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  • 1.
    Apelmo, Elisabet
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Lund University.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kan stadsbors användning av IT bidra till ett hållbart samhälle?: En kunskapsöversikt.2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with everyday habits with environmental impacts in relation to the use of information and communication technology (ICT, colloquially referred to as IT).

    We raise issues related to a) how environmentally promising and problematic ‘ICT-practices’ in urban everyday life can be identified and b) how the potential for such practices to be transformed through the use of ICT can be assessed, and ultimately utilized, in the context of sustainable urban development.

    These issues we have addressed through reviewing case studies, reports etc. Case study examples showed how ICT is used, e.g. to streamline and inform, or to share resources, vehicles and other products.

    We discussed how it might be possible, from an environmental sociology perspective, to assess when and how ICT might serve as an enabling technology that enhances or replaces previous patterns of action. We also briefly included, and discussed, phenomena defined from more general sustainability science point of view, e.g. substitution, induction and rebound effects.

    An important starting point was that social structures both enable and limit specific patterns of action. The structures can only be said to exist, or be maintained, by people's actions and through their experience. Change occurs as a result of the dynamics between people's actions and the structures created by past actions. Social practices are constantly being reproduced, with additions of new elements, e g when ICT applications are put to new uses. Then patterns of social relations and systems might also change, for example in how we use energy, travel, consume or socialize during both work and leisure time.

    Our review indicates that the knowledge that partners of Centre for Sustainable Communications (CESC) currently have access to, is fragmented and with a bias towards certain types of sectors, and patterns of action. Environmentally promising practices are more researched than problematic ones. Furthermore, use of ICTs for e.g. commuting and monitoring household energy use is more researched than most other patterns of action involving use of ICTs. Research on e.g. leisure and entertainment in relation to the environment is very much absent from today’s body of knowledge (as it is defined and delimited in this report).

    As for how everyday practices might change towards increased environmental sustainability by the use of ICT, we have found the knowledge situation even more incomplete. This shows, however, that it is worthwhile for CESC researchers and partners to carry on searching and developing knowledge regarding this.

    Regarding what should be viewed as more promising respectively more problematic urban patterns of action, we have to some extent illuminated this by exemplifying international environmental sociological research that is useful for discussing social practices in relation to environmental impacts. We have exemplified how this can shed light on some of the case studies we found among the CESC researchers and partners. Based on environmental sociology we discussed in what ways city dwellers with high income account for the most environmentally problematic practices. Correspondingly, we discussed how inhabitants with low income – out of necessity–account for many promising practices. In relation to this we also briefly discussed how rebound effects should be seen as related to socio-economic position.

    Another kind of problematic aspect highlighted is that players responsible for introducing, trying out etc., new ICTs, seem to have a tendency to do this in own networks or among the urban middle class. This is problematic from a democratic point of view. In 2012, 1.2 million people in Sweden did very rarely, or not at all, use the internet in their homes. Detailed knowledge about this group's ICT related practices seems to be largely missing.  If representatives for these groups are not represented in environmental research there is a danger that they also become less visible in public debate of environmental and ICT issues.

    This means that different social positions imply different opportunities and constraints. What patterns of actions people take more or less part in is influenced by social structures, norms and regulations, the historical and the immediate context, but also by the individuals' previous experiences and knowledge. The understanding of how a change towards a more sustainable society could come about through use of ICT therefore requires knowledge of practices among the full socio-demographic range of city dwellers.

