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  • 1. Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Björkholm, Peter
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Johannisson, Pontus
    Johnsson, Christer
    Stigwall, Johan
    Södermalm, Svante
    MEMS-based inertial navigation instrumentation for high-dynamic applications2009In: COMS 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Asiatici, Mikhail
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems. Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Fischer, Andreas C.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems. Karlsruhe Inst Technol,Germany.
    Rodjegard, Henrik
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Capacitive inertial sensing at high temperatures of up to 400 degrees C2016In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 238, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-temperature-resistant inertial sensors are increasingly requested in a variety of fields such as aerospace, automotive and energy. Capacitive detection is especially suitable for sensing at high temperatures due to its low intrinsic temperature dependence. In this paper, we present high-temperature measurements utilizing a capacitive accelerometer, thereby proving the feasibility of capacitive detection at temperatures of up to 400 degrees C. We describe the observed characteristics as the temperature is increased and propose an explanation of the physical mechanisms causing the temperature dependence of the sensor, which mainly involve the temperature dependence of the Young's modulus and of the viscosity and the pressure of the gas inside the sensor cavity. Therefore a static electromechanical model and a dynamic model that takes into account squeeze film damping were developed.

  • 3.
    Askfors, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Hollmark, Malin
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Learning In Interdisciplinary Networks - For An Efficient Innovation System And An Improved Healthcare2013In: ICERI 2013: conference proceedings, International Association of Technology, Education and Development, IATED , 2013, p. 1000-1007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical Innovation Fellowships is a program that creates conditions for learning and for innovative thought to take place. It aims to educate innovators and to develop innovations that result in more efficient healthcare production. [1] Multiprofessional 4-person-teams of fellow candidates with competence in engineering, medicine, industrial design and management work together full time for eight months, with the aim to identify clinical needs that can be met by a medical technology innovation (process, product or service) or by an organizational improvement. Early in the program, the team spends two months full time at a clinical department observing the various healthcare activities. Among the clinical needs identified by the fellow candidates three needs will be chosen, validated and approved by the department's management as appropriate starting points for student thesis projects. We describe the phenomenon we have seen when introducing new disciplines as observers and problem solvers in a healthcare context as the improbable dialogue. The improbable dialogue is the unexpected dialogue between professionals and students, or professionals within separate disciplinary boundaries that generally never meet professionally. Such a dialogue may however be the channel in which the curiosity and openness of a novice can reflect on the daily work of a specialist, ultimately resulting in the development of ideas, knowledge exchange and learning. The Clinical Innovation Fellowships program enables this learning to take place and has shown to be a successful catalyst for the improbable dialogue; the unexpected, interdisciplinary, dialogue between healthcare specialists, high qualified fellow candidates with working experience and thesis students from different educational fields. This paper gives a qualitative problematization of the program with respect to the strategy and method of including thesis students to reinforce (almost) any innovation system through interdisciplinary, multiprofessional collaboration, where healthcare and academy learn from each other.

  • 4.
    Braun, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Sadoon, Samir
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Ridgeway, A S
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Small footprint knife gate microvalves for large flow control2005In: The 13th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems conference (IEEE TRANSDUCERS 2005), NEW YORK: IEEE conference proceedings, 2005, p. 329-332Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces the first area-optimized micromachined knife gate microvalve. In comparison to recent microvalves the pressure-flow performance is increased using out-of-plane actuators and an out-of-plane orifice. Three different actuator-gate designs and their fabrication are described. The valve features integrated therinal silicon/aluminum bimorph actuators where the aluminum layer forins the resistive heater as well as the bimorph material. The characterization of the actuators and of the pressure-flow perfon-nance is presented. The valve allows a flow change of Delta Q=3.4 1/min at 100 kPa on an active chip area of only 2.3 x 3.7 mm(2).

  • 5.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Assembly of microsystems for optical and fluidic applications2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses assembly issues encountered in optical and fluidic microsystem applications.

    In optics, the first subject concerns the active alignment of components in optical fibersystems. A solution for reducing the cost of optical component assembly while retaining submicron accuracy is to integrate the alignment mechanism onto the optical substrate. A polymer V-shaped actuator is presented that can carry the weight of the large components - on a micromechanical scale - and that can generate movement with six degrees of freedom.

    The second subject in optics is the CMOS-compatible fabrication of monocrystalline silicon micromirror arrays that are intended to serve as CMOS-controlled high-quality spatial light modulators in maskless microlithography systems. A wafer-level assembly method is presented that is based on adhesive wafer bonding whereby a monocrystalline layer is transferred onto a substrate wafer in a CMOS-compatible process without needing bond alignment.

