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  • 1.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Implementation and use of OEE as a production performance measure2011In: Proceedings of the 4th Swedish Production Symposium, May 3-5th, Lund, 2011, Lund University, Sweden., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Managing Production Performance with Overall Equipment Efficiency (OEE) - Implementation Issues and Common Pitfalls2011In: Proceedings of the 44th Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP), Wisconsin, US, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the current global competitive environment it is of immense importance for manufacturing companies tokeep track of, and improve the production performance of their production systems. One of the most widelyused performance measures is OEE, a powerful tool for production development if used correctly. Based ona theoretical analysis and a case study within a manufacturing company in the automotive industrychallenges associated with the implementation of OEE are identified and analyzed. Furthermore, the paperpresents conclusions of how to utilize the OEE measure for efficient management of improvement inproduction performance.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Carin
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Windmark, Christina
    Lund University.
    Production Location Handbook: Forming Your Strategic Manufacturing Footprint2013Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Carin H.
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the complexity of using performance measures: Enhancing sustained production improvement capability by combining OEE and productivity2015In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 35, p. 144-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global speed of change within the manufacturing industry forces companies to constantly improve production performance. In that effort, performance measures are critical for driving and managing production improvements. Two of the most commonly used measures in operations are productivity and overall equipment efficiency (OEE). However, the potential of using these measures as improvement drivers is not fully utilized in industry today due, for example, to ambiguities in definitions and their interpretation. A study of available theory indicates a gap between these implications from a theoretical perspective vs. the industrial perspective. Bridging this theory-practice gap implies great potential for competitiveness and growth in manufacturing, since the latent production capacity that could be utilized is tremendous. Even if a high degree of complexity in definition and calculation when applied in operational conditions might be perceived, this paper will show that a systematically used combined set of OEE and productivity measures can successfully drive production improvements. Also, two new productivity measures for driving improvements at the shop floor level are proposed. The empirical findings are based on a two-year case study within a manufacturing company in the automotive industry using an interactive research approach. 

  • 6.
    Andersson Schaeffer, Jennie
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Spatial design and communication for Improved Production Performance2009In: Proceedings of The International 3rd Swedish Production Symposium: Göteborg, Sweden, 2-3 december 2009 / [ed] Rosén, B.G., Swedish Production Academy, 2009, p. 317-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper present research results on how a spatial design can communicate and support

    production performance in relation to lean production. The main concern of this paper is to

    discuss the role of interior design and its affect on humans in a production system and to

    contribute to a more profound understanding of lean production from a communicative aspect.

    This paper is focusing on three case studies: a project studio, a prototype workshop, and a

    development workshop in manufacturing companies. The study in the development workshop

    is conducted during a period of two years, with an ambitious survey as follow up. The

    two others are context cases to exemplify and investigate the role of interior design in an

    industrial environment, with project studios as the main subject.

    The research method chosen is case study methodology including a literature review related

    to examples from the industrial case studies.

    In industry, spatial design in interaction with visual artefacts can be used to reduce the 8th

    waste by supporting effective communication, cross-functional work, decision-making processes,

    reinforcing the project identity, facilitating project management, save time, shorten

    led time for development projects and inspire employees to a positive view of the company

    and the project.

     

  • 7.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    A corporate perspective on global management and development of lean production systems: A case study2014In: Handbook of Research on Design and Management of Lean Production Systems, IGI Global, 2014, p. 270-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge for every multinational manufacturing company with the ambition to implement the lean production concept is how to implement it worldwide within its global manufacturing footprint. There are many decisions that need to be taken from a company group perspective when planning and implementing a lean program. These concern the level of standardization on principles and tools, how to structure and organize additional resources, how to share experiences within the organization, and how to sustain the effort. These factors are elaborated in this chapter from a factory perspective based on the presentation of the lean journey of Gyproc AB, a process industry company within the Gypsum part of the large Saint Gobain group. The company has worked for about ten years with implementing world-class manufacturing and has extensive experience of the issues of starting-up and sustaining the lean-based concept. 