  • 2.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cupitt, Rebekah
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Meetings, practice and beyond: Environmental sustainability in meeting practices at work2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden , 2013, p. 159-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study shows how the employees at a large transnational telecom company understand and accommodate the implemented travel and meeting policies that regulate business communication. This involves looking at employee decisions on when, how and why to hold meetings. The subsequent understandings of meetings and their practice is formed through negotiation and the formation of a ‘social matrix of workplace communication (meetings)’(Bateson & Reusch 2009). This social matrix and its contexts are analysed from the perspective of environmental sustainability of office work practice. The basis for this is the recent implementation of company-wide restrictions on travel aiming to encourage the use of mediated meetings instead of travel for face-to-face meetings. Some issues that emerge are shared meanings of meetings, more specifically the perceived importance of the physical meeting in a workplace where telephone meetings were the norm. This shows that even if the technological possibilities for mediated meetings and by extension a more flexible work practice exist, they are not regarded as default but seen as complementary to conventional work practices. The need to find a balance in between mediated and physical meetings comes across as a recurring theme in both interviews and policy documents.  As a result the ongoing negotiation of which meetings are deemed necessary to be held in person and thereby requiring travel, is embedded within TeliaSonera employees' notions that face-to-face meetings are better and more efficient than mediated meetings. Subsequently the collective view that mediated meetings are not as successful as face-to-face meetings becomes a central to the character of workplace communication. This negotiation is carried out on an individual level as well as on a more organisational level. When carried out on an organisational level these negotiations occur in policy documents which can sometimes contradict employee perspectives and are equally subject to contextual factors (cf. Kogg 2002). Other related issues present in the empirical data are the blurring of the divide between work and home in relation to the changes in work practices and information and communication technology (ICT).

  • 3.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Cargo Bike Pool: A way to facilitate a car-free life?2014In: Resilience – the new research frontier. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference (ISDRC 2014) Trondheim 18-20 June 2014, Trondheim, 2014, p. 273-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planning for sustainable cities, there is a need to take into consideration alternative transportation modes and facilitate the use of these, for the types of trips that people tend to use cars for. One way to mitigate car dependency in everyday life could be by using a cargo bike for these types of trips.The purpose of this paper is to map in what ways a specific trial of providing access to a cargo bike pool in a housing association affected both people’s travel habits and how they reimagined the types of trips that could be done at all or done in another way in order to find car-free travel and transportation modes. In this paper we focussed on the residents who actually used the cargo bikes.This qualitative study shows that although many of the residents did indeed lead car-free everyday lives, they got the opportunity to do other types of trips that they had not even thought about beforehand or deemed too difficult to do without a car. The cargo bike proved to fit into the portfolio of sustainable travel modes that facilitate everyday transports. The way that trips are imagined has also changed, that is what a cargo bike can be used to in relation to car, regular bike and public transportation.Having access to a cargo bike through a vehicle pool means that the possibilities to live a car-free everyday life are facilitated and in the long run a sustainable transportation pattern is being put in place.

  • 4.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Liljenström, Carolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lådcyklar och bilfria vardagsliv2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to create an environmentally sustainable city people in it need to have reason and opportunity to adjust their everyday habits in line with the city's sustainable development. This report covers the habits in the form of everyday travel and transportation, such as grocery shopping. More specifically examined is how access to a cargo bike system could contribute to the ability to live car-free lives. The study was included as part of the larger project Innovative Parking for climate-smart cities. The residents of a housing association in Bagarmossen, one of Stockholm's southern suburbs, had access to a cargo bike pool with three cargo bikes that they were allowed to book and use as they wanted from April to November 2013. We asked ourselves how access to the cargo bike pool affected the residents' travel and transport habits in daily life.

    The quantitative part of the study showed that nearly 20% of households booked the bikes at one or more occasions and that 5% of households used bicycles 10 times or more during the study period. In common for those who used the bike frequently, according to the qualitative interviews, was a desire to live a car-free everyday life and that they had several different kinds of transportation needs. The cargo bikes have been used for outings and errands, i.e. both leisure and utility trips.

    Among the conditions for the cargo bike pool trial being successful, we found a positive attitude towards the cargo bike pool in the housing association - even among members themselves did not use the cargo bikes. We also found good conditions for cycling in the Bagarmossen vicinity and that the housing association decided to build on existing practices regarding the booking procedure. In addition, we discuss if the cargo bike pool trial could have been even more successful if the division of responsibility for bicycle maintenance and dissemination of information and instruction also would have been built on the association’s already established practices with particular task groups. Other issues linked to this were the importance of a thorough and consistent introduction of the cargo bikes and that the cargo bikes are placed in a visible place for the prospective users.

    Cargo bikes may not be for all residents, or suitable for every occasion, but we believe that if the above-mentioned lessons are taken into account the chances of a mobility service such as a cargo bike pool, reaching an optimum utilization rate are increased.