    In fluidics, a hybrid assembly method is introduced that combines two separately micromachined structures to create hotwire anemometers that protrude from a surface with minimum interference with the air flow. The assembled sensor enables one to make accurate time-resolved measurements of the wall shear stress, a quantity that has previously been hard to measure with high time resolution. Also in the field of hotwire anemometers, a method using a hotwire anemometer array is presented for measuring the mass flow, temperature and composition of a gas in a duct.

    In biochemistry, a bio-analysis chip is presented. Single nucleotide polymorphism scoring is performed using dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH). Using monolayers of beads, multiplexing based on single-bead analysis is achieved at heating rates more than 20 times faster than conventional DASH provides.

    Space and material e±ciency in packaging are the focus of the other two projects in fluidics. The first introduces an assembly based on layering conductive adhesives for the fabrication of miniature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The fuel cells made with this low-cost approach perform among the best of their type to date. The second project concerns a new cross-flow microvalve concept. Intended as a step towards the mass production of large-flow I/P converters, the silicon footprint area is minimized by an out-of-plane moving gate and in-plane, half-open pneumatic channels.

  • 6.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Braun, Stefan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Ridgeway, Anthony S.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Sadoon, Samir
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Out-of-Plane Knife-Gate Microvalves for Controlling Large Gas Flows2006In: Journal of microelectromechanical systems, ISSN 1057-7157, E-ISSN 1941-0158, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1281-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers design issues for microvalves for large gas flow control. It introduces out-of-plane knife-gate microvalves as a novel design concept and a proportional microvalve concept for pressure control applications. The design of three different actuator-gate configurations and first prototypes are presented. The first valve prototypes feature thermal silicon-aluminum bimorph actuators and the pressure-flow performance per chip area of the demonstrator valve presented is greatly increased using out-of-plane actuation and an out-of-plane orifice. The characterization of the actuators and of the pressure-flow performance is presented. The prototype valve allows for a flow change of Delta Q = 3.4 standard liters per minute (SLPM) at a pressure change of Delta P = 95 kPa (P-in = 196.3 kPa, P-out = 101.3 kPa) on an active chip area of only 2.3 x 3.7 mm(2).

  • 7.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Enoksson, Peter
    Kildal, Per-Simon
    Fabrication method for high-frequency components2012Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Griss, Patrick
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Ebefors, Thorbjörn
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Sohlström, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Kälvesten, Edvard
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Thermal polymer V-shaped actuators for optical alignment applications2004In: Fifth Micro Structure Workshop, 2004, p. 117-120Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Griss, Patrick
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Sohlström, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Kälvesten, Edvard
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Robust, large-deflection, in-plane thermal polymer V-shaped actuators2004In: MEMS 2004: 17TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MICRO ELECTRO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS, TECHNICAL DIGEST, New York: IEEE , 2004, p. 510-513Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the design, fabrication and characteristics of the first in-plane V-shaped polymer actuator. Several different designs are evaluated and compared with each other. The intended application for this actuator is optical component alignment.

  • 10.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Griss, Patrick
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Sohlström, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Kälvesten, Edvard
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Robust, large-deflection, in-plane thermal polymer V-shaped actuatorsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Mucha, Dirk
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Chernoray, V
    Ebefors, Thorbjörn
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Enoksson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Löfdahl, Lennart
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Hybrid mounted micromachined aluminium hot-wire for near-wall turbulence measurements2002In: FIFTEENTH IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MICRO ELECTRO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS: TECHNICAL DIGEST, IEEE , 2002, p. 336-339Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first micromachined metal hot-wire anemometer sensor for use in near-wall turbulence measurements. To measure close to the surface without the circuitry interfering with the flow, a novel hybrid assembly of the sensor has been developed. We present the design, fabrication and characteristics of this sensor.

  • 12.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Mucha, Dirk
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Chernoray, Valery
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics Department, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ebefors, Thorbjörn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Enoksson, Peter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Löfdahl, Lennart
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics Department, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Hybrid-mounted micromachined aluminum hotwires for wall shear-stress measurements2005In: Journal of microelectromechanical systems, ISSN 1057-7157, E-ISSN 1941-0158, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 254-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a micromachined metal hotwire anemometer sensor for use in wall shear-stress measurements. We describe its design and fabrication. A novel hybrid assembly method has been developed to make it possible to measure close to the surface without contacting leads interfering with the flow. Experimental results illustrate the behavior and characteristics of this sensor.

  • 13.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Arrays of monocrystalline silicon micromirrors fabricated using CMOS compatible transfer bonding: IEEE The sixteenth annual international conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems2003In: MEMS-03: IEEE THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MICRO ELECTRO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS, New York: IEEE , 2003, p. 271-274Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present CMOS compatible fabrication of monocrystalline silicon micromirror arrays using membrane transfer bonding. To fabricate the micromirrors, a thin monocrystalline silicon device layer is transferred from a standard silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer to a target wafer (e.g. a CMOS wafer) using low temperature adhesive wafer bonding. In this way, very flat, uniform and low stress micromirror membranes made of monocrystalline silicon can be directly fabricated on top of CMOS circuits. The mirror fabrication does not contain any bond alignment between the wafers; thus, the mirror dimensions and alignment accuracies are only limited by the photolithographic steps. Micromirror arrays with 4x4 pixels and a pitch size of 16mum x 16mum have been fabricated.