  • 8.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Environmental Management in Manufacturing Industries2015In: Handbook of Clean Energy Systems / [ed] Jinyue Yan, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental concern requires manufacturing industries to direct resources and effort toward strategies and activities that help reducing their overall environmental impact. Using environmental management systems (EMSs) such as ISO 14001 or similar is common. However, as the EMSs do not put absolute requirements on the organization's environmental performance, it is still up to each manufacturing company to set the ambition level. As part of the EMSs, the identification of the environmental aspects to be dealt with during the operations phase could be supported by an industrial applicable method called Green Performance Map (GPM), engaging the employees on all levels to work with those environmental improvements they could impact. While most manufacturing companies are implementing the concept of lean production, it is advantageous to integrate the environmental improvement work into the existing lean infrastructure with, for example, daily management systems and scheduled activities for continuous improvement. Another approach discussed in the article is the need for emphasizing the design of the production system as an upstream activity that has fundamental impact on the environmental performance downstream, that is, in the operations phase. When designing new production equipment or renovating existing equipment, the opportunities to incorporate more energy- and resource-efficient solutions are much greater and cheaper compared to investing in such solutions afterward during serial production. Arguably, a combined design and operations approach is necessary in order to achieve a complete green mindset that will guide the environmental actions on both the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Managing the environmental tasks is part of the overall strive toward lean and clean energy systems in manufacturing industry.

  • 9.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 10.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 11.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Decision support for production localization: Process, activities and localization factors2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional production location decisions are mainly based upon economic factors while factors that facilitate decision makers in selecting the most suitable production location in terms of operations performance are rarely considered. Therefore, this paper presents a developed decision support for production localization that emphasises operational factors to be considered in the decision making. The research methodology combines a literature study with a multiple case study method. The findings are synthesised into a five phase decision process for making production localization decisions in practice. For each of these phases, key activities with related tools and expected output are developed.

  • 12.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Höckerdal, Karin
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Green Performance Map: Handbok2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Höckerdal, Karin
    Kurdve, Martin
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Green Performance Map: Handbok2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Kurdve, Martin
    Chalmers.
    Hanna, Rodan
    Södertälje Science Park.
    Cost driven Green Kaizen in pharmaceutical production: Creating positive engagement for environmental improvements2019In: Procedia CIRP 81, Vol. 81, p. 1219-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Production development: design and operation of production systems2009Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Säfsten, Kristina
    Produktionsutveckling: utveckling och drift av produktionssystem2005Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Xie, Jianyuan
    Factors related to local supply base development affecting production localisation in China2012In: Capturing Value in International Manufacturing and Supply Networks: Symposium proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years, foreign manufacturers have extended their manufacturing footprint to include China. According to the World Bank China has overtaken Japan as the world’s second-largest economy since 2010. China’s growth is largely funded by a continuous manufacturing boom where both domestic industries and infrastructure have developed extensively, facilitating foreign-owned manufacturing companies to locate production in China. An important issue of common interest to all manufacturing companies in the course of localizing production to China is how to develop an efficient supply base. On a basis of interviews with 12 manufacturing entities (comprising eight foreign manufacturers and four local supplier companies) in China from April to July, 2012, this paper investigates factors of importance to supply base localisation in China. The analysis of the empirical and theoretical findings constitutes the bases for increased understanding supporting foreign manufactures in their development of a supply base and sourcing strategy for production in China.