  • 5.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Åkerlund, Maria
    Getting there and back again: Commuting and ICT in six cities across the globe2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ericsson ConsumerLab performed a qualitative exploratory study of how people experience daily commuting in three different countries. This report aims to present the outcome of the study in such a way that the data can be useful for further analyses and studies of commuting in relation to ICT use and environmental sustainability. Based on the study’s findings this report will present analytical data on: i) how ICT can be linked to everyday travel in order to facilitate commuting from the user’s point of view; and ii) how ICT solutions can enable commuting in an environmentally more sustainable way.

    The study, which had an ethnographic approach, showed that in general, commuters would like their commuting time to be, or at least seem, as short as possible. The respondents spend hours commuting every week and often claim to consider it a waste of time. Regardless of means of transport, they would like to get the most out of their commuting time (working, socialising, relaxing etc.), which implies that there is a demand for further technological improvements in this area (voice recognition services in cars, privacy settings in public transport, connectivity in public transport, etc.). An aspect that adds to how people perceive their commuting time concerns the extent to which its duration is predictable – even if the time cannot be shortened, commuters at least want to know how much time they will spend on their daily commute, so that they can plan their day with more certainty.

    Irrespective of means of transport, two major frustrations for commuters are lack of flow and the presence and behaviour of other people. People seem to lack good real-time information enabling them to avoid interruptions in their commute and much of their frustration relates to poor infrastructure conditions and management. Frustration with other people derives from their conduct in traffic contributing to inconveniences, congestion or hazards, or from noise, smell or littering on public transport.

    The greatest motivators for commuting by car are a feeling of independence in relation to other people, schedule and choice of route, and the private space the car offers. This means that the car provides flexibility in terms of when and how people travel, while also providing a private space both mentally (“in the car you can do whatever you want”) and physically (“you don’t have to hustle with others on the bus or train”). The major frustration when commuting by car is the need to focus on driving, so drivers cannot utilise time as they would wish.

    People generally justify their choice of public transport by anti-car arguments, which include difficulty in finding a parking space at work, expensive parking, fear of driving, lack of driving licence etc., but can also motivate their choice as giving them ‘me-time’ without having to focus on driving. The major frustration with commuting by public transport is dependency on time schedules and the shortcomings of the public transport network. This is exacerbated by a lack of relevant information or available options. However, commuting can be improved in a variety of ways for car and public transport users with the help of ICT. From a sustainability perspective, it is important to exploit the potential of ICT solutions to facilitate more environmentally friendly practices.

    Many of the ICT (Information Communication Technology) solutions identified in this report require reliable access to the internet and/or mobile phone network. The mobile phone is currently the single most important internet device while commuting, thus perhaps being the point of departure for many of the solutions, such as travel planner, ticketing options, etc, but for car users mobile phone services need to be adapted through better in-car voice recognition technologies, since the focus needs to be on driving. Current information services could be more personalised and contextualised in order to better suit the individual driver and most of these ICT solutions and services are also applicable to public transport commuters, but an additional function for such commuters could be some kind of ‘emergency button’ on mobile phones to increase their sense of security in travel.

    Home office solutions are a way of avoiding the frustrations of commuting altogether. While working from home is regarded by some with ambivalence and is impossible for many, there are ways of refining these solutions.

  • 6. Ewert, Susanne
    et al.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Osäker eller nöjd: Kulturella aspekter på vardagens avfallspraktik2008Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    Arushanyan, Yevgenia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ljungren Söderman, Maria
    Sahlin, Jenny
    Stenmarck, Åsa
    Sundberg, Johan
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle.
    Forsfält, Tomas
    Guath, Mona
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 841-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: “Information”; “Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials”; “Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems”; “Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals”, “Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures”; and “Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services”. Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

  • 8.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Forsfält, Thomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    IVL.
    Stemarck, Åsa
    IVL.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olof
    IVL.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lunds Universitet.
    Regeringen måste satsa på resurseffektivt samhälle2013In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2013-04-01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regeringen förbereder en avfallspolitisk proposition. Den kommer förhoppningsvis att klargöra vem som ska ha ansvaret att samla in våra förpackningar. Men fokus borde också ligga på hur vi kan gå mot ett samhälle där resurser används så effektivt som möjligt, skriver forskare på miljöområdet.