  • 14.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Persson, Katrin
    Johander, Per
    3D packaging concept for inertial sensors2006In: Proceedings Eurosensors XX, Göteborg, Sweden, 2006, Vol. I, p. 192-193Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Haasl, Sjoerd
    et al.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Physical Sensors: Flow sensors2008In: Comprehensive Microsystems / [ed] Gianchandani, Yogesh; Tabata, Osamu; Zappe, Hans, Oxford: Elsevier Science , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16. Haj Hosseini, Neda
    et al.
    Rusu, Cristina
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Krozer, Anatol
    Enoksson, Peter
    Study of molecularly imprinted polymers as synthetic receptors for biochemical sensors2006In: Proceedings Eurosensors XX, Göteborg, Sweden, 2006, Vol. I, p. 428-9Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Hök, Bertil
    et al.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Kaisdotter Andersson, Annika
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Åkerlund, Per
    Breath Analyzer for Alcolocks and Screening Devices2010In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 10, p. 10-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcolocks and alcohol screening devices are becoming commonplace, and their use is expected to grow rapidly with cost reduction and improved usability. A new breath analyzer prototype is demonstrated, with the prospects of eliminating the mouthpiece, reducing expiration time and volume, improving long-term stability, and reducing life cycle cost. Simultaneous CO<sub>2</sub> measurements compensate for the sample dilution and unsaturated expiration. Infrared transmission spectroscopy is used for both the alcohol and CO<sub>2</sub> measurement, yet the entire system is contained within a small handheld unit. Experimental results are reported on the device sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and influence from varying measuring distance. The correlation between early and full-time sampling was established in 60 subjects. Basic concept verification was obtained, whereas resolution and selectivity still needs to be improved. Further improvements are expected by system optimization and integration.

  • 18.
    Jaouen, Frédéric
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Lundblad, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Lindbergh, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Adhesive copper films for an air-breathing polymer electrolyte fuel cell2005In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A design for an air-breathing and passive polymer electrolyte fuel cell is presented. Such a type of fuel cell is in general promising for portable electronics. In the present design, the anode current collector is made of a thin copper foil. The foil is provided with an adhesive and conductive coating, which firstly tightens the hydrogen compartment without mask or clamping pressure, and secondly secures a good electronic contact between the anode backing and the current collector. The cathode comprises a backing, a gold-plated stainless steel mesh and a current collector cut out from a printed circuit board. Three geometries for the cathode current collector were evaluated. Single cells with an active area of 2 cm(2) yielded a peak power of 250-300 MW cm(-2) with air and pure H-2 in a complete passive mode except for the controlled flow of H-2. The cells' response was investigated in steady state and transient modes.

  • 19. Johander, Per
    et al.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Persson, Katrin
    Harryson, Urban
    Layer Manufacturing as a Generic Tool for Microsystem Integration2007In: 4M 2007, Third International Conference on Multi-Material Micro Manufacture, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly every microsystem application requires specific packaging solutions. In this paper we suggest a newapproach to use layer manufacturing as a generic tool for microsystem integration. Three different methods to produce3D electrical interconnects are presented. Ink jet printing is used for the ceramic layer manufacturing process, as well asfor the printing of silver for circuit patterns. The technique is demonstrated for an Inertial Measurement Unit(IMU)platform. A four-sided pyramid was manufactured with layer manufacturing in ceramics and four gyroscopes weremounted on the sides of the pyramid. A demonstrator with three light diodes was also manufactured to demonstrate thepossibility to produce 3D electrical interconnects in the volume of the pyramid.

  • 20. Khan, Mohammed Faheem
    et al.
    Alavian Ghavanini, Farzan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    The IMEGO Institute, Sweden .
    Löfgren, Linus
    Persson, Katrin
    Rusu, Cristina
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; The IMEGO Institute, Sweden .
    Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari
    Enoksson, Peter
    Methods for characterization of wafer-level encapsulation applied on Si to LTCC Anodic bonding2010In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 064020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents initial results on generic characterization methods for wafer-level encapsulation. The methods, developed specifically to evaluate anodic bonding of low-temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) to Si, are generally applicable to wafer-level encapsulation. Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) structures positioned over the whole wafer provide local information about the bond quality. The structures include (i) resonating cantilevers as pressure sensors for bond hermeticity, (ii) resonating bridges as stress sensors for measuring the stress induced by the bonding and (iii) frames/mesas for pull tests. These MEMS structures have been designed, fabricated and characterized indicating that local information can easily be obtained. Buried electrodes to enable localized bonding have been implemented and their effectiveness is indicated from first results of the novel Si to LTCC anodic bonding.