  • 18.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Kaizen and Kaikaku–: Recent challenges and support models2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Bellgran, Monica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Yamamoto, Yuji
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Jackson, Mats
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Kaizen and Kaikaku–: Recent challenges and support models2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Berglund, Rachael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. IPR (Innovation and Product Realisation).
    Critical Psychosocial Risk Treatment for Engineers and Technicians2019In: ICRAM 2019 ICRAM, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Berglund, Rachael
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Backström, Tomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    How companies work with the psychosocial work environment2018In: Experiments and measures to promote well-being and occupational health, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to leading researchers such as by Leka & Cox, Psychosocial risk management is recommended as the way to proactively and systematically ensure that work factors in the organizational and social work environment lead to wellbeing and engagement instead of strain, stress and ultimately exhaustion. Companies in Sweden scored the highest among companies in Europe on the psychosocial risk management index in 2012. In spite of this, work related illnesses attributed to organizational and social factors in the workplace have increased by 91% since 2011. Theoretically, if Sweden is very good at psychosocial risk management then the occupational illness levels related to the organizational and social work environment should be decreasing and not steadily on the rise. This paper presents findings from a study of how large companies in Sweden work with the psychosocial work environment one year after the introduction of organizational and social work environment legislation in Sweden in March 2016. Method – Telephone interviews about the psychosocial work environment were carried out with five large companies acknowledged to be good employers in Sweden; Volvo Car AB, Swedish Public Service Television company, AB Volvo, Microsoft and SKF. Informants belonging to the HR department on a global or national level in Sweden completed the interview. The interviews were transcribed during the interview and the accuracy of the content approved by each company before being included in the data set. Preliminary Results – The analysis of the results are ongoing. Preliminary findings suggest that; companies express a willingness to work systematically with the psychosocial work environment in a way similar to the physical work environment; that the introduction of legislation instigated some actions, and that the employee satisfaction survey is used as a form of risk analysis tool. Further, companies differ in whether they focus on the individual or the work environment when working to alleviate the negative health effects of work related stress after it has been detected. The findings are discussed in relation to work factors, psychosocial risk management and finally proactive & reactive tools and methods used. Preliminary Conclusions – The study provides an insight into what companies are actually doing when they are working with the psychosocial work environment. The contribution to science is increasing knowledge about how companies may be following all or some of the risk management process and what actions and tools they are using to do it.

  • 22.
    Birkie, Seyoum Eshetu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Bellgran, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Managing manufacturing footprint decisions for better sustainability2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 24.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013), Cranfield, United Kingdom, 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 25.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Production Localization Factors: An Industrial and Literature Based Review2013In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR2013) / [ed] E. Shehab, P. Ball & B. Tjahjono, International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR) , 2013, p. 489-494Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision are commonly based on the available or easily accessible information; this is also true for more complex assessments like production localization. Where to locate production is often a key strategic decisions that has great impact on a company’s profitability for a long time; insufficient business intelligence may therefore have grave consequences. Six production localization factor studies have been assessed to see if they are focusing on the same issues and if there are any gaps. A new approach for structuring localization factors and the localization process is then presented and assessed with regards to some previously identified critical issues.

  • 26.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Characteristics affecting management of design information in the production system design process2013In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 3241-3251Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it has been argued that the design of production systems is crucial, there is a general lack of empirical studies analysing and identifying resources and capabilities required for an efficient production system design process. One of these resources is the critical role attributed to design information and one such capability is how the design information is managed. To address this research gap, this paper reports the results from two in-depth case studies in the automotive industry focusing on the management of design information in the production system design process. Our results show that design information management needs to be understood as a multidimensional concept having three dimensions: acquiring, sharing and using design information. By focusing on the three dimensions, six characteristics affecting the management of design information when designing the production system are identified. The characteristics are information type, source of information, communication medium, formalisation, information quality and pragmatic information. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  • 27.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Creating a competitive edge when designing production systems: facilitating the sharing of design information2012In: International Journal of Services Sciences, ISSN 1753-1454, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 257-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing production systems, design information must be shared among functions at the manufacturing company and the external equipment supplier in order to integrate the various work activities. In this paper, factors facilitating the sharing of design information are analysed based on an in-depth case study of a supplier in the automotive industry. First, our findings show that the sharing of design information is promoted by formalisation. Second, informal coordination mechanisms are more crucial for internal integration between specialised functions than for external integration with the equipment supplier. Finally, our findings indicate that personal and language barriers appear more difficult to overcome than organisational bounds or geographical distance. Altogether, the findings provide strong evidence for the importance of sharing design information when designing more sophisticated production systems.

  • 28.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Critical factors for successful user-supplier integration in the production system design process2013In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Competitive Manufacturing for Innovative Products and Services: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2012, Rhodes, Greece, September 24-26, 2012, Revised Selected Papers, Part I / [ed] C. Emmanouilidis, M. Taisch, D. Kiritsis (Eds.), Springer, 2013, p. 421-428Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of equipment suppliers in the design of the production system has often been associated with major benefits. However, from a managerial perspective, integration between the user and the suppliers of the production equipment is still challenging. Therefore, the purpose of the research is to explore how manufacturing companies can facilitate and manage equipment supplier integration when designing the production system. Based on an real time case study in the automotive industry 10 critical factors for successful supplier/user integration are identified, which can be classified into three categories: human factors, project management factors and design factors.