  • 9.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (flyttat 20130630).
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Forsfält, Thomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet.
    Guath, Mona
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms).
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    IVL.
    Stemarck, Åsa
    IVL.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olof
    IVL.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys (fms).
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lunds Universitet.
    Regeringen måste satsa på resurseffektivt samhälle2013In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 2013-04-01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Regeringen förbereder en avfallspolitisk proposition. Den kommer förhoppningsvis att klargöra vem som ska ha ansvaret att samla in våra förpackningar. Men fokus borde också ligga på hur vi kan gå mot ett samhälle där resurser används så effektivt som möjligt, skriver forskare på miljöområdet.

  • 10.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Bilfria barnfamiljer i närförort och innerstad2007In: Bilder av framtidsstaden: Tid och rum för hållbar utveckling / [ed] Gullberg A, Eslöv: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Cultural Factors Behind the Extent of Daily Travel2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    När kommer bussen?: Realtidsinformation i mobilen via optiska taggar2010Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Stockholmarnas resvanor: mellan trängselskatt och klimatdebatt2008Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Suburban and Inner City Families with Children and No Car2011In: Images of the future city: Time and space for sustainable development / [ed] Mattias Höjer, Anders Gullberg, Ronny Pettersson, Dordrecht; London: Springer, 2011, p. 355-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Vad betydde försöket för stockholmarna?2008In: Stockholmsförsöket: En osannolik historia / [ed] Isaksson, Karolina, Stockholm: Stockholmia förlag, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Greger, Henriksson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    What did the Trial Mean for Stockholmers?2009In: Congestion Taxes in City Traffic: Lessons learnt from the Stockholm Trial / [ed] Gullberg, A., Isaksson, K., Stockholm: Nordic Academic Press, 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Greger, Henriksson
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Ewert, Susanne
    Uncertainty Regarding Waste Handling in Everyday Life2010In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 2799-2813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to our study, based on interviews with households in a residential area in Sweden, uncertainty is a cultural barrier to improved recycling. Four causes of uncertainty are identified. Firstly, professional categories not matching cultural categories—people easily discriminate between certain categories (e.g., materials such as plastic and paper) but not between others (e.g., packaging and “non-packaging”). Thus a frequent cause of uncertainty is that the basic categories of the waste recycling system do not coincide with the basic categories used in everyday life. Challenged habits—source separation in everyday life is habitual, but when a habit is challenged, by a particular element or feature of the waste system, uncertainty can arise. Lacking fractions—some kinds of items cannot be left for recycling and this makes waste collection incomplete from the user’s point of view and in turn lowers the credibility of the system. Missing or contradictory rules of thumb—the above causes seem to be particularly relevant if no motivating principle or rule of thumb (within the context of use) is successfully conveyed to the user. This paper discusses how reducing uncertainty can improve recycling.

  • 18.
    Henriksson, Greger
    Lunds universitet.
    Hållbart vardagsliv: Mer eller mindre energikrävande konsumtion2004Report (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Andersson, Maria
    Psykologiska Institutionen, Göteborgs Universitet.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Psykologiska Institutionen, Götebors Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Guath, Mona
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL - Svenska miljöinstitutet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Institutionen för Kulturvetenskaper, Lunds Universitet.
    Hållbar avfallshantering: utvärdering av styrmedel från ett psykologiskt och etnologiskt perspektiv2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom psykologi och etnologi studeras företeelser ur perspektiv som återfinns hos den enskilda individen samt i det lokala eller sociala sammanhanget. I studien har olika styrmedel bedömts från ett etnologiskt och psykologiskt perspektiv. Studien har därvid inneburit nya arbetsmetoder – i varken psykologi eller etnologi brukar man arbeta med att förutsäga hur olika medel (t.ex. styrmedel) påverkar människan, normalt arbetar man efter att beskriva hur människan upplever ett befintligt styrmedel. Nytt i arbetssättet är också att utvärdera styrmedlen i olika framtidsscenarier.