  • 21. Kuch, B.
    et al.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Institute of Micro and Nanotechnology (IMEGO AB), Sweden .
    Wagner, M.
    Buttazzo, G.
    Sieber, A.
    Preliminary report: Embedded platform for inertial based underwater navigation2011In: Proc. Ninth Workshop Intelligent Solutions in Embedded Systems (WISES), 2011, p. 101-108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diver uses typically a compass, a depth gauge and a timer for underwater navigation. Especially when it comes to advanced diving in caves or wrecks, navigation and knowledge about the current position is extremely important, otherwise the diver might not find his way back to the surface and drown as soon as the breathing gas supply is finished. Other approaches are based on ultrasound transmitters that allow simple navigation tasks, however they are useless for applications like cave, wreck or long distance diving. The current paper describes a navigation platform for divers which is based on a handset with a depth sensor and a display, an inertial measurement unit incorporation gyroscopes, accelerometers and magentometers and an interface to attach different kinds of flow sensors for velocity measurement. A first prototype was developed. Additionally a buoy with an integrated GSM/GPS transmitter and a reference system for laboratory measurements can be attached. The prototype was validated in a pool and tests with the GPS reference system were carried out in the open sea.

  • 22.
    Löfdahl, Lennart
    et al.
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Chernoray, Valery
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics Department, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Sen, Mihir
    Dept. of Aeros. and Mech. Eng., University of Notre Dame.
    Characteristics of a hot-wire microsensor for time-dependent wall shear stress measurements2003In: Experiments in Fluids, ISSN 0723-4864, E-ISSN 1432-1114, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 240-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hot-wire microsensors for the purpose of measuring the instantaneous velocity gradient close to a wall were designed and their characteristics were evaluated. The sensors were made using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) technology, which permits the fabrication of various microgeometrical configurations with high precision and good repeatability. The design is based on estimates of the heat rates from the sensor wire to the air, through the supports, and to the wall. Several hot-wire configurations were fabricated with wires positioned in the range 50-250 mum from the wall. Requirements for the design and details of the fabrication methodology are outlined. The hot-wire microsensors were calibrated and tested in a flat-plate boundary layer with and without pressure gradients and were found to have good steady-state characteristics. In addition, the developed sensors were used for preliminary studies of transitional phenomena and turbulence, and the sensors were found to have a good time-dependent response as well.

  • 23. Löfgren, Linus
    et al.
    Löfving, B.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    Ottosson, Britta
    Rusu, Cristina
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    The Imego Institute, Sweden.
    Persson, Katrin
    Vermesan, Ovidiu
    Pesonen, Nadine
    Enoksson, Peter
    Low-power humidity sensor for RFID applications2008In: 4M2008 Conference, Cardiff, UK, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensors incorporated in RFID systems are important in several industrial, consumer and logisticsapplications. By extending RFID tags to sensing applications, the products become smarter. Application areas forthese smart tags include; health care (verification of the environmental conditions during transport or in storage of e.g.diapers, bandages, etc.), food monitoring (food quality during transport, storage and sales) and construction industry(e.g. building material).In this paper, a small, very low power and low cost humidity sensor tailor made for passive RFID applications ispresented. The sensor consists of a glass chip substrate with a sub-micron interdigitated gold electrode structurecovered with a humidity sensitive polyimide layer. The humidity absorbed by the sensing layer is measuredcapacitively. Finite element modeling and analytic calculations were used to determine the design of the interdigitatedelectrodes and the optimal thickness of the polyimide layer. A read-out electronics circuit was designed and used toevaluate the sensor. Sensors were fabricated and calibrations have been made to verify their function. The sensorresponse was close to linear from below 20 to above 90 %RH and its response time was proven to be at least as shortas that of the climate chamber, namely 0.1 %RH/s. The concept can easily be adapted to measure a range of otherparameters such as temperature or the presence of certain substances.

  • 24. Löfgren, Linus
    et al.
    Löfving, Björn
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    Ottosson, Britta
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH.
    Rusu, Cristina
    Persson, Katrin
    Vermesan, Ovidiu
    Pesonen, Nadine
    Enoksson, Peter
    Low-power humidity sensor2008In: Proceedings of Eurosensors, 2008, p. 231-234Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Najmzadeh, M.
    et al.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Imego AB, Sweden .
    Enoksson, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    Silicon Straight Tube Fluid Density Sensor2007In: Proceedings of IEEE Sensors, 2007, p. 1185-1188Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a micromachined silicon straight tube is tested as a fluid density sensor. In comparison with other density measurement techniques, the use of micromachined tubes require small sample volumes and allows continuous monitoring of the fluid density in microfluidic systems. Different vibration modes of the sensor were detected and calibrated using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). Linearity, simplicity, the straightforward fabrication and evaluation, the low flow restriction and reduced risk of trapping gas in the sensor due the absence of corners are the design’s main advantages. The ability of the sensor to measure density of multiphase fluids and provide accurate results independent of other fluid parameters, allows it to be used in varying fields such as the biomedical, pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries.