  • 29.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Design information for efficient equipment supplier/buyer integration2012In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 484-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the underlying design information and success factors for production equipment acquisition, in order to support the design of high-performance production systems. Design/methodology/approach - The research strategy employed was an in-depth case study of an industrialization project, together with a questionnaire of 25 equipment suppliers. Findings - The study provides the reader with an insight into the role of design information when acquiring production equipment by addressing questions such as: What type of information is used? How do equipment suppliers obtain information? What factors facilitate a smooth production system acquisition? Research limitations/implications - Limitations are primarily associated with the chosen research methodology, which requires further empirical studies to establish a generic value. Practical implications - The implications are that manufacturing companies have to transfer various types of design information with respect to the content and kind of information. More attention has to be placed on what information is transferred to ensure that equipment suppliers receive all the information needed to design and subsequently build the production equipment. To facilitate integration of equipment suppliers, manufacturing companies should appoint a contact person who can gather, understand and transform relevant design information. Originality/value - External integration of equipment suppliers in production system design by means of design information is an area that has been rarely addressed in academia and industry

  • 30.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Integrated portfolio planning of products and production systems2014In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 155-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the research presented is to analyse and discuss critical challenges related A to the development of a production system portfolio. Design/methodology/approach: The study employs a longitudinal case study of an industrialization project at a global supplier in the automotive industry. Findings: This research makes two clear theoretical contributions. First, it extends the existing research on the manufacturing and R&D interface by proposing an innovative structure for production system development facilitating manufacturing companies in their efforts of being fast and cost-effective when introducing new products to the market. Second, this research identifies challenges related to the adoption of a production system portfolio and the necessary actions of a manufacturing company applying such a portfolio strategy. Research limitations/implications: The findings should be seen as a first attempt at assisting the development of a production system portfolio that matches the product portfolio. However, since the findings are based on only one case, the findings are to some extent context-specific and thus need to be complemented by more research. Practical implications: The research unveils challenges related to production system development and provides managers with a better understanding of some of the implications of the adoption of a portfolio strategy. Originality/value: This empirical study is among the first to explore the implications of a production system portfolio strategy. It advances the understanding towards a fully integrated product and production system development.

  • 31.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    The critical role of design information for improved equipment supplier integration during production system design2011In: Proceedings of the 44th CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acquisition of production equipment is one step of the production system design process. When design and building of production equipment is handed over to an equipment supplier, higher requirements are placed on the design information exchange to secure that the equipment corresponds to technical and financial requirements of the buying company. The paper presents results on characteristics of design information exchanged and success factors for effective collaboration between equipment suppliers and manufacturing companies. Results are based on an in-depth case study at a Swedish manufacturing company and a survey of 25 equipment suppliers.

  • 32.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation. Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Angelis, J.
    Warwick Business School, Warwick University, Coventry, United Kingdom .
    Information management for production system desingn with a new portfolio approach2011In: 21st International Conference on Production Research: Innovation in Product and Production, ICPR 2011 - Conference Proceedings, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective management of information is vital for successful development of new products. However, knowledge is lacking about the management of information during production system design and its effects on innovation. This exploratory case study in the automotive industry furthers understanding of how management of information contributes to the design of robust and dynamic production systems that can handle changing production situations. The results from the case study indicate that the management of information should consider requirements of current and future production system generations facilitating a conscious planning of a production systems portfolio that corresponds to the product portfolio. This approach allows for new ways of designing production system concepts and production technology solutions, which also can accelerate the innovation capabilities of the manufacturing company.