    De viktigaste slutsatserna om de studerade styrmedlen är enligt följande.

    Information är ett viktigt styrmedel, men bör främst ses i kombination med andra styrmedel. Information bör utformas så att den är anpassad för olika grupper, hellre än massutskick och glättiga kampanjer. Informationen bör vara både deklarativ (ge information om effekter och konsekvenser) och procedurell (beskriva hur man ska göra). Information är viktigast som styrmedel i de hållbara scenarierna, men är av betydelse i samtliga scenarier. Vad gäller verksamheter kan man skilja på information till företagsledningen och information till anställda.

    Styrmedlet ”Reklam ja tack” förväntas leda till minskad mängd pappersavfall och är lätt att förstå för hushållen. Styrmedlet är mest effektivt i de hållbara scenarierna. Styrmedlet bedöms verksamt även i scenariot regional marknad eftersom det då är större tryck på verksamheterna att föra ut sitt budskap.

    Negativ kemikaliemärkning bedöms vara ett effektivt styrmedel, och framför allt effektivare än positiv märkning. Negativ kemikaliemärkning bedöms också vara effektivt i alla scenarier.

    I styrmedlet viktbaserad avfallstaxa kan storleken på den rörliga delen av avfallstaxan påverka styrmedlets genomslagskraft. Viktbaserad avfallstaxa bedöms fungera bäst i de marknadsdrivna scenarierna där individen tar ett stort ansvar själv. I de hållbara scenarierna kan styrmedlet komma att upplevas negativ eftersom ansvaret för miljöfrågorna är mer överflyttade till staten från medborgarna.

    Miljödifferentierad avfallstaxa bedöms ge ytterst små styreffekter eftersom det med den givna utformningen kan vara svår att kommunicera med människorna. Med vissa ändringar skulle det däremot kunna bli kraftfullt.

    Utvecklade insamlingssystem bedöms leda till ökad källsortering i alla scenarier. Detta gäller både ökad fastighetsnära insamling och insamling i materialströmmar.

  • 20.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys .
    Andersson, Maria
    Psykologiska Institutionen, Göteborgs Universitet.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Psykologiska Institutionen, Götebors Universitet.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Guath, Mona
    KTH, Miljöstrategisk analys.
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL - Svenska miljöinstitutet.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Institutionen för Kulturvetenskaper, Lunds Universitet.
    Hållbar avfallshantering: utvärdering av styrmedel från ett psykologiskt och etnologiskt perspektiv2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom psykologi och etnologi studeras företeelser ur perspektiv som återfinns hos den enskilda individen samt i det lokala eller sociala sammanhanget. I studien har olika styrmedel bedömts från ett etnologiskt och psykologiskt perspektiv. Studien har därvid inneburit nya arbetsmetoder – i varken psykologi eller etnologi brukar man arbeta med att förutsäga hur olika medel (t.ex. styrmedel) påverkar människan, normalt arbetar man efter att beskriva hur människan upplever ett befintligt styrmedel. Nytt i arbetssättet är också att utvärdera styrmedlen i olika framtidsscenarier.

    De viktigaste slutsatserna om de studerade styrmedlen är enligt följande.

    Information är ett viktigt styrmedel, men bör främst ses i kombination med andra styrmedel. Information bör utformas så att den är anpassad för olika grupper, hellre än massutskick och glättiga kampanjer. Informationen bör vara både deklarativ (ge information om effekter och konsekvenser) och procedurell (beskriva hur man ska göra). Information är viktigast som styrmedel i de hållbara scenarierna, men är av betydelse i samtliga scenarier. Vad gäller verksamheter kan man skilja på information till företagsledningen och information till anställda.

    Styrmedlet ”Reklam ja tack” förväntas leda till minskad mängd pappersavfall och är lätt att förstå för hushållen. Styrmedlet är mest effektivt i de hållbara scenarierna. Styrmedlet bedöms verksamt även i scenariot regional marknad eftersom det då är större tryck på verksamheterna att föra ut sitt budskap.