  • 26. Najmzadeh, Mohammad
    et al.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Imego AB, Sweden .
    Enoksson, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden .
    A silicon straight tube fluid density sensor2007In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 17, no 8, article id 032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a new and simple silicon straight tube is tested as a fluid density sensor. The tube structure has a hexagonal cross section. The fabrication process consists of anisotropic silicon etching and silicon fusion bonding. A tube structure with a length of 2.65 cm was tested. The sample volume is 9.3 mu L. The first three modes of vibrations were investigated with a laser Doppler vibrometer for air and five liquid mixtures. The fluid density sensitivity of each mode was measured and the average was -256 +/- 6 ppm ( kg m(-3))(-1) around the density of water. The density of an unknown fluid can be continuously monitored using this sensor by measuring the resonance frequency of one of the vibration modes and extracting the density from the calibration curves.

  • 27. Najmzadeh, Mohammad
    et al.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Imego AB, SWEDEN.
    Enoksson, Peter
    Chalmers University of Technology, SWEDEN.
    A Straight Silicon Tube As A Microfluidic Density Sensor2007In: Proceedings of the 11th international conference on miniaturized systems for chemistry and life sciences (MicroTAS), 2007, Vol. 1, p. 536-538Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Niklaus, Frank
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Arrays of monocrystalline silicon micromirrors fabricated using CMOS compatible transfer bonding2003In: Journal of microelectromechanical systems, ISSN 1057-7157, E-ISSN 1941-0158, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 465-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present CMOS compatible fabrication of monocrystalline silicon micromirror arrays using membrane transfer bonding. To fabricate the micromirrors, a thin monocrystalline silicon device layer is transferred from a standard silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer to a target wafer (e.g., a CMOS wafer) using low-temperature adhesive wafer bonding. In this way, very flat, uniform and low-stress micromirror membranes made of monocrystalline silicon can be directly fabricated on top of CMOS circuits. The mirror fabrication does not contain any bond alignment between the wafers, thus, the mirror dimensions and alignment accuracies are only limited by the photolithographic steps. Micromirror arrays with 4 x 4 pixels and a pitch size of 16 mum x 16 mum have been fabricated. The monocrystalline silicon micromirrors are 0.34 mum thick and have feature sizes as small as 0.6 mum. The distance between the addressing electrodes and the mirror membranes is 0.8 mum. Torsional micromirror arrays are used as spatial light modulators, and have potential applications in projection display systems, pattern generators for maskless lithography systems, optical spectroscopy, and optical communication systems. In principle, the membrane transfer bonding technique can be applied for integration of CMOS circuits with any type of transducer that consists of membranes and that benefits from the use of high temperature annealed or monocrystalline materials. These types of devices include thermal infrared detectors, RF-MEMS,IS devices, tuneable vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and other optical transducers.

  • 29.
    Pineiro, Erik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Lindahl, M.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science (closed 20130101).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Multiprofessional innovation teams as amoeba: lessons for the teachers2011In: ICERI2011 Proceedings / [ed] Torres, IC; Chova, LG; Martinez, AL, 2011, p. 7259-7259Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Brazalez, A. A.
    Raza, H.
    Pucci, E.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Kildal, P. -S
    Enoksson, P.
    100 GHz SOI gap waveguides2013In: 2013 Transducers and Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS and EUROSENSORS 2013, 2013, p. 510-513Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two gap waveguide technologies, groove and ridge, are presented here for F-band applications. Three different groove gap waveguide devices and four different ridge gap waveguide devices have been fabricated. All of them were micromachined to achieve the feature size required for the frequency band and fabricated in a single process using SOI wafers. The two types provide a more robust coupling to standard waveguides and high frequency probes. Measurements for most of the devices are shown in this paper, showing robust measurements and good agreement with simulations. More measurements need to be done but the initial ones show the promise both in the manufacturing technique and the coupling.

