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  • 1.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    et al.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom / Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Head, Jenny
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, United Kingdom.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Population-based Cohorts Unit, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Villejuif, France / Research Unit 1168 Aging and Chronic Diseases—Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Villejuif, France / Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
    Airagnes, Guillaume
    Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France / Department of Psychiatry and Addictology, AP-HP, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Ouest, Paris, France.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education.
    Jokela, Markus
    Medicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Zins, Marie
    Population-based Cohorts Unit, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Villejuif, France / Research Unit 1168 Aging and Chronic Diseases—Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), Villejuif, France / Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland / Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sickness absence diagnoses among abstainers, low-risk drinkers and at-risk drinkers: consideration of the U-shaped association between alcohol use and sickness absence in four cohort studies2018In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 113, no 9, p. 1633-1642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To estimate differences in the strength and shape of associations between alcohol use and diagnosis-specific sickness absence. Design A multi-cohort study. Participants (n = 47 520) responded to a survey on alcohol use at two time-points, and were linked to records of sickness absence. Diagnosis-specific sickness absence was followed for 4-7 years from the latter survey. Setting and participants From Finland, we had population cohort survey data from 1998 and 2003 and employee cohort survey data from 2000-02 and 2004. From France and the United Kingdom, we had employee cohort survey data from 1993 and 1997, and 1985-88 and 1991-94, respectively. Measurements We used standard questionnaires to assess alcohol intake categorized into 0, 1-11 and > 11 units per week in women and 0, 1-34 and > 34 units per week in men. We identified groups with stable and changing alcohol use over time. We linked participants to records from sickness absence registers. Diagnoses of sickness absence were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases. Estimates were adjusted for sex, age, socio-economic status, smoking and body mass index. Findings Women who reported drinking 1-11 units and men who reported drinking 1-34 units of alcohol per week in both surveys were the reference group. Compared with them, women and men who reported no alcohol use in either survey had a higher risk of sickness absence due to mental disorders [rate ratio = 1.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-1.88], musculoskeletal disorders (1.22, 95% CI = 1.06-1.41), diseases of the digestive system (1.35, 95% CI = 1.02-1.77) and diseases of the respiratory system (1.49, 95% CI = 1.29-1.72). Women who reported alcohol consumption of > 11 weekly units and men who reported alcohol consumption of > 34 units per week in both surveys were at increased risk of absence due to injury or poisoning (1.44, 95% CI = 1.13-1.83). Conclusions In Finland, France and the United Kingdom, people who report not drinking any alcohol on two occasions several years apart appear to have a higher prevalence of sickness absence from work with chronic somatic and mental illness diagnoses than those drinking below a risk threshold of 11 units per week for women and 34 units per week for men. Persistent at-risk drinking in Finland, France and the United Kingdom appears to be related to increased absence due to injury or poisoning.

  • 2.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jokela, Markus
    Institute of Behavioral Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Inserm U1018, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden / Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Koege Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Burr, Hermann
    Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), Berlin, Germany.
    Casini, Annalisa
    School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Clays, Els
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    De Bacquer, Dirk
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Dragano, Nico
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Erbel, Raimund
    Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Geuskens, Goedele A.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Hamer, Mark
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Hooftman, Wendela E.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Houtman, Irene L.
    TNO, Hoofddorp, Netherlands.
    Jöckel, Karl-Heinz
    Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Kittel, France
    School of Public Health, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lunau, Thorsten
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Unit of Social Medicine, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    The Danish National Centre for Social Research, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark / Department of Public Health and Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland / Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Institute for Medical Sociology, Medical Faculty, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    University of Skövde, School of Health and Education. University of Skövde, Health and Education. Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland / Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland / Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    O'Reilly, Dermot
    Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Kumari, Meena
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom.
    Batty, G. David
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology and Alzheimer Scotland Dementia Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom / School of Community and Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Tampere and Turku, Finland.
    Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals2015In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 386, no 10005, p. 1739-1746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. Findings We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603 838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528 908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5.1 million person-years (mean 8.5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3.8 million person-years (mean 7.2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (>= 55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.26; p=0.02) and incident stroke (1.33, 1.11-1.61; p=0.002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1.30-1.42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1.10 (95% CI 0.94-1.28; p=0.24) for 41-48 working hours, 1.27 (1.03-1.56; p=0.03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1.33 (1.11-1.61; p=0.002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (p(trend)<0.0001). Interpretation Employees who work long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. 

  • 3.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Soc Human Dev & Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Björner, Jakob B.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brunner, Eric J.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Burr, Hermann
    Fed Inst Occupat Safety & Hlth, Berlin, Germany.
    Dragano, Nico
    Univ Dusseldorf, Fac Med, Inst Med Sociol, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamer, Mark
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Heikkila, Katriina
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Publ Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Bispebjerg Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umea Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pejtersen, Jan H.
    Danish Natl Ctr Social Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Salo, Paula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Univ Dusseldorf, Fac Med, Inst Med Sociol, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Suominen, Sakari
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.
    Theorell, Tres
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala Univ, Occupat & Environm Med, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stress Res Inst, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Behav Sci, Helsinki, Finland.
    Long working hours, socioeconomic status, and the risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of published and unpublished data from 222 120 individuals2015In: LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, ISSN 2213-8587, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Working long hours might have adverse health effects, but whether this is true for all socioeconomic status groups is unclear. In this meta-analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, we investigated the role of long working hours as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Methods We identified four published studies through a systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase up to April 30, 2014. Study inclusion criteria were English-language publication; prospective design (cohort study); investigation of the effect of working hours or overtime work; incident diabetes as an outcome; and relative risks, odds ratios, or hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, or sufficient information to calculate these estimates. Additionally, we used unpublished individual-level data from 19 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working-Populations Consortium and international open-access data archives. Effect estimates from published and unpublished data from 222 120 men and women from the USA, Europe, Japan, and Australia were pooled with random-effects meta-analysis. Findings During 1.7 million person-years at risk, 4963 individuals developed diabetes (incidence 29 per 10 000 person-years). The minimally adjusted summary risk ratio for long (>= 55 h per week) compared with standard working hours (35-40 h) was 1.07 (95% CI 0.89-1.27, difference in incidence three cases per 10 000 person-years) with significant heterogeneity in study-specific estimates (I-2 = 53%, p = 0.0016). In an analysis stratified by socioeconomic status, the association between long working hours and diabetes was evident in the low socioeconomic status group (risk ratio 1.29, 95% CI 1.06-1.57, difference in incidence 13 per 10 000 person-years, I-2 = 0%, p = 0.4662), but was null in the high socioeconomic status group (1. 00, 95% CI 0.80-1.25, incidence diff erence zero per 10 000 person-years, I-2 = 15%, p = 0.2464). The association in the low socioeconomic status group was robust to adjustment for age, sex, obesity, and physical activity, and remained after exclusion of shift workers. Interpretation In this meta-analysis, the link between longer working hours and type 2 diabetes was apparent only in individuals in the low socioeconomic status groups. Copyright (C) Kivimaki et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY.

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