    Negativ kemikaliemärkning bedöms vara ett effektivt styrmedel, och framför allt effektivare än positiv märkning. Negativ kemikaliemärkning bedöms också vara effektivt i alla scenarier.

    I styrmedlet viktbaserad avfallstaxa kan storleken på den rörliga delen av avfallstaxan påverka styrmedlets genomslagskraft. Viktbaserad avfallstaxa bedöms fungera bäst i de marknadsdrivna scenarierna där individen tar ett stort ansvar själv. I de hållbara scenarierna kan styrmedlet komma att upplevas negativ eftersom ansvaret för miljöfrågorna är mer överflyttade till staten från medborgarna.

    Miljödifferentierad avfallstaxa bedöms ge ytterst små styreffekter eftersom det med den givna utformningen kan vara svår att kommunicera med människorna. Med vissa ändringar skulle det däremot kunna bli kraftfullt.

    Utvecklade insamlingssystem bedöms leda till ökad källsortering i alla scenarier. Detta gäller både ökad fastighetsnära insamling och insamling i materialströmmar.

  • 21.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Why do we buy and throw away electronics?2014In: ISDRC 2014: Resilience - The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Paper 6d7 in Electronically published full papers , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Åkesson, Lynn
    Lund University.
    Environmental Policy Instruments Seen as Negotiations2012In: Negotiating Environmental Conflicts: Local communities, global policies / [ed] Gisela Welz, Franziska Sperling, Eva Maria Blum, Frankfurt am Main: Institut für Kulturanthropologie und Europäische Ethnologie , 2012, p. 83-105-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Gullberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT-based sub-practices in sustainable development of city transport2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How could use of ICTs make transport systems in large cities sustainable? To what degree would then everyday patterns of action, in which use of ICT is becoming increasingly integrated, be an effective force in such sustainable development? In this paper we use own and other ethnographic studies of how people travel and plan their travel in large Nordic cities and explore a couple of scientific articles built around scenarios of sustainable development of ICT-supported transport in large cities. In the scenarios the role of ICT was most prominently for travel planning, collective ownership and/or access to vehicles, payment systems and traffic management for environmental purposes. Two of the scenario articles were selected for a closer analysis. In the ethnographic material sub-practices, critical for transport in everyday life, were identified. The aim was to show if and how proposed solutions in the sustainability scenarios are possible and meaningful for urban dwellers to integrate into their everyday travel practice. We found that scenarios of this kind might benefit from being supplemented with certain components. We discuss how actors that currently develop traffic management, mobility and travel planning services are somewhat blind to some significant parts of the whole spectrum of relevant social practices. We also discuss how this could provide conditions for actors and stakeholders to highlight and facilitate sub-practices with ICT use and in line with sustainable development. We tentatively discuss and propose that authorities responsible for urban transport set goals for maintaining and spreading certain practices, related to sustainability impacts. In this way the development of everyday social practice among city residents could be supported as an effective force in the development of the city's transport system, specifically including the development of ICT in relation to transportation.

  • 24.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hagman, Olle
    Andreasson, Hakan
    Environmentally Reformed Travel Habits During the 2006 Congestion Charge Trial in Stockholm-A Qualitative Study2011In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 3202-3215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour.

  • 25.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    Södertörn University / School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies.
    A Day at the School of Opera: Less Travel throug Distance Education2013In: Nachhaltigkeit in der Wirtschaftskommunikation / [ed] Martin Nielsen, Iris Rittenhofer, Marianne Grove Ditlevsen, Sophie Esmann Andersen, Irene Pollach, Wiesbaden: Springer VS, Springer Fachmedien , 2013, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    .