  • 31. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Hansson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kohler, E.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Haraldsson, Klas Tommy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Enoksson, P.
    Rapid manufacturing of OSTE polymer RF-MEMS components2017In: Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), IEEE, 2017, p. 901-904Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the first RF-MEMS component in OSTE polymer. Three OSTE-based ridge gap resonators were fabricated by direct, high aspect ratio, photostructuring. The OSTE polymer's good adhesion to gold makes it suitable for RF-MEMS applications. The OSTE ridge gap resonators differ in how they were coated with gold. The OSTE-based devices are compared to each other as well as to Si-based, SU8-based, and CNT-based devices of equal design. The OSTE-based process was performed outside the cleanroom, and with a fast fabrication process (∼1 h). The OSTE-based device performance is on par with that of the other alternatives in terms of frequency, attenuation, and Q-factor.

  • 32. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Pucci, E.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Enoksson, P.
    Micromachined contactless pin-flange adapter for robust high-frequency measurements2014In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 084004-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first micromachined double-sided contactless WR03 pin-flange adapter for 220-325 GHz based on gap waveguide technology. The pin-flange adapter is used to avoid leakage at the interface of two waveguides even when a gap between them is present and can be fitted onto any standard WR03 waveguide flange. Tolerance measurements were performed with gaps ranging from 30-100 mu m. The performance of the micromachined pin flange has been compared to a milled pin flange, a choke flange and to standard waveguide connections. The micromachined pin flange is shown to have better performance than the standard connection and similar performance to the milled pin flange and choke flange. The benefits of micromachining over milling are the possibility to mass produce pin flanges and the better accuracy in the 2D design. Measurements were performed with and without screws fixing the flanges. The flanges have also been applied to measure two devices, a straight rectangular waveguide of 1.01 inch and a ridge gap resonator. In all cases, the micromachined pin flange performed flawlessly while the standard flange experienced significant losses at already small gaps.

  • 33. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Raza, H.
    Zaman, A. U.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Enoksson, P.
    Kildal, P. -S
    Micromachined gap waveguides for 100 GHz applications2013In: 2013 7th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation, EuCAP 2013, EurAAP , 2013, p. 1935-1938Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper demonstrates groove gap waveguides at around 100 GHz, fabricated on Gold-plated micromachined silicon. Three different groove gap waveguides have been manufactured and measured: a resonator for determining Q-factor and thereby attenuation, a straight waveguide, and a waveguide with two 90 degree bends.

  • 34. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Zaman, A. U.
    Pucci, E.
    Raza, H.
    Vassilev, V.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Lundgren, P.
    Kildal, P. -S
    Enoksson, P.
    Design of micromachined ridge gap waveguides for millimeter-wave applications2011In: Procedia Eng., 2011, p. 519-522Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ridge gap waveguide is a new transmission line for millimeter-wave applications. Traditionally, rectangular waveguides are used for those applications due to their low loss. However their fabrication requires precision machining, very good electrical contact and alignment between two joining mechanical parts. Ridge gap waveguides can obtain similar performance without requiring conductive sidewalls and this provides more freedom during the fabrication and assembly process as the structure is no longer sensitive to small gaps between the side walls and the upper lid. The ridge gap waveguide has already been validated for 10-20 GHz using conventional fabrication methods. The ridge gap waveguide prototypes presented in this paper are designed to work in the frequency region between 210 and 340 GHz, and fabricated using MEMS technology. MEMS technology provides fabrication precision of the structures and thus opens the path for high-frequency components.

  • 35. Rahiminejad, S.
    et al.
    Zaman, A. U.
    Pucci, E.
    Raza, H.
    Vassilev, V.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Lundgren, P.
    Kildal, P. -S
    Enoksson, P.
    Micromachined ridge gap waveguide and resonator for millimeter-wave applications2012In: Sensors and Actuators A-Physical, ISSN 0924-4247, E-ISSN 1873-3069, Vol. 186, p. 264-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ridge gap waveguide is a fundamentally new high-frequency waveguide. It does not need any electrical contact between the split blocks which gives it an advantage compared to the rectangular waveguide which is the standard today. These waveguides are conventionally fabricated by milling, although above 100 GHz milling is not adequate anymore. MEMS technology on the other hand, can offer high-precision fabrication and thus opens the path for new types of high-frequency components. In this paper both a ridge gap waveguide and a ridge gap resonator have been fabricated for the frequencies 220-325 GHz using M EMS technology. Support packages have been designed to enable device measurements. Simulations show that the reflection coefficient for the ridge gap waveguide is below -15 dB between 240 and 340 GHz. Two resonance peaks were measured at the frequencies 234 GHz and 284 GHz for the ridge gap resonator with unloaded Q-values of 336 and 527 respectively. Both the waveguide and resonator have the potential to obtain similar performances as the rectangular waveguide without strict requirement on electrical contact, allowing simplified fabrication and assembly technique.

