exhibited in the foyer of the Berwald Hall has been specially constructed and functions concretely as a doorway to a sound world where Apollinaire’s poem is recreated through the visitor’s interaction with the surface of the water. 

     

    Raining voices and undulating sounds are heard if ripples disturb the surface of the water. The way the water is treated is reflected in the sounds that are created – gentle, harsh, dripping or sweeping: everything plays a part in the sound that is produced. 

     

    When the surface of the water is touched a kind of synthesis of sounds arises, since the actual sound of the water blends with a collage made up of sound material recorded during the process of composing Calligrammes. Carl Unander-Scharin, Åsa Unander-Scharin and Ludvig Elblaus thus give us a glimpse of the creative process that precedes a première. 

     

    In this interactive musical installation we can hear tonalities and text fragments from the compositional process. Together with the concrete sound of the water they create a kind of soundscape with which the visitor can interact.  

  • 30.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Choreographer, Dancer, Composer)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music, media and Theatre.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer, Singer)
    Karlstad universitet.
    ISAGEL-suite2019Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During spring 2019, we decided to create a new work based on Harry Martinsson´s long suite of poems, Aniara. This decision was informed by both the commission from the International Gothenburg Organ Academy and on the fact that we have been interested in Aniara during a long time. In 1956, Swedish poet Harry Martinsson wrote and published his overwhelming poetry suite that depicts a space ship that has lost is course, having left an earth devastated by war and environmental disaster. His audience was surprised to read this new kind of poetry by their beloved and quite rurally oriented poet. The poems formed the basis for the opera “Aniara” from 1959, with a libretto by Erik Lindegren and music by Karl-Birger Blomdahl. The opera was a huge success and toured internationally.

    In our adaption of Aniara, we chose the poems that depicts the female pilot Isagel. We wanted to find a way of picturing her relation to Mimaroben, a relation that is full of mutual respect and fascination for deep scientific thought as well as shared abhorrence for the cold, dark and lonely space outside of the ship. Also, they share concerns for the remaining few humans and their hopeless future in the vessel.

    The music is composed for tenor and organ as well as the combination of “Observer-system” and dance that we have developed for our artistic work. In our version of Aniara, the church organ is a metaphor for the “Mima” (today we would call that the computer), whereas the Observer system is a metaphor for the “Gopta”-table where Isagel carries out her work with the “Jender” curves. Today we would probably call those things the touchscreen and the machine code. We also make use of another of our systems “The Throat” in order to dynamically change and extend the voice of the singer.

    Furthermore, the music material is based on “astronomic tone series”, series of tones that are derived from astronomic numbers that can be discerned in Martinsson´s poem. Martinsson tells us that Aniara is headed for the Lyrae, far away. In 2015 – many years after Martinsson´s death – it was confirmed by Nasa that the planet Kepler 438 b in the Lyrae has a ESI (Earth similarity index) that is -0.88. This means that this planet, in fact, is the one with the closest similarity to Earth of all known planets yet. The Lyrae is 25.05 light years away from the Earth – and this number, together with other astronomic numbers, form the basis for the tonal series used in the work.

    Choreography, Music, Dance, Observer: Åsa Unander-Scharin

    Music, Tenor, Throat: Carl Unander-Scharin Organ: Hans Davidsson Alto: Amanda Flodin

    Baritone: Karl-Peter Eriksson The Observer system and The Throat system are developed by Åsa Unander-Scharin, Carl Unander-Scharin and Ludvig Elblaus. In the system, recordings by Åsa Unander-Scharin (viola da gamba), Carl Unander-Scharin (harpsichord), Dorota Siuda (violin) and Hans Davidsson (orgel), are heard.

  • 31.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer, Singer)
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Ingesund Acedemy of Music. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    ISAGEL-svit ur ”Aniara”: 1. Människan, askans konung (Tenor och Orgel)2. Doris land (Dansare, Observer)3. Själv har jag inget namn (Passacaglia, Tenor och Orgel)4. Den livligt sprattlande ingivelsen (Tenor, Dansare och Observer)5. Jag ska berätta vad jag hört om glas (Tenor och Orgel)6. Spjutet (Toccata, Dans, Orgel)7. Osynlig för vårt öga gled hon undan (Tenor, Orgel, Dansare, Observer)8. Det finns skydd för nästan allt (Alt, Tenor, Baryton, Orgel)2019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Creator)
    Karlstad universitet.
    Elblaus, Ludvig (Creator)
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Liens/Kopplingar2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commisioned by Berwaldhallen, Swedish Radio

    The interactive musical installation Liens consists of four cords that are stretched from floor to ceiling. By pulling the cords the visitors perform an audio-visual piece that is heard through the loudspeakers and is also projected as a moving image on the wall – a kind of Gesamtkunstwerk inspired by Apollinaire’s figurative poems, and in this specific case by the poem Liens. The sonic material includes voices that sing passages from this particular poem. 

     

    The cords are rolled up on cushioned wheels that can sense touch to an extremely high degree. This makes them an excellent instrument for exploring small, subtle nuances, both in sounds and in images. Smaller or larger movements thus produce a variety of effects in the musical and visual expression. 

  • 33. Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Composer)
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Artistic Studies (from 2013).
    Opera Mecatronica: Åsa and Carl Unander-Scharin Dance, robotics, opera, and digital musical instruments followed by discussions with Elias Arnér on art, science, and research2019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Singer)
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Education, Ingesund Acedemy of Music.
    Tenor parts in Hugo Alfvéns 4th symphony "Från Havsbandet" in Katarina Church, Sept 15, 20192019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa (Creator)
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Arts, Communication and Education, Music and dance.
    Elblaus, Ludvig (Creator)
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl (Creator)
    Karlstad universitet.
    Un oiseau chante/ En fågel sjunger2017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liens/ Bonds - Commisioned by Berwaldhallen, Swedish Radio

    In this interactive musical installation three sculptural figures observe those visitors that choose to catch the eye of these observers. The observers analyse the movements of the visitors and transform them into voices that alternately whisper, whistle and sing fragments from Apollinaire’s poem Un Oiseau Chante. 

     

    The sounds of the observers’ answers vary in character depending on the nature of the movements observed. Large, vigorous movements give the sound more energy compared to small, slow movements. Visitors will notice that their physical movements result in different sounds – which in turn influence the visitors’ physical actions. It is thus a physical-musical interaction, not a one-way communication.     

    If the camera eye of the observers cannot detect any movement they stop playing and singing.  

1 - 35 of 35
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