  • 26.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Södertörn University, Sweden .
    Workplace location and ICTs substituting travel2009In: Organizational communication and sustainable development: ICTs for mobility / [ed] Anette Hallin, Tina Karrbom Gustavsson, IGI Global, 2009, p. 205-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on the assumption that keeping the number and length of business and commuting trips at reasonable levels could contribute to reaching targets of environmental sustainability. The authors highlight a couple of options for reducing or avoiding business trips and commuting through workplace location or improved use of communications. They present case studies concerning travel and communications, carried out by using diaries and interviews. They also present relevant literature on social practices and sustainability goals in relation to use of ICT. The aim is to shed light on variation in the use of travel and communications on an individual level in work life. The case studies illustrate that such variation is mainly due to the concrete practices involved in execution of professional duties and roles. Duties that involve a clearly defined end result or product being delivered regularly by the member of staff are correlated to clearly defined needs for communications. Less clearly defined end results of the work duties seem to make it harder for the individual to plan and perform communication and travel in a more energy saving way. The difference in professional duties can thus be expressed in terms of clarity and maturity. Another factor that affect who can replace travel with ICTs is relations of power, e.g., when a purchaser dictates the terms for a subcontractor concerning how and where to "deliver" his working time, service or product. The importance of clarity, maturity and power aspects means that professional practices need to be studied at a detailed level to find out who could substitute ICTs for travel and how this could be done.

  • 27. Högström, Ebba
    et al.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Performing Sustainability: Institutions, Inertia, and the Practices of Everyday Life2013In: Sustainable Stockholm: Exploring Urban Sustainability in Europe’s Greenest City / [ed] Metzger, Jonathan, and Amy Rader Olsson, New York and London: Routledge, 2013, p. 147-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Digitalisering och hållbar konsumtion: Underlagsrapport till fördjupad utvärdering av miljömålsarbetet2015Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    En modern entré till mer bilfria vardagsliv i Älvsjö och Haninge?: Lägenhetsköpares resvanor, dagliga aktiviteter och förväntningar före flytt till BRF On Track och BRF Blicken, med mobilitetstjänster och låga parkeringstal.2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (as published, with the title “A Modern Entrance to Car-free Everyday lives (Fredrik Johansson, Greger Henriksson)” at Polis Conference “Innovation in Transport for Sustainable Cities and Regions”, November 2018)

     

    Sweden, as well as many other countries, has used minimum parking requirements since the 50s, where the city requires the developer to provide a minimum number of parking spaces. Several researchers have criticized the appropriateness of this approach, highlighting that these requirements contribute to urban sprawl, increase construction costs and car use, and that they may reduce the number of apartments being built (Shoup, 1999). In the light of these criticisms many Swedish cities, such as Stockholm, have revised their parking policies, and now use lower and more flexible parking standards for apartments. These standards vary depending on the apartments’ location, public transport supply and supply of services in the area. Furthermore, the developer can substitute a certain amount of parking for other mobility services (such as membership in a car club).

    The results from a research project are presented, where two residential developments in the Stockholm region are planned according to these new more flexible principles. Interviews and surveys have been carried out with people who bought an apartment before they moved in, and a post-evaluation will be carried out when they have moved in (early autumn 2018). The presentation will mostly focus on the pre-evaluation, but some tentative results from the post-evaluation will also be presented.

     

    The principal focus was to understand:

    • how and why people travel as they do (e.g. how the travel habits are intertwined with other daily activities)
    • whether people are aware of the parking situation and the provision of mobility services as well as what they think of this.
    • how it affected their decision to move to the apartments and whether and how it influences their (planned) car ownership and travel habits (i.e. do they plan to sell their car, how does this procedure look
    • the car ownership and travel habits of people moving in to the pilot houses before and after they moved in

    Innovative part of project:

    Several cities around the world have started a shift away from minimum parking standards and towards a more flexible approach and with the aim to car traffic. However, these new guidelines, however promising, are not thoroughly evaluated, and planners at the municipalities are worried that not enough parking spaces are built. The innovative parts of this project are twofold:

     

    • Transdisciplinary research that, apart from the researchers, include the developers and the municipality. The research project started in 2011 and the transdisciplinary research group has worked together throughout the process from choosing the developments, planning and building the apartments and finally conducting evaluations before and after people move in (fall 2018). This on-going and participatory research methodology give us deep insights
    • Pre- and post evaluations, with qualitative focus. The second innovative part of the project is the qualitative evaluation methodology. The evaluations are not merely measuring quantitative factors, but focuses more particularly on understanding how habits are entwined in peoples’ daily activities, and perceived and given meaning to by people. Furthermore, the research gives insights into the process of changing habits and on how planners and developers can facilitate and aid in such a process.