  • 36. Rahiminejad, Sofia
    et al.
    Pucci, Elena
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Enoksson, Peter
    SU8 ridge-gap waveguide resonator2014In: International journal of microwave and wireless technologies, ISSN 1759-0795, E-ISSN 1759-0787, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 459-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present the first ridge-gap waveguide resonator made with a polymer base. It is designed for the frequency range 220-325 GHz, and is fabricated solely using a Au coated two-layer SU8-based process. The design is based on previous work done with Si. The new process has advantages such as fewer and cheaper process steps. The SU8 ridge-gap waveguide resonator is made in order to obtain attenuation characteristics via the measured Q-factor of the resonator. The ridge-gap waveguide resonator has the same dimensions as the previous one fabricated in Si, and the same thickness of the Au coating. The SU8-based resonator shows an attenuation loss of 0.41 dB/mm at 282.2 GHz compared to the Si-based resonator with an attenuation loss of 0.043 dB/mm at 283.5 GHz. This makes the SU8 process a more cost-effective alternative to the Si process

  • 37. Rahiminejad, Sofia
    et al.
    Pucci, Elena
    Vassilev, Vessen
    Kildal, Per-Simon
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Enoksson, Peter
    Polymer Gap Adapter for Contactless, Robust, and Fast Measurements at 220-325 GHz2016In: Journal of microelectromechanical systems, ISSN 1057-7157, E-ISSN 1941-0158, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 160-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiation leakages are a considerable problem when measuring waveguide structures at high frequencies. In order to maintain good electrical contact, flanges need to be tightly and evenly screwed to the device under test. This can be a time-consuming operation, especially with repeated measurements. We present a metamaterial-based adapter, which prohibits leakage even in the presence of gaps at the interconnects. This so-called gap adapter has been fabricated from a metallized polymer (SU8). The reflection coefficient is below -20 dB throughout the band for a 50-mu m gap on both sides of the gap adapter. In comparison, a conventional waveguide with a 50-mu m gap on both sides has a reflection coefficient of -10 dB. The gap adapter can be used to perform fast measurements, since the normal flange screws are redundant. We compare the SU8 gap adapter with a Si version and to a smooth metal waveguide reference disc. The SU8 gap adapter performed better than the Si version and much better than the waveguide disc in all test cases. SU8 gap adapters were used to measure on a waveguide component. The SU8 gap adapters with 50-mu m gaps performed comparable with the waveguide component with the flange screws carefully tightened. The polymer also makes the gap adapter mechanically robust and easy to mass fabricate. [2015-0113]

  • 38. Rahiminejad, Sofia
    et al.
    Zaman, Ashraf U.
    Raza, Hasan
    Vassilev, Vessen
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Per
    Kildal, Per-Simon
    Enoksson, Peter
    Micromachined ridge gap waveguide for sub millimeter and millimeter wave applications2011In: MME 2011: 22nd Micromechanics and Micro Systems Europe Workshop, June 19-22, 2011, Toensberg, Norway, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Russom, Aman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Brookes, Anthony J.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Rapid melting curve analysis on monolayered beads for high-throughput genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms2006In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 78, no 7, p. 2220-2225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a rapid solid-phase melting curve analysis method for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The melting curve analysis is based on dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH). The DNA duplexes are conjugated on beads that are immobilized on the surface of a microheater chip with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. SNP on PCR products were scored, illustrating the sensitivity and robustness of the system. The method is based on random bead immobilization by microcontact printing. Single-bead detection and multiplexing were performed with a heating rate more than 20 times faster than conventional DASH. Analyses that took more than 15 min could be performed in less that 1 min, enabling ultrarapid SNP analysis. In addition, an array version of the chip was implemented enabling the preparation of an array of bead arrays for high-throughput and rapid SNP genotyping.

  • 40.
    Russom, Aman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Brookes, Anthony J.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Ultra-rapid melting curve analysis on beads for high-throughput genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism2005In: Micro Total Analysis Systems - Proceedings of MicroTAS 2005 Conference: 9th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Transducers Research Foundations, 2005, p. 1006-1008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes a rapid solid-phase melting curve analysis method based on dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH) for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Beads with DNA duplexes are immobilized on the surface of a microheater chip. SNP on PCR products were scored, illustrating the sensitivity and robustness of the system. Single-bead detection and multiplexing were performed with a heating rate more than 20 times faster than conventional DASH. Hence, analyses that took more than 15 minutes could be performed in less than 1 minute, enabling ultra-rapid SNP analysis.