  • 33.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan Jönköping.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Angelis, Jannis
    3Warwick Business School, Warwick University.
    Information Management for Production System Design with a New Portfolio Approach2011In: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Production Research, Stuttgart: Fraunhofer-Verlag , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective management of information is vital for successful development of new products. However, knowledge is lacking about the management of information during production system design and its effects on innovation. This exploratory case study in the automotive industry furthers understanding of how management of information contributes to the design of robust and dynamic production systems that can handle changing production situations. The results from the case study indicate that the management of information should consider requirements of current and future production system generations facilitating a conscious planning of a production systems portfolio that corresponds to the product portfolio. This approach allows for new ways of designing production system concepts and production technology solutions, which also can accelerate the innovation capabilities of the manufacturing company.

  • 34.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bennett, David
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    COLLABORATIVE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS2014In: International Conference of the International Association for Management of Technology IAMOT, Proceedings, Washington, United States, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative development between the user and the equipment supplier of production technology has an increasingly important effect in terms of generating innovative, sustainable, and unique production process ideas that can be easily ramped-up to high volume production. However, joint development of production technology is challenging and has received surprisingly limited attention. Against this background the objective of the paper is to explore collaborative challenges from the equipment suppliers and customers’ perspectives in production technology development projects, and to suggest strategies for how these challenges can be addressed. Empirically the results are based on multiple case studies from two manufacturing companies in Sweden (i.e. users) and two equipment suppliers, ensuring that the perspectives of both the user and supplier sides in production technology development projects are considered. Our findings show that the identified collaboration challenges do not only relate to inter-organizational development activities but also to the companies’ internal characteristics, i.e. the prerequisites for company collaboration. Internal characteristics have a clear impact on the ability to bridge the interface with the equipment supplier and thus to advance the collaboration in production technology development projects. Our findings underscore the importance of having intra and inter-organizational strategies to enhance the success related to collaboration in production technology development projects.

  • 35.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Johansson, Christer
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Exploring requirement specification of the production system – a position paper2009In: Paper presented at the 3rd SwedishProduction Symposium, Gothenburg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s turbulent environment, manufacturing companies are forced to efficiently change or develop production systems that are robust and dynamic enough to handle changing production situations during its entire life-cycle. To achieve such a production system requires a structured development process that should be carried out simultaneously to the product development process and considers the company’s product portfolio. Within a structured development process, the requirements specification of the proposed system is vital since it will guide the design process and the evaluation of the system on a conceptual as well as a detailed level. The aim of this paper is to address the requirement specification process that covers all aspects of the production system to be designed. This paper argues for the need of a holistic view in the requirement specification process of production systems. A holistic view of the overall process will facilitate to manage the various demands and categories important to deal with in the specification of requirements. Based on the holistic view it will be possible to identify the gates and stakeholders of the process itself, but also the substantial content of this process map.

  • 36.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lakshmikanthan, Jayaprakash
    Tabiri, Godfred
    Sourcing factors affecting production localisation decisions2012In: Capturing Value in International Manufacturing and Supply Networks New models for a changing world: Symposium proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many factors affect the production localisation process of global manufacturing companies. An area of great impact is the strategy for how to source material and components for a new production location. This paper presents a review of the main factors affecting the overall decision of localising production to a new site, and seeks to identify whether the sourcing and supply base development was considered during the decision process or not and in which way. The paper is based on interviews within four global manufacturing companies. The results of the theoretical and empirical studies indicate that the two most important factors affecting the production location at the studied companies were cost and proximity to markets/customers, verifying the expected reasons, while the impact of the sourcing factors was only considered to a less extent when making a location decision.

  • 37.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH. Research area Industrial Production. Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalens högskola, Innovation och produktrealisering.
    User-supplier integration throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As production equipment is often designed and built by equipment suppliers rather than made in-house, a collaborative buyer-supplier-relationship could be utilized in order to create robust solutions and enhance innovative ideas. The purpose with this paper is to explore critical user-supplier collaboration activities throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment development. The purpose is accomplished by a literature review and a case study including more than 30 semi-structured interviews at four companies. The challenges vary depending on equipment life cycle phase and user/supplier perspective. A life cycle model with eight stages is proposed including critical interconnected activities for each stage.