    Results achieved:

     

    • Buyers’ car ownership and travel habits are quite similar to socio-demographically comparable populations
    • The distance to the commuter train and local centre is a precondition for reduced car ownership, and made some people starting to consider the need for a car
    • The mobility services and restricted number of parking spaces did not considerably affect the decision to move to the apartments.
    • People buying an apartment had limited experience with the mobility services (e.g. car club). They were positive to the mobility services, and several considered that they did not need a private car if only the mobility services functioned.
    • The developers had provided information about the mobility services throughout the entire process. Despite this, several people did not know about the mobility services, and some had misunderstood the services.
    • Retired people seemed to be a particularly interesting target group. Many retired people traveled more seldom, but still needed a car for some errands. This group was interested in the car club, both as a way to provide access to a car when needed, and to reduce mobility cost. However, they felt unsure about how the car club worked in practice and whether they would have access to a car when needed.

    Lessons learned:

    The results mentioned above will be complemented with a post-evaluation (autumn 2018), and some tentative results from the post-evaluation will also be presented.

    Some lessons learned so far are that these apartments do not seem to attract a specific target group, but seem to be applicable to a more general public. However, young people generally have a lower car ownership (and can be encouraged to not buy a car) and retired people may find it attractive to substitute a private car for mobility services (but feel unsecure about the services).

    Information is needed, but many also need to get tangible experiences (test) of the services. Moving in events may be a way for people to test the services. People are generally very positive to the approach and several informants mention that mobility services are “modern”. They also find it positive to not depend on a car, and to instead have a range of mobility options available.

  • 30.
    Kupersmidt, Judith
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Vem saknar en p-plats?: Bostadsrättsinnehavares syn på boendemiljö, egen bil, fordonspooler och mobilitetstjänster2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an environmentally sustainable city urban dwellers should have reasons and opportunities to shape their daily habits so that these become part of the sustainable development. This report covers the willingness and receptivity to adopt and/or maintain habits related to car ownership, parking, the use of vehicle pools and mobility services. The study is part of the project Innovative Parking in Climate Friendly Cities, which focuses on a specific concept of housing, mobility, parking, and the outdoor green and traffic environment. The concept is designed for application in newly built condominiums in Stockholm’s so-called inner suburbs (about 5-15 km from the city). Through interviews and focus groups we investigated the interest in moving to and living in such condominiums among representatives of the target group, i.e. people who are looking to buy a flat. Not unexpectedly, representatives who mainly relied on public transport, cycling and walking showed significant interest in moving to apartments which, in exchange for a relatively low number of parking spaces per new built apartment, offered different types of mobility solutions, such as vehicle pools and home deliveries. We consider approximately half of the households in the City of Stockholm belong to this group of non-motorists today. However, uncertain access to parking near the residence was found to be deterrent for motorists. For a more versatile category of motorists (who were also using other means of transport on a daily or weekly basis) interest in moving to accommodation in line with the above concept was higher than among habitual motorists. These mixers of modes seemed susceptible to pressure and/or support from the surrounding community. We also judge that their own experience of mobility services such as membership in a car pool, or even experience among relatives or friends, would increase their propensity to try out a vehicle pool themselves. In some cases we found that the mixers would also be prepared to do away with an own car. In summary, this study has led us to conclude that there is sufficient acceptance for the concept of Innovative Parking to be tried out in real conditions, through the building of blocks of flats with mobility services in exchange for sparse parking. The representatives of the target group showed demand for, or at least interest in, a green outdoor environment, restricted traffic around the home and a broader spectrum of mobility services.

  • 31.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Westermark, Mary
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hållbarhetsbedömning av en medierad tjänst - en pilotstudie2008Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Westermark, Mary
    Screening sustainability assessment of a mediated service: a pilot study2008Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Moberg, Åsa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Räsänen, Minna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Westermark, Mary
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Sustainability Assessment of a Mediated Service: a Pilot Study2008In: Electronics Goes Green 2008+: merging technology and sustainable development : Joint International Congress and Exhibition, 2008, p. 443-448Conference paper (Refereed)
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