  • 41.
    Russom, Aman
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Ohlander, Anna
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Genotyping by dynamic heating of monolayered beads on a microheated surface2004In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 25, no 21-22, p. 3712-3719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A miniaturized bead-based dynamic allele-specific hybridization (DASH) approach for sing le-nucleotide polymorphism analysis is presented. Chips with integrated heater and temperature sensors for open-surface DNA analysis were microfabricated. Microcontact printing using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp was employed to create monolayers of immobilized beads on the surface of the chip. This chip allows fast, well-controllable temperature ramping. The temperature distribution was homogeneous over the entire heater area. All three possible variants of an SNP site of a synthesized oligonucleotide were accurately scored using the bead-based DASH approach. Our assay has a nonoptimized temperature ramping rate of 4degreesC-6degreesC/min compared to earlier reported values of 2degreesC-3degreesC/min, thereby reducing the total analysis time by a factor of 2. Reliable DASH measurement data from areas as small as 12 x 13 mum was achieved. Our bead-based DASH approach has enabled a dramatic volume reduction and is a step towards developing a cost-effective high-throughput DASH method on arrays of single beads.

  • 42.
    Russom, Aman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Ohlander, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Mayr, T.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Brookes, A. J.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Genotyping by dynamic heating of monolayered beads on a microheater surface2005In: Micro Total Analysis Systems 2004 / [ed] Laurell T; Nilsson J; Jensen K; Harrison DJ, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2005, no 297, p. 303-305Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents SNP scoring by DASH technology by employing dynamic heating of beads immobilized on a chip with integrated heater and sensor. The microfabricated chip designed for open-surface DNA analysis allows fast, well controllable temperature ramping and homogeneous temperature distribution over the entire heater area. Beads containing DNA duplexes are immobilized on the surface of the chip by microcontact printing using a PDMS stamp. All three possible variants of a SNP site of an oligonucleotide were accurately scored using the bead-based DASH approach. Using the chip, the total analysis time could easily be reduced by a factor 2 compared with the current DASH assay.

  • 43.
    Schröder, Stephan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Nafari, A
    Persson, K
    Westby, E
    Fischer, Andreas C.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Technology in Medicine and Health, CTMH.
    Stress-minimized packaging of inertial sensors using wire bonding2013In: 2013 Transducers & Eurosensors XXVII: The 17th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems (TRANSDUCERS & EUROSENSORS XXVII), IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 1962-1965Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a packaging approach for inertial sensors using wire bonding technology. The die is mounted exclusively by bond wires on the front- and backside to the package. Conventional single-side die attach to substrates, such as gluing, is abandoned. The approach is characterized by its novel and symmetric die attach concept as well as its simplicity of applying a standard wire bonding process. The wire bond attachment facilitates significant reduction of thermally induced mechanical stresses. The attachment concept is characterized in terms of attachment stiffness and potential die resonances using Laser Doppler Vibrometry(LDV). White-light interferometry is used to investigate stress related warping that is induced by the die attachment process.

  • 44.
    Stemme, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Griss, Patrick
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Kälvesten, Edvard
    Sohlström, Hans
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Ebefors, Thorbjörn
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Three dimensional alignment method and system2002Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A system for achieving fixation of one or more moveable micro machined platforms for passively aligned optical components, comprising - a support structure containing structures for passive alignment of optical components- platforms containing structures for passive alignment of optical components- actuators for actively aligning the already passively aligned components on the platforms and the support structure to each other, where the actuators are strong enough while actuating to keep the platforms steady during fixation and weak enough while not actuating so as not to impede the fixation- a fixation mechanism to fixate the moveable platforms to the support structure.

  • 45.
    Stemme, Göran
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Lennart, Löfdahl
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Chernoray, Valery G.
    Thermo and Fluid Dynamics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Gibson, Alister N.
    The Queen’s University of Belfast, School of Aeronautical Engineering, BT7 1NN Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Time-resolved wall shear stress measurements using MEMS2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) wall mounted hot wire sensors have been developed at the Thermoand Fluid Dynamics department (TFD) at Chalmers University of Technology. The sensors were used to investigate the fluctuationsof the velocity within the viscous sublayer of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer flow. The measurements performed atReynolds numbers, Rµ ranging between 1000 and 15000 are discussed and compared to other relevant data collected from literature.

  • 46.
    Wijngaart, Wouter van der
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Jaouen, Frederic
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology (Changed name 20121201).
    Lundblad, Anders
    Electrochemical device2005Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    A polymer electrolyte electrochemical device comprising an anode current collector (1), a membrane electrode assembly (2) with anode and cathode gas backings (3, 4), and a cathode current collector (5), wherein the membrane electrode assembly is sealed and attached at least to the anode current collector by adhesive means, thereby creating an anode gas chamber, and optionally attached to the cathode current collector by adhesive means, said adhesive means being electrically conducting or electrically non-conducting. The invention also relates to polymer electrolyte electrochemical device components adapted for use in a single cell electrochemical device and a series arrangement electrochemical device.

  • 47.
    Windå, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Haasl, Sjoerd
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Melvås, Patrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Implementation of a hotwire array sensor for fluid property analysis via flow velocity distribution measurementsArticle in journal (Other academic)
1 - 47 of 47
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