  • 38.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Rösiö, Carin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Granlund, Anna
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    User-supplier integration throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment2014In: 6th Swedish Production Symposium SPS'14, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As production equipment is often designed and built by equipment suppliers rather than made in-house, a collaborative buyer-supplier-relationship could be utilized in order to create robust solutions and enhance innovative ideas. The purpose with this paper is to explore critical user-supplier collaboration activities throughout the different lifecycle stages of the production equipment development. The purpose is accomplished by a literature review and a case study including more than 30 semi-structured interviews at four companies. The challenges vary depending on equipment life cycle phase and user/supplier perspective. A life cycle model with eight stages is proposed including critical interconnected activities for each stage.

  • 39.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Manufacturing location decision: a case study on process and criteria2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Manufacturing location decision: a case study on process and criteria2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    On the production location decision: A case study on process and criteria2014In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 74-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the process and criteria used in production location decisions, based on a literature overview and a case study in a Swedish manufacturing company with a global production network. The data collection comprised interviews with top management and project management as well as a document analysis. The findings indicate that the production location decision process is facilitated by following a stepwise process with an initial strategic analysis with a broad scope including also the selection of the future production system concept.

  • 42.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    On the production location decision: A case study on process and criteria2014In: International Journal of Manufacturing Research, ISSN 1750-0591, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 74-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores the process and criteria used in production location decisions, based on a literature overview and a case study in a Swedish manufacturing company with a global production network. The data collection comprised interviews with top management and project management as well as a document analysis. The findings indicate that the production location decision process is facilitated by following a stepwise process with an initial strategic analysis with a broad scope including also the selection of the future production system concept.

  • 43.
    Bruch, Jessica
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Salloum, Mohammed
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    In search for improved decision making on manufacturing footprint: A conceptual model for information handling2011In: Proceedings of the 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, Lund, 2011, p. 63-68Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The footprint strategy of a manufacturing company is frequently highlighted as a key aspect to the company's competitive advantage. However, research concerning international location decisions is limited. A comprehensive strategy has to function in a world with limited resources and continuous change of values. The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model of the process for efficient production localisation decisions by integrating aspects influencing the design of the manufacturing footprint. Research on drivers for location of manufacturing emphasise input factors, market factors and technological knowhow as key factors. Looking at the entire industrial system, earlier research also illustrates the broad range of roles for the manufacturing plant within a company's industrial system. Based upon this discussion of the motive for manufacturing location and the strategic role of the manufacturing plant, a conceptual model is introduced emphasising different levels that should be considered during the process of preparing a localisation decision. It serves as a base for more detailed studies on specific aspects, models and factors for manufacturing footprint analysis.

  • 44.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Factory-in-a-box - Demonstrating the next generation manufacturing provider2008In: Manufacturing systems and technologies for the new frontier / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda and Fumihiko Kimura, Springer London , 2008, p. 341-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting customer demands require manufacturing systems with a high degree of flexibility, low-cost/low-volume manufacturing skills, as well as short delivery times. On top of these challenges, there is a gigantic need within industry for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO(2) emissions globally. In this challenging environment there is a need to identify and develop new and improved manufacturing capabilities within the manufacturing industry. The Factory-in-a-Box concept consists of standardized production modules that are e.g. installed in a container and transported by truck or by train. The concept has been developed, exemplified and realized in five industrial demonstrators developed by researchers together with competitive manufacturing companies in Sweden such as ABB Robotics, Bombardier and Pharmadule. The objective of this paper is to discuss the possibility of realizing a Product Service System (PSS) using the results from the Factory-in-a-Box project.

  • 45.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Factory-in-a-box - Demonstrating the next generation manufacturing provider2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda and Fumihiko Kimura, Springer London, 2008, p. 341-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Meeting customer demands require manufacturing systems with a high degree of flexibility, low-cost/low-volume manufacturing skills, as well as short delivery times. On top of these challenges, there is a gigantic need within industry for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO(2) emissions globally. In this challenging environment there is a need to identify and develop new and improved manufacturing capabilities within the manufacturing industry. The Factory-in-a-Box concept consists of standardized production modules that are e.g. installed in a container and transported by truck or by train. The concept has been developed, exemplified and realized in five industrial demonstrators developed by researchers together with competitive manufacturing companies in Sweden such as ABB Robotics, Bombardier and Pharmadule. The objective of this paper is to discuss the possibility of realizing a Product Service System (PSS) using the results from the Factory-in-a-Box project.

  • 46.
    Jackson, Mats
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för innovation, design och teknik.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Factory-in-a-box - Demonstrating the next generation manufacturing provider2008In: Manufacturing systems and technologies for the new frontier / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda and Fumihiko Kimura, Springer London , 2008, p. 341-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting customer demands require manufacturing systems with a high degree of flexibility, low-cost/low-volume manufacturing skills, as well as short delivery times. On top of these challenges, there is a gigantic need within industry for technologies and strategies that will reduce CO(2) emissions globally. In this challenging environment there is a need to identify and develop new and improved manufacturing capabilities within the manufacturing industry. The Factory-in-a-Box concept consists of standardized production modules that are e.g. installed in a container and transported by truck or by train. The concept has been developed, exemplified and realized in five industrial demonstrators developed by researchers together with competitive manufacturing companies in Sweden such as ABB Robotics, Bombardier and Pharmadule. The objective of this paper is to discuss the possibility of realizing a Product Service System (PSS) using the results from the Factory-in-a-Box project.

  • 47.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Challenges in the Industrialization Process of Low-Volume Production Systems2013In: International Conference on Manufacturing Research 2013, Cranfield, United Kingdom: Cranfield university press , 2013, p. 39-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical part of new product development projects is the industrialization process of new products which affects both time and the cost. The industrialization of new products or variants in low-volume production systems has some specific challenges which are caused by characteristics of low-volume products and production systems. Therefore, an exploratory case study is made within two Swedish manufacturing companies to understand these challenges and compare the industrialization process in high and low volume production systems. The results of the multiple case studies indicate four challenges including knowledge transfer from the projects into production, development of the work instructions, the need for a higher level of training of the operators and production system design and the obligatory tailoring of the new products to the existing production systems.

  • 48.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Characteristics of product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries: A case study2016In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, ISSN 1741038X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 535-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the characteristics of low-volume manufacturing industries influence the product introduction process and factors which can facilitate that process in low-volume manufacturing industries.

    Design/methodology/approach: A literature review in combination with a multiple-case study were used to achieve the purpose of the paper. The multiple-case study was based on two product development projects in a low-volume manufacturing company.

    Findings: The main identified characteristics of the product introduction process in low-volume manufacturing industries were a low number of prototypes, absence of conventional production ramp-up, reduced complexity of the process, failure to consider the manufacturability of the products due to an extensive focus on their functionality, and increased complexity of resource allocation. It was determined that knowledge and experiences from prior production of similar products could serve as a facilitator of the manufacturing process.

    Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this study is that the identified characteristics and facilitating factors are confined to the internal variables of the studied company. A study of the role of external variables during the product introduction process such as suppliers and customers could be the subject of future studies.

    Practical implications: This research will provide practitioners in low-volume manufacturing industries with general insight about the characteristics of the product introduction process and the aspects that should be considered during the process.

  • 49.
    Javadi, Siavash
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bruch, Jessica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Bellgran, Monica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Innovation and Product Realisation.
    Product development in low-volume manufacturing industries: Characteristics and influencing factors2015In: DS 80-4 PROCEEDINGS OF THE 20TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN (ICED 15) VOL 4: DESIGN FOR X, DESIGN TO X, 2015, p. 145-154Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development process has a considerable effect on factors such as time to market and quality of product which are vital for manufacturing companies to remain competitive. Therefore, study of the factors which influence the product development process such as characteristics of products and production systems is necessary to support and improve the product development process. Since most of the studies have been conducted in the context of high-volume manufacturing industries, the influences of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems on the product development process in such industries have not been considered sufficiently. In this paper, characteristics of low-volume products and production systems, their inter-relations and their influences on the product development process have been studied through a multiple case study. A general map of characteristics of low-volume products and production systems and their inter-relations was presented in this paper. Moreover, the influences of these characteristics on product development process including the reduced complexity of the process and lack of opportunities for test and refinement were discussed.

  • 50.
    Kurdve, Martin
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Bellgran, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Operationalisation of the circular economy concept at the factory shop floor2019In: Proceedings of the 6th